Name Report For First Name WILFORD:

WILFORD

First name WILFORD's origins are German and English. WILFORD means "desires peace" (German) and "from the willow ford desires peace" in English. You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with WILFORD below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of wilford.(Brown names are of the same origin (German,English) with WILFORD and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with WILFORD - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming WILFORD

FIRST NAMES WHICH INCLUDES WİLFORD AS A WHOLE:

 

NAMES RHYMING WITH WİLFORD (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 6 Letters (ilford) - Names That Ends with ilford:

gilford milford tilford

Rhyming Names According to Last 5 Letters (lford) - Names That Ends with lford:

salford talford watelford telford welford alford halford walford

Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (ford) - Names That Ends with ford:

ashford pickford ransford rexford stanford aescford aisford berford biecaford biford blandford blanford burhford clyford guifford haraford harford heanford huxeford jefford linford lynford oxnaford picford raedford rangford redford reeford rockford rufford ryscford salhford stamford steathford stefford twiford weiford wiellaford wylingford watford warford twyford sanford stafford safford rushford ruford radford oxford huxford hartford hanford gifford clifford byford burford bickford beresford hlaford bradford crawford ford hrytherford hwitford langford lawford orford rumford rutherford stratford whitford rayford

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (ord) - Names That Ends with ord:

alvord cord kord raynord rexlord word ord

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (rd) - Names That Ends with rd:

ballard cyneheard bard gotthard ceneward willard bayard cinnard kinnard reynard

NAMES RHYMING WITH WİLFORD (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 6 Letters (wilfor) - Names That Begins with wilfor:

Rhyming Names According to First 5 Letters (wilfo) - Names That Begins with wilfo:

Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (wilf) - Names That Begins with wilf:

wilfr wilfred wilfredo wilfrid wilfryd

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (wil) - Names That Begins with wil:

wilbart wilber wilbert wilbur wilburn wilburt wilda wilde wildon wiley wilhelm wilhelmina wilhelmine will willa willaburh willamar willan willaperht willem willesone willhard william williamon williams williamson willie willifrid willimod willis willmar willmarr willoughby willow willsn willy wilma wilmar wilmer wilmod wilmot wilona wilone wilpe wilpert wilson wilton

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (wi) - Names That Begins with wi:

wiatt wicasa wiccum wichamm wichell wickam wickley wicleah widad wido wiellaburne wiellaby wielladun wiellatun wigburg wigmaere wigman wihakayda wijdan wikimak wikvaya win wincel winchell windell windgate windham windsor wine winef winefield winefrith winema winetorp winfield winfred winfrid winfrith wingate winif winifred winifreda winifrid winifride winn winnie winola winona

NAMES BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH WİLFORD:

First Names which starts with 'wil' and ends with 'ord':

First Names which starts with 'wi' and ends with 'rd':

winward

First Names which starts with 'w' and ends with 'd':

wacfeld waed wafid wahed wahid wakefield walborgd waldifrid waleed walfred walfrid walid walmond ward warfield wayland weard wegland weifield weyland whitfield winswod winwood woodward wudoweard wyifrid wynfield wynfrid wynward

English Words Rhyming WILFORD

ENGLISH WORDS WHICH INCLUDES WİLFORD AS A WHOLE:



ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH WİLFORD (According to last letters):


Rhyming Words According to Last 6 Letters (ilford) - English Words That Ends with ilford:



Rhyming Words According to Last 5 Letters (lford) - English Words That Ends with lford:


telfordadjective (a.) Designating, or pert. to, a road pavement having a surface of small stone rolled hard and smooth, distinguished from macadam road by its firm foundation of large stones with fragments of stone wedged tightly, in the interstices; as, telford pavement, road, etc.


Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (ford) - English Words That Ends with ford:


crawfordnoun (n.) A Crawford peach; a well-known freestone peach, with yellow flesh, first raised by Mr. William Crawford, of New Jersey.

hartfordnoun (n.) The Hartford grape, a variety of grape first raised at Hartford, Connecticut, from the Northern fox grape. Its large dark-colored berries ripen earlier than those of most other kinds.

herefordnoun (n.) One of a breed of cattle originating in Herefordshire, England. The Herefords are good working animals, and their beef-producing quality is excellent.

oxfordadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the city or university of Oxford, England.


Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (ord) - English Words That Ends with ord:


abordnoun (n.) Manner of approaching or accosting; address.
 verb (v. t.) To approach; to accost.

backswordnoun (n.) A sword with one sharp edge.
 noun (n.) In England, a stick with a basket handle, used in rustic amusements; also, the game in which the stick is used. Also called singlestick.

bedcordnoun (n.) A cord or rope interwoven in a bedstead so as to support the bed.

bordnoun (n.) A board; a table.
 noun (n.) The face of coal parallel to the natural fissures.
 noun (n.) See Bourd.

broadswordnoun (n.) A sword with a broad blade and a cutting edge; a claymore.

bywordnoun (n.) A common saying; a proverb; a saying that has a general currency.
 noun (n.) The object of a contemptuous saying.

catchwordnoun (n.) Among theatrical performers, the last word of the preceding speaker, which reminds one that he is to speak next; cue.
 noun (n.) The first word of any page of a book after the first, inserted at the right hand bottom corner of the preceding page for the assistance of the reader. It is seldom used in modern printing.
 noun (n.) A word or phrase caught up and repeated for effect; as, the catchword of a political party, etc.

chordnoun (n.) The string of a musical instrument.
 noun (n.) A combination of tones simultaneously performed, producing more or less perfect harmony, as, the common chord.
 noun (n.) A right line uniting the extremities of the arc of a circle or curve.
 noun (n.) A cord. See Cord, n., 4.
 noun (n.) The upper or lower part of a truss, usually horizontal, resisting compression or tension.
 verb (v. t.) To provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune.
 verb (v. i.) To accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that.

clarichordnoun (n.) A musical instrument, formerly in use, in form of a spinet; -- called also manichord and clavichord.

clavichordnoun (n.) A keyed stringed instrument, now superseded by the pianoforte. See Clarichord.

concordnoun (n.) A state of agreement; harmony; union.
 noun (n.) Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league.
 noun (n.) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
 noun (n.) An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant. See Fine.
 noun (n.) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
 noun (n.) A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.
 verb (v. i.) To agree; to act together.

cordnoun (n.) A string, or small rope, composed of several strands twisted together.
 noun (n.) A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line.
 noun (n.) Fig.: Any moral influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord; an enticement; as, the cords of the wicked; the cords of sin; the cords of vanity.
 noun (n.) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, esp. a tendon or a nerve. See under Spermatic, Spinal, Umbilical, Vocal.
 noun (n.) See Chord.
 verb (v. t.) To bind with a cord; to fasten with cords; to connect with cords; to ornament or finish with a cord or cords, as a garment.
 verb (v. t.) To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.
  (imp. & p. p.) of Core

decachordnoun (n.) Alt. of Decachordon

disaccordnoun (n.) Disagreement.
 verb (v. i.) To refuse to assent.

discordnoun (n.) To disagree; to be discordant; to jar; to clash; not to suit.
 verb (v. i.) Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes.
 verb (v. i.) Union of musical sounds which strikes the ear harshly or disagreeably, owing to the incommensurability of the vibrations which they produce; want of musical concord or harmony; a chord demanding resolution into a concord.

disordnoun (n.) Disorder.

fiordnoun (n.) A narrow inlet of the sea, penetrating between high banks or rocks, as on the coasts of Norway and Alaska.

fjordnoun (n.) See Fiord.

forewordnoun (n.) A preface.

gordnoun (n.) An instrument of gaming; a sort of dice.

harpsichordnoun (n.) A harp-shaped instrument of music set horizontally on legs, like the grand piano, with strings of wire, played by the fingers, by means of keys provided with quills, instead of hammers, for striking the strings. It is now superseded by the piano.

heptachordnoun (n.) A system of seven sounds.
 noun (n.) A lyre with seven chords.
 noun (n.) A composition sung to the sound of seven chords or tones.

hexachordnoun (n.) A series of six notes, with a semitone between the third and fourth, the other intervals being whole tones.

koordnoun (n.) See Kurd.

landlordnoun (n.) The lord of a manor, or of land; the owner of land or houses which he leases to a tenant or tenants.
 noun (n.) The master of an inn or of a lodging house.

loordnoun (n.) A dull, stupid fellow; a drone.

lordnoun (n.) A hump-backed person; -- so called sportively.
 noun (n.) One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor.
 noun (n.) A titled nobleman., whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a boron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank.
 noun (n.) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, etc.
 noun (n.) A husband.
 noun (n.) One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land; as, the lord of the soil; the lord of the manor.
 noun (n.) The Supreme Being; Jehovah.
 noun (n.) The Savior; Jesus Christ.
 verb (v. t.) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.
 verb (v. t.) To rule or preside over as a lord.
 verb (v. i.) To play the lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; -- sometimes with over; and sometimes with it in the manner of a transitive verb.

miswordnoun (n.) A word wrongly spoken; a cross word.
 verb (v. t.) To word wrongly; as, to misword a message, or a sentence.

monochordnoun (n.) An instrument for experimenting upon the mathematical relations of musical sounds. It consists of a single string stretched between two bridges, one or both of which are movable, and which stand upon a graduated rule for the purpose of readily changing and measuring the length of the part of the string between them.

milordnoun (n.) Lit., my lord; hence (as used on the Continent), an English nobleman or gentleman.

naywordnoun (n.) A byword; a proverb; also, a watchword.

neurochordadjective (a.) Alt. of Neurochordal

neurocordnoun (n.) A cordlike organ composed of elastic fibers situated above the ventral nervous cord of annelids, like the earthworm.

notochordnoun (n.) An elastic cartilagelike rod which is developed beneath the medullary groove in the vertebrate embryo, and constitutes the primitive axial skeleton around which the centra of the vertebrae and the posterior part of the base of the skull are developed; the chorda dorsalis. See Illust. of Ectoderm.

octachordnoun (n.) An instrument of eight strings; a system of eight tones.

octochordnoun (n.) See Octachord.

ordnoun (n.) An edge or point; also, a beginning.

overlordnoun (n.) One who is lord over another or others; a superior lord; a master.

passwordnoun (n.) A word to be given before a person is allowed to pass; a watchword; a countersign.

pentachordnoun (n.) An ancient instrument of music with five strings.
 noun (n.) An order or system of five sounds.

polychordnoun (n.) A musical instrument of ten strings.
 noun (n.) An apparatus for coupling two octave notes, capable of being attached to a keyed instrument.
 adjective (a.) Having many strings.

rheochordnoun (n.) A metallic wire used for regulating the resistance of a circuit, or varying the strength of an electric current, by inserting a greater or less length of it in the circuit.

seabordnoun (n. & a.) See Seaboard.

smallswordnoun (n.) A light sword used for thrusting only; especially, the sword worn by civilians of rank in the eighteenth century.

soordnoun (n.) Skin of bacon.

sordnoun (n.) See Sward.

swordnoun (n.) An offensive weapon, having a long and usually sharp/pointed blade with a cutting edge or edges. It is the general term, including the small sword, rapier, saber, scimiter, and many other varieties.
 noun (n.) Hence, the emblem of judicial vengeance or punishment, or of authority and power.
 noun (n.) Destruction by the sword, or in battle; war; dissension.
 noun (n.) The military power of a country.
 noun (n.) One of the end bars by which the lay of a hand loom is suspended.

tetrachordnoun (n.) A scale series of four sounds, of which the extremes, or first and last, constituted a fourth. These extremes were immutable; the two middle sounds were changeable.

trichordnoun (n.) An instrument, as a lyre or harp, having three strings.

urochordnoun (n.) The central axis or cord in the tail of larval ascidians and of certain adult tunicates.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH WİLFORD (According to first letters):


Rhyming Words According to First 6 Letters (wilfor) - Words That Begins with wilfor:



Rhyming Words According to First 5 Letters (wilfo) - Words That Begins with wilfo:



Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (wilf) - Words That Begins with wilf:


wilfulnoun (n.) Alt. of Wilfulness

wilfullynoun (n.) Alt. of Wilfulness

wilfulnessnoun (n.) See Willful, Willfully, and Willfulness.


Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (wil) - Words That Begins with wil:


wildnoun (n.) An uninhabited and uncultivated tract or region; a forest or desert; a wilderness; a waste; as, the wilds of America; the wilds of Africa.
 superlative (superl.) Living in a state of nature; inhabiting natural haunts, as the forest or open field; not familiar with, or not easily approached by, man; not tamed or domesticated; as, a wild boar; a wild ox; a wild cat.
 superlative (superl.) Growing or produced without culture; growing or prepared without the aid and care of man; native; not cultivated; brought forth by unassisted nature or by animals not domesticated; as, wild parsnip, wild camomile, wild strawberry, wild honey.
 superlative (superl.) Desert; not inhabited or cultivated; as, wild land.
 superlative (superl.) Savage; uncivilized; not refined by culture; ferocious; rude; as, wild natives of Africa or America.
 superlative (superl.) Not submitted to restraint, training, or regulation; turbulent; tempestuous; violent; ungoverned; licentious; inordinate; disorderly; irregular; fanciful; imaginary; visionary; crazy.
 superlative (superl.) Exposed to the wind and sea; unsheltered; as, a wild roadstead.
 superlative (superl.) Indicating strong emotion, intense excitement, or /ewilderment; as, a wild look.
 superlative (superl.) Hard to steer; -- said of a vessel.
 adverb (adv.) Wildly; as, to talk wild.

wildebeestnoun (n.) The gnu.

wildedadjective (a.) Become wild.

wilderingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wilder
 noun (n.) A plant growing in a state of nature; especially, one which has run wild, or escaped from cultivation.

wilderadjective (a.) To bewilder; to perplex.

wildermentnoun (n.) The state of being bewildered; confusion; bewilderment.

wildfirenoun (n.) A composition of inflammable materials, which, kindled, is very hard to quench; Greek fire.
 noun (n.) An old name for erysipelas.
 noun (n.) A disease of sheep, attended with inflammation of the skin.
 noun (n.) A sort of lightning unaccompanied by thunder.

wildgravenoun (n.) A waldgrave, or head forest keeper. See Waldgrave.

wildingnoun (n.) A wild or uncultivated plant; especially, a wild apple tree or crab apple; also, the fruit of such a plant.
 adjective (a.) Not tame, domesticated, or cultivated; wild.

wildishadjective (a.) Somewhat wild; rather wild.

wildnessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being wild; an uncultivated or untamed state; disposition to rove or go unrestrained; rudeness; savageness; irregularity; distraction.

wildwoodnoun (n.) A wild or unfrequented wood. Also used adjectively; as, wildwood flowers; wildwood echoes.

wilenoun (n.) A trick or stratagem practiced for insnaring or deception; a sly, insidious; artifice; a beguilement; an allurement.
 verb (v. t.) To practice artifice upon; to deceive; to beguile; to allure.
 verb (v. t.) To draw or turn away, as by diversion; to while or while away; to cause to pass pleasantly.

wilefuladjective (a.) Full of wiles; trickish; deceitful.

wilinessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being wily; craftiness; cunning; guile.

wilknoun (n.) See Whelk.

willingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Will
 verb (v. t.) Free to do or to grant; having the mind inclined; not opposed in mind; not choosing to refuse; disposed; not averse; desirous; consenting; complying; ready.
 verb (v. t.) Received of choice, or without reluctance; submitted to voluntarily; chosen; desired.
 verb (v. t.) Spontaneous; self-moved.

willnoun (n.) To form a distinct volition of; to determine by an act of choice; to ordain; to decree.
 noun (n.) To enjoin or command, as that which is determined by an act of volition; to direct; to order.
 noun (n.) To give or direct the disposal of by testament; to bequeath; to devise; as, to will one's estate to a child; also, to order or direct by testament; as, he willed that his nephew should have his watch.
 verb (v.) The power of choosing; the faculty or endowment of the soul by which it is capable of choosing; the faculty or power of the mind by which we decide to do or not to do; the power or faculty of preferring or selecting one of two or more objects.
 verb (v.) The choice which is made; a determination or preference which results from the act or exercise of the power of choice; a volition.
 verb (v.) The choice or determination of one who has authority; a decree; a command; discretionary pleasure.
 verb (v.) Strong wish or inclination; desire; purpose.
 verb (v.) That which is strongly wished or desired.
 verb (v.) Arbitrary disposal; power to control, dispose, or determine.
 verb (v.) The legal declaration of a person's mind as to the manner in which he would have his property or estate disposed of after his death; the written instrument, legally executed, by which a man makes disposition of his estate, to take effect after his death; testament; devise. See the Note under Testament, 1.
 adverb (adv.) To wish; to desire; to incline to have.
 adverb (adv.) As an auxiliary, will is used to denote futurity dependent on the verb. Thus, in first person, "I will" denotes willingness, consent, promise; and when "will" is emphasized, it denotes determination or fixed purpose; as, I will go if you wish; I will go at all hazards. In the second and third persons, the idea of distinct volition, wish, or purpose is evanescent, and simple certainty is appropriately expressed; as, "You will go," or "He will go," describes a future event as a fact only. To emphasize will denotes (according to the tone or context) certain futurity or fixed determination.
 verb (v. i.) To be willing; to be inclined or disposed; to be pleased; to wish; to desire.
 verb (v. i.) To exercise an act of volition; to choose; to decide; to determine; to decree.

willemitenoun (n.) A silicate of zinc, usually occurring massive and of a greenish yellow color, also in reddish crystals (troostite) containing manganese.

willernoun (n.) One who wills.

willetnoun (n.) A large North American snipe (Symphemia semipalmata); -- called also pill-willet, will-willet, semipalmated tattler, or snipe, duck snipe, and stone curlew.

willfuladjective (a.) Of set purpose; self-determined; voluntary; as, willful murder.
 adjective (a.) Governed by the will without yielding to reason; obstinate; perverse; inflexible; stubborn; refractory; as, a willful man or horse.

williernoun (n.) One who works at a willying machine.

willingnessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being willing; free choice or consent of the will; freedom from reluctance; readiness of the mind to do or forbear.

williwawnoun (n.) Alt. of Willywaw

willywawnoun (n.) A whirlwind, or whirlwind squall, encountered in the Straits of Magellan.

willocknoun (n.) The common guillemot.
 noun (n.) The puffin.

willownoun (n.) Any tree or shrub of the genus Salix, including many species, most of which are characterized often used as an emblem of sorrow, desolation, or desertion. "A wreath of willow to show my forsaken plight." Sir W. Scott. Hence, a lover forsaken by, or having lost, the person beloved, is said to wear the willow.
 noun (n.) A machine in which cotton or wool is opened and cleansed by the action of long spikes projecting from a drum which revolves within a box studded with similar spikes; -- probably so called from having been originally a cylindrical cage made of willow rods, though some derive the term from winnow, as denoting the winnowing, or cleansing, action of the machine. Called also willy, twilly, twilly devil, and devil.
 verb (v. t.) To open and cleanse, as cotton, flax, or wool, by means of a willow. See Willow, n., 2.

willowedadjective (a.) Abounding with willows; containing willows; covered or overgrown with willows.

willowernoun (n.) A willow. See Willow, n., 2.

willowishadjective (a.) Having the color of the willow; resembling the willow; willowy.

willowyadjective (a.) Abounding with willows.
 adjective (a.) Resembling a willow; pliant; flexible; pendent; drooping; graceful.

willsomeadjective (a.) Willful; obstinate.
 adjective (a.) Fat; indolent.
 adjective (a.) Doubtful; uncertain.

willynoun (n.) A large wicker basket.
 noun (n.) Same as 1st Willow, 2.

willyingnoun (n.) The process of cleansing wool, cotton, or the like, with a willy, or willow.

wilwenoun (n.) Willow.

ENGLISH WORDS BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH WİLFORD:

English Words which starts with 'wil' and ends with 'ord':



English Words which starts with 'wi' and ends with 'rd':

windwardnoun (n.) The point or side from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the windward; -- opposed to leeward.
 adjective (a.) Situated toward the point from which the wind blows; as, the Windward Islands.
 adverb (adv.) Toward the wind; in the direction from which the wind blows.

wisardnoun (n.) See Wizard.

wizardnoun (n.) A wise man; a sage.
 noun (n.) One devoted to the black art; a magician; a conjurer; a sorcerer; an enchanter.
 adjective (a.) Enchanting; charming.
 adjective (a.) Haunted by wizards.