Name Report For First Name WHITFORD:


First name WHITFORD's origin is English. WHITFORD means "from the white ford". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with WHITFORD below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of whitford.(Brown names are of the same origin (English) with WHITFORD and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with WHITFORD - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming WHITFORD



NAMES RHYMING WITH WHÝTFORD (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 7 Letters (hitford) - Names That Ends with hitford:

Rhyming Names According to Last 6 Letters (itford) - Names That Ends with itford:


Rhyming Names According to Last 5 Letters (tford) - Names That Ends with tford:

watford hartford stratford

Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (ford) - Names That Ends with ford:

ashford pickford ransford rexford stanford aescford aisford berford biecaford biford blandford blanford burhford clyford guifford haraford harford heanford huxeford jefford linford lynford oxnaford picford raedford rangford redford reeford rockford rufford ryscford salford salhford stamford steathford stefford talford twiford watelford weiford wiellaford wilford wylingford telford welford warford twyford sanford stafford safford rushford ruford radford oxford huxford hanford gifford clifford byford burford bickford beresford alford hlaford bradford crawford ford gilford halford hrytherford langford lawford milford orford rumford rutherford tilford walford rayford

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (ord) - Names That Ends with ord:

alvord cord kord raynord rexlord word ord

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (rd) - Names That Ends with rd:

ballard cyneheard bard gotthard ceneward willard bayard cinnard kinnard reynard

NAMES RHYMING WITH WHÝTFORD (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 7 Letters (whitfor) - Names That Begins with whitfor:

Rhyming Names According to First 6 Letters (whitfo) - Names That Begins with whitfo:

Rhyming Names According to First 5 Letters (whitf) - Names That Begins with whitf:


Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (whit) - Names That Begins with whit:

whitby whitcomb whitelaw whiteman whitlaw whitley whitlock whitman whitmoor whitmore whitnei whitney whittaker

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (whi) - Names That Begins with whi:


Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (wh) - Names That Begins with wh:

wharton wheatley wheeler whelan whytlok


First Names which starts with 'whi' and ends with 'ord':

First Names which starts with 'wh' and ends with 'rd':

First Names which starts with 'w' and ends with 'd':

wacfeld waed wafid wahed wahid wakefield walborgd waldifrid waleed walfred walfrid walid walmond ward warfield wayland weard wegland weifield weyland widad wilfred wilfrid wilfryd willhard willifrid willimod wilmod winefield winfield winfred winfrid winifred winifrid winswod winward winwood woodward wudoweard wyifrid wynfield wynfrid wynward

English Words Rhyming WHITFORD


ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH WHÝTFORD (According to last letters):

Rhyming Words According to Last 7 Letters (hitford) - English Words That Ends with hitford:

Rhyming Words According to Last 6 Letters (itford) - English Words That Ends with itford:

Rhyming Words According to Last 5 Letters (tford) - English Words That Ends with tford:

hartfordnoun (n.) The Hartford grape, a variety of grape first raised at Hartford, Connecticut, from the Northern fox grape. Its large dark-colored berries ripen earlier than those of most other kinds.

Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (ford) - English Words That Ends with ford:

crawfordnoun (n.) A Crawford peach; a well-known freestone peach, with yellow flesh, first raised by Mr. William Crawford, of New Jersey.

herefordnoun (n.) One of a breed of cattle originating in Herefordshire, England. The Herefords are good working animals, and their beef-producing quality is excellent.

oxfordadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the city or university of Oxford, England.

telfordadjective (a.) Designating, or pert. to, a road pavement having a surface of small stone rolled hard and smooth, distinguished from macadam road by its firm foundation of large stones with fragments of stone wedged tightly, in the interstices; as, telford pavement, road, etc.

Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (ord) - English Words That Ends with ord:

abordnoun (n.) Manner of approaching or accosting; address.
 verb (v. t.) To approach; to accost.

backswordnoun (n.) A sword with one sharp edge.
 noun (n.) In England, a stick with a basket handle, used in rustic amusements; also, the game in which the stick is used. Also called singlestick.

bedcordnoun (n.) A cord or rope interwoven in a bedstead so as to support the bed.

bordnoun (n.) A board; a table.
 noun (n.) The face of coal parallel to the natural fissures.
 noun (n.) See Bourd.

broadswordnoun (n.) A sword with a broad blade and a cutting edge; a claymore.

bywordnoun (n.) A common saying; a proverb; a saying that has a general currency.
 noun (n.) The object of a contemptuous saying.

catchwordnoun (n.) Among theatrical performers, the last word of the preceding speaker, which reminds one that he is to speak next; cue.
 noun (n.) The first word of any page of a book after the first, inserted at the right hand bottom corner of the preceding page for the assistance of the reader. It is seldom used in modern printing.
 noun (n.) A word or phrase caught up and repeated for effect; as, the catchword of a political party, etc.

chordnoun (n.) The string of a musical instrument.
 noun (n.) A combination of tones simultaneously performed, producing more or less perfect harmony, as, the common chord.
 noun (n.) A right line uniting the extremities of the arc of a circle or curve.
 noun (n.) A cord. See Cord, n., 4.
 noun (n.) The upper or lower part of a truss, usually horizontal, resisting compression or tension.
 verb (v. t.) To provide with musical chords or strings; to string; to tune.
 verb (v. i.) To accord; to harmonize together; as, this note chords with that.

clarichordnoun (n.) A musical instrument, formerly in use, in form of a spinet; -- called also manichord and clavichord.

clavichordnoun (n.) A keyed stringed instrument, now superseded by the pianoforte. See Clarichord.

concordnoun (n.) A state of agreement; harmony; union.
 noun (n.) Agreement by stipulation; compact; covenant; treaty or league.
 noun (n.) Agreement of words with one another, in gender, number, person, or case.
 noun (n.) An agreement between the parties to a fine of land in reference to the manner in which it should pass, being an acknowledgment that the land in question belonged to the complainant. See Fine.
 noun (n.) An agreeable combination of tones simultaneously heard; a consonant chord; consonance; harmony.
 noun (n.) A variety of American grape, with large dark blue (almost black) grapes in compact clusters.
 verb (v. i.) To agree; to act together.

cordnoun (n.) A string, or small rope, composed of several strands twisted together.
 noun (n.) A solid measure, equivalent to 128 cubic feet; a pile of wood, or other coarse material, eight feet long, four feet high, and four feet broad; -- originally measured with a cord or line.
 noun (n.) Fig.: Any moral influence by which persons are caught, held, or drawn, as if by a cord; an enticement; as, the cords of the wicked; the cords of sin; the cords of vanity.
 noun (n.) Any structure having the appearance of a cord, esp. a tendon or a nerve. See under Spermatic, Spinal, Umbilical, Vocal.
 noun (n.) See Chord.
 verb (v. t.) To bind with a cord; to fasten with cords; to connect with cords; to ornament or finish with a cord or cords, as a garment.
 verb (v. t.) To arrange (wood, etc.) in a pile for measurement by the cord.
  (imp. & p. p.) of Core

decachordnoun (n.) Alt. of Decachordon

disaccordnoun (n.) Disagreement.
 verb (v. i.) To refuse to assent.

discordnoun (n.) To disagree; to be discordant; to jar; to clash; not to suit.
 verb (v. i.) Want of concord or agreement; absence of unity or harmony in sentiment or action; variance leading to contention and strife; disagreement; -- applied to persons or to things, and to thoughts, feelings, or purposes.
 verb (v. i.) Union of musical sounds which strikes the ear harshly or disagreeably, owing to the incommensurability of the vibrations which they produce; want of musical concord or harmony; a chord demanding resolution into a concord.

disordnoun (n.) Disorder.

fiordnoun (n.) A narrow inlet of the sea, penetrating between high banks or rocks, as on the coasts of Norway and Alaska.

fjordnoun (n.) See Fiord.

forewordnoun (n.) A preface.

gordnoun (n.) An instrument of gaming; a sort of dice.

harpsichordnoun (n.) A harp-shaped instrument of music set horizontally on legs, like the grand piano, with strings of wire, played by the fingers, by means of keys provided with quills, instead of hammers, for striking the strings. It is now superseded by the piano.

heptachordnoun (n.) A system of seven sounds.
 noun (n.) A lyre with seven chords.
 noun (n.) A composition sung to the sound of seven chords or tones.

hexachordnoun (n.) A series of six notes, with a semitone between the third and fourth, the other intervals being whole tones.

koordnoun (n.) See Kurd.

landlordnoun (n.) The lord of a manor, or of land; the owner of land or houses which he leases to a tenant or tenants.
 noun (n.) The master of an inn or of a lodging house.

loordnoun (n.) A dull, stupid fellow; a drone.

lordnoun (n.) A hump-backed person; -- so called sportively.
 noun (n.) One who has power and authority; a master; a ruler; a governor; a prince; a proprietor, as of a manor.
 noun (n.) A titled nobleman., whether a peer of the realm or not; a bishop, as a member of the House of Lords; by courtesy; the son of a duke or marquis, or the eldest son of an earl; in a restricted sense, a boron, as opposed to noblemen of higher rank.
 noun (n.) A title bestowed on the persons above named; and also, for honor, on certain official persons; as, lord advocate, lord chamberlain, lord chancellor, lord chief justice, etc.
 noun (n.) A husband.
 noun (n.) One of whom a fee or estate is held; the male owner of feudal land; as, the lord of the soil; the lord of the manor.
 noun (n.) The Supreme Being; Jehovah.
 noun (n.) The Savior; Jesus Christ.
 verb (v. t.) To invest with the dignity, power, and privileges of a lord.
 verb (v. t.) To rule or preside over as a lord.
 verb (v. i.) To play the lord; to domineer; to rule with arbitrary or despotic sway; -- sometimes with over; and sometimes with it in the manner of a transitive verb.

miswordnoun (n.) A word wrongly spoken; a cross word.
 verb (v. t.) To word wrongly; as, to misword a message, or a sentence.

monochordnoun (n.) An instrument for experimenting upon the mathematical relations of musical sounds. It consists of a single string stretched between two bridges, one or both of which are movable, and which stand upon a graduated rule for the purpose of readily changing and measuring the length of the part of the string between them.

milordnoun (n.) Lit., my lord; hence (as used on the Continent), an English nobleman or gentleman.

naywordnoun (n.) A byword; a proverb; also, a watchword.

neurochordadjective (a.) Alt. of Neurochordal

neurocordnoun (n.) A cordlike organ composed of elastic fibers situated above the ventral nervous cord of annelids, like the earthworm.

notochordnoun (n.) An elastic cartilagelike rod which is developed beneath the medullary groove in the vertebrate embryo, and constitutes the primitive axial skeleton around which the centra of the vertebrae and the posterior part of the base of the skull are developed; the chorda dorsalis. See Illust. of Ectoderm.

octachordnoun (n.) An instrument of eight strings; a system of eight tones.

octochordnoun (n.) See Octachord.

ordnoun (n.) An edge or point; also, a beginning.

overlordnoun (n.) One who is lord over another or others; a superior lord; a master.

passwordnoun (n.) A word to be given before a person is allowed to pass; a watchword; a countersign.

pentachordnoun (n.) An ancient instrument of music with five strings.
 noun (n.) An order or system of five sounds.

polychordnoun (n.) A musical instrument of ten strings.
 noun (n.) An apparatus for coupling two octave notes, capable of being attached to a keyed instrument.
 adjective (a.) Having many strings.

rheochordnoun (n.) A metallic wire used for regulating the resistance of a circuit, or varying the strength of an electric current, by inserting a greater or less length of it in the circuit.

seabordnoun (n. & a.) See Seaboard.

smallswordnoun (n.) A light sword used for thrusting only; especially, the sword worn by civilians of rank in the eighteenth century.

soordnoun (n.) Skin of bacon.

sordnoun (n.) See Sward.

swordnoun (n.) An offensive weapon, having a long and usually sharp/pointed blade with a cutting edge or edges. It is the general term, including the small sword, rapier, saber, scimiter, and many other varieties.
 noun (n.) Hence, the emblem of judicial vengeance or punishment, or of authority and power.
 noun (n.) Destruction by the sword, or in battle; war; dissension.
 noun (n.) The military power of a country.
 noun (n.) One of the end bars by which the lay of a hand loom is suspended.

tetrachordnoun (n.) A scale series of four sounds, of which the extremes, or first and last, constituted a fourth. These extremes were immutable; the two middle sounds were changeable.

trichordnoun (n.) An instrument, as a lyre or harp, having three strings.

urochordnoun (n.) The central axis or cord in the tail of larval ascidians and of certain adult tunicates.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH WHÝTFORD (According to first letters):

Rhyming Words According to First 7 Letters (whitfor) - Words That Begins with whitfor:

Rhyming Words According to First 6 Letters (whitfo) - Words That Begins with whitfo:

Rhyming Words According to First 5 Letters (whitf) - Words That Begins with whitf:

whitflawnoun (n.) Whitlow.

Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (whit) - Words That Begins with whit:

whitnoun (n.) The smallest part or particle imaginable; a bit; a jot; an iota; -- generally used in an adverbial phrase in a negative sentence.

whitenoun (n.) The color of pure snow; one of the natural colors of bodies, yet not strictly a color, but a composition of all colors; the opposite of black; whiteness. See the Note under Color, n., 1.
 noun (n.) Something having the color of snow; something white, or nearly so; as, the white of the eye.
 noun (n.) Specifically, the central part of the butt in archery, which was formerly painted white; the center of a mark at which a missile is shot.
 noun (n.) A person with a white skin; a member of the white, or Caucasian, races of men.
 noun (n.) A white pigment; as, Venice white.
 noun (n.) Any one of numerous species of butterflies belonging to Pieris, and allied genera in which the color is usually white. See Cabbage butterfly, under Cabbage.
 superlative (superl.) Reflecting to the eye all the rays of the spectrum combined; not tinted with any of the proper colors or their mixtures; having the color of pure snow; snowy; -- the opposite of black or dark; as, white paper; a white skin.
 superlative (superl.) Destitute of color, as in the cheeks, or of the tinge of blood color; pale; pallid; as, white with fear.
 superlative (superl.) Having the color of purity; free from spot or blemish, or from guilt or pollution; innocent; pure.
 superlative (superl.) Gray, as from age; having silvery hair; hoary.
 superlative (superl.) Characterized by freedom from that which disturbs, and the like; fortunate; happy; favorable.
 superlative (superl.) Regarded with especial favor; favorite; darling.
 verb (v. t.) To make white; to whiten; to whitewash; to bleach.

whitingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of White
 noun (n.) A common European food fish (Melangus vulgaris) of the Codfish family; -- called also fittin.
 noun (n.) A North American fish (Merlucius vulgaris) allied to the preceding; -- called also silver hake.
 noun (n.) Any one of several species of North American marine sciaenoid food fishes belonging to genus Menticirrhus, especially M. Americanus, found from Maryland to Brazil, and M. littoralis, common from Virginia to Texas; -- called also silver whiting, and surf whiting.
 noun (n.) Chalk prepared in an impalpable powder by pulverizing and repeated washing, used as a pigment, as an ingredient in putty, for cleaning silver, etc.

whitebacknoun (n.) The canvasback.

whitebaitnoun (n.) The young of several species of herrings, especially of the common herring, esteemed a great delicacy by epicures in England.
 noun (n.) A small translucent fish (Salanx Chinensis) abundant at certain seasons on the coasts of China and Japan, and used in the same manner as the European whitebait.

whitebeamnoun (n.) The common beam tree of England (Pyrus Aria); -- so called from the white, woolly under surface of the leaves.

whitebeardnoun (n.) An old man; a graybeard.

whitebellynoun (n.) The American widgeon, or baldpate.
 noun (n.) The prairie chicken.

whitebillnoun (n.) The American coot.

whiteblownoun (n.) Same as Whitlow grass, under Whitlow.

whiteboynoun (n.) A favorite.
 adjective (a.) One of an association of poor Roman catholics which arose in Ireland about 1760, ostensibly to resist the collection of tithes, the members of which were so called from the white shirts they wore in their nocturnal raids.

whiteboyismnoun (n.) The conduct or principle of the Whiteboys.

whitecapnoun (n.) The European redstart; -- so called from its white forehead.
 noun (n.) The whitethroat; -- so called from its gray head.
 noun (n.) The European tree sparrow.
 noun (n.) A wave whose crest breaks into white foam, as when the wind is freshening.
 noun (n.) A member of a self-appointed vigilance committee attempting by lynch-law methods to drive away or coerce persons obnoxious to it. Some early ones wore white hoods or masks.

whitecoatnoun (n.) The skin of a newborn seal; also, the seal itself.

whitefishnoun (n.) Any one of several species of Coregonus, a genus of excellent food fishes allied to the salmons. They inhabit the lakes of the colder parts of North America, Asia, and Europe. The largest and most important American species (C. clupeiformis) is abundant in the Great Lakes, and in other lakes farther north. Called also lake whitefish, and Oswego bass.
 noun (n.) The menhaden.
 noun (n.) The beluga, or white whale.

whiteflawnoun (n.) A whitlow.

whiteheadnoun (n.) The blue-winged snow goose.
 noun (n.) The surf scoter.
 noun (n.) A form of self-propelling torpedo.

whitelyadjective (a.) Like, or coming near to, white.

whiteningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whiten
 noun (n.) The act or process of making or becoming white.
 noun (n.) That which is used to render white; whiting.

whitenernoun (n.) One who, or that which, whitens; a bleacher; a blancher; a whitewasher.

whitenessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being white; white color, or freedom from darkness or obscurity on the surface.
 noun (n.) Want of a sanguineous tinge; paleness; as from terror, grief, etc.
 noun (n.) Freedom from stain or blemish; purity; cleanness.
 noun (n.) Nakedness.
 noun (n.) A flock of swans.

whiterumpnoun (n.) The American black-tailed godwit.

whitesnoun (n. pl.) Leucorrh/a.
 noun (n. pl.) The finest flour made from white wheat.
 noun (n. pl.) Cloth or garments of a plain white color.

whitesidenoun (n.) The golden-eye.

whitesmithnoun (n.) One who works in tinned or galvanized iron, or white iron; a tinsmith.
 noun (n.) A worker in iron who finishes or polishes the work, in distinction from one who forges it.

whitesternoun (n.) A bleacher of linen; a whitener; a whitster.

whitetailnoun (n.) The Virginia deer.
 noun (n.) The wheatear.

whitethornnoun (n.) The hawthorn.

whitethroatnoun (n.) Any one of several species of Old World warblers, esp. the common European species (Sylvia cinerea), called also strawsmear, nettlebird, muff, and whitecap, the garden whitethroat, or golden warbler (S. hortensis), and the lesser whitethroat (S. curruca).

whitetopnoun (n.) Fiorin.

whitewallnoun (n.) The spotted flycatcher; -- so called from the white color of the under parts.

whitewashnoun (n.) Any wash or liquid composition for whitening something, as a wash for making the skin fair.
 noun (n.) A composition of line and water, or of whiting size, and water, or the like, used for whitening walls, ceilings, etc.; milk of lime.
 verb (v. t.) To apply a white liquid composition to; to whiten with whitewash.
 verb (v. t.) To make white; to give a fair external appearance to; to clear from imputations or disgrace; hence, to clear (a bankrupt) from obligation to pay debts.
 verb (v. t.) In various games, to defeat (an opponent) so that he fails to score, or to reach a certain point in the game; to skunk.

whitewashingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whitewash

whitewashernoun (n.) One who whitewashes.

whiteweednoun (n.) A perennial composite herb (Chrysanthemum Leucanthemum) with conspicuous white rays and a yellow disk, a common weed in grass lands and pastures; -- called also oxeye daisy.

whitewingnoun (n.) The chaffinch; -- so called from the white bands on the wing.
 noun (n.) The velvet duck.

whitewoodnoun (n.) The soft and easily-worked wood of the tulip tree (Liriodendron). It is much used in cabinetwork, carriage building, etc.

whitewortnoun (n.) Wild camomile.
 noun (n.) A kind of Solomon's seal (Polygonum officinale).

whitishadjective (a.) Somewhat white; approaching white; white in a moderate degree.
 adjective (a.) Covered with an opaque white powder.

whitishnessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being whitish or somewhat white.

whitleathernoun (n.) Leather dressed or tawed with alum, salt, etc., remarkable for its pliability and toughness; white leather.
 noun (n.) The paxwax. See Paxwax.

whitlingnoun (n.) A young full trout during its second season.

whitlowadjective (a.) An inflammation of the fingers or toes, generally of the last phalanx, terminating usually in suppuration. The inflammation may occupy any seat between the skin and the bone, but is usually applied to a felon or inflammation of the periosteal structures of the bone.
 adjective (a.) An inflammatory disease of the feet. It occurs round the hoof, where an acrid matter is collected.

whitmondaynoun (n.) The day following Whitsunday; -- called also Whitsun Monday.

whitneyitenoun (n.) an arsenide of copper from Lake Superior.

whitsonadjective (a.) See Whitsun.

whitsournoun (n.) A sort of apple.

whitsternoun (n.) A whitener; a bleacher; a whitester.

whitsunadjective (a.) Of, pertaining to, or observed at, Whitsuntide; as, Whitsun week; Whitsun Tuesday; Whitsun pastorals.

whitsundaynoun (n.) The seventh Sunday, and the fiftieth day, after Easter; a festival of the church in commemoration of the descent of the Holy Spirit on the day of Pentecost; Pentecost; -- so called, it is said, because, in the primitive church, those who had been newly baptized appeared at church between Easter and Pentecost in white garments.
 noun (n.) See the Note under Term, n., 12.

Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (whi) - Words That Begins with whi:

whichnoun (pron.) A relative pronoun, used esp. in referring to an antecedent noun or clause, but sometimes with reference to what is specified or implied in a sentence, or to a following noun or clause (generally involving a reference, however, to something which has preceded). It is used in all numbers and genders, and was formerly used of persons.
 noun (pron.) A compound relative or indefinite pronoun, standing for any one which, whichever, that which, those which, the . . . which, and the like; as, take which you will.
 adjective (a.) Of what sort or kind; what; what a; who.
 adjective (a.) A interrogative pronoun, used both substantively and adjectively, and in direct and indirect questions, to ask for, or refer to, an individual person or thing among several of a class; as, which man is it? which woman was it? which is the house? he asked which route he should take; which is best, to live or to die? See the Note under What, pron., 1.

whicheveradjective (pron. & a.) Alt. of Whichsoever

whichsoeveradjective (pron. & a.) Whether one or another; whether one or the other; which; that one (of two or more) which; as, whichever road you take, it will lead you to town.

whiffnoun (n.) A sudden expulsion of air from the mouth; a quick puff or slight gust, as of air or smoke.
 noun (n.) A glimpse; a hasty view.
 noun (n.) The marysole, or sail fluke.
 verb (v. t.) To throw out in whiffs; to consume in whiffs; to puff.
 verb (v. t.) To carry or convey by a whiff, or as by a whiff; to puff or blow away.
 verb (v. i.) To emit whiffs, as of smoke; to puff.

whiffingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whiff
 noun (n.) The act of one who, or that which, whiffs.
 noun (n.) A mode of fishing with a hand line for pollack, mackerel, and the like.

whiffetnoun (n.) A little whiff or puff.

whifflingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whiffle

whifflenoun (n.) A fife or small flute.
 verb (v. i.) To waver, or shake, as if moved by gusts of wind; to shift, turn, or veer about.
 verb (v. i.) To change from one opinion or course to another; to use evasions; to prevaricate; to be fickle.
 verb (v. t.) To disperse with, or as with, a whiff, or puff; to scatter.
 verb (v. t.) To wave or shake quickly; to cause to whiffle.

whifflernoun (n.) One who whiffles, or frequently changes his opinion or course; one who uses shifts and evasions in argument; hence, a trifler.
 noun (n.) One who plays on a whiffle; a fifer or piper.
 noun (n.) An officer who went before procession to clear the way by blowing a horn, or otherwise; hence, any person who marched at the head of a procession; a harbinger.
 noun (n.) The golden-eye.

whiffletreenoun (n.) Same as Whippletree.

whignoun (n.) Acidulated whey, sometimes mixed with buttermilk and sweet herbs, used as a cooling beverage.
 noun (n.) One of a political party which grew up in England in the seventeenth century, in the reigns of Charles I. and II., when great contests existed respecting the royal prerogatives and the rights of the people. Those who supported the king in his high claims were called Tories, and the advocates of popular rights, of parliamentary power over the crown, and of toleration to Dissenters, were, after 1679, called Whigs. The terms Liberal and Radical have now generally superseded Whig in English politics. See the note under Tory.
 noun (n.) A friend and supporter of the American Revolution; -- opposed to Tory, and Royalist.
 noun (n.) One of the political party in the United States from about 1829 to 1856, opposed in politics to the Democratic party.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the Whigs.

whiggamorenoun (n.) A Whig; -- a cant term applied in contempt to Scotch Presbyterians.

whiggarchynoun (n.) Government by Whigs.

whiggerynoun (n.) The principles or practices of the Whigs; Whiggism.

whiggishadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to Whigs; partaking of, or characterized by, the principles of Whigs.

whiggismnoun (n.) The principles of the Whigs.

whiglingnoun (n.) A petty or inferior Whig; -- used in contempt.

whilenoun (n.) Space of time, or continued duration, esp. when short; a time; as, one while we thought him innocent.
 noun (n.) That which requires time; labor; pains.
 verb (v. t.) To cause to pass away pleasantly or without irksomeness or disgust; to spend or pass; -- usually followed by away.
 verb (v. i.) To loiter.
  (conj.) During the time that; as long as; whilst; at the same time that; as, while I write, you sleep.
  (conj.) Hence, under which circumstances; in which case; though; whereas.
 prep (prep.) Until; till.

whilingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of While

whilesnoun (n.) Meanwhile; meantime.
 noun (n.) sometimes; at times.
  (conj.) During the time that; while.

whilknoun (n.) A kind of mollusk, a whelk.
 noun (n.) The scoter.
 noun (pron.) Which.

whilomnoun (n.) Formerly; once; of old; erewhile; at times.

whimnoun (n.) The European widgeon.
 noun (n.) A sudden turn or start of the mind; a temporary eccentricity; a freak; a fancy; a capricious notion; a humor; a caprice.
 noun (n.) A large capstan or vertical drum turned by horse power or steam power, for raising ore or water, etc., from mines, or for other purposes; -- called also whim gin, and whimsey.
 verb (v. i.) To be subject to, or indulge in, whims; to be whimsical, giddy, or freakish.

whimbrelnoun (n.) Any one of several species of small curlews, especially the European species (Numenius phaeopus), called also Jack curlew, half curlew, stone curlew, and tang whaup. See Illustration in Appendix.

whimlingnoun (n.) One given to whims; hence, a weak, childish person; a child.

whimmyadjective (a.) Full of whims; whimsical.

whimperingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whimper

whimpernoun (n.) A low, whining, broken cry; a low, whining sound, expressive of complaint or grief.
 verb (v. i.) To cry with a low, whining, broken voice; to whine; to complain; as, a child whimpers.
 verb (v. t.) To utter in alow, whining tone.

whimperernoun (n.) One who whimpers.

whimseynoun (n.) Alt. of Whimsy
 verb (v. t.) To fill with whimseys, or whims; to make fantastic; to craze.

whimsynoun (n.) A whim; a freak; a capricious notion, a fanciful or odd conceit.
 noun (n.) A whim.
 noun (n.) A whimsey.

whimsicaladjective (a.) Full of, or characterized by, whims; actuated by a whim; having peculiar notions; queer; strange; freakish.
 adjective (a.) Odd or fantastic in appearance; quaintly devised; fantastic.

whimsicalitynoun (n.) The quality or state of being whimsical; whimsicalness.

whimsicalnessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being whimsical; freakishness; whimsical disposition.

whimwhamnoun (n.) A whimsical thing; an odd device; a trifle; a trinket; a gimcrack.
 noun (n.) A whim, or whimsey; a freak.

whinnoun (n.) Gorse; furze. See Furze.
 noun (n.) Woad-waxed.
 noun (n.) Same as Whinstone.

whinberrynoun (n.) The English bilberry; -- so called because it grows on moors among the whins, or furze.

whinchatnoun (n.) A small warbler (Pratincola rubetra) common in Europe; -- called also whinchacker, whincheck, whin-clocharet.

whiningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whine

whinenoun (n.) A plaintive tone; the nasal, childish tone of mean complaint; mean or affected complaint.
 verb (v. i.) To utter a plaintive cry, as some animals; to moan with a childish noise; to complain, or to tell of sorrow, distress, or the like, in a plaintive, nasal tone; hence, to complain or to beg in a mean, unmanly way; to moan basely.
 verb (v. t.) To utter or express plaintively, or in a mean, unmanly way; as, to whine out an excuse.

whinernoun (n.) One who, or that which, whines.

whingernoun (n.) A kind of hanger or sword used as a knife at meals and as a weapon.

whinnyingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whinny

whinnynoun (n.) The ordinary cry or call of a horse; a neigh.
 adjective (a.) Abounding in whin, gorse, or furze.
 verb (v. i.) To utter the ordinary call or cry of a horse; to neigh.

whinocknoun (n.) The small pig of a litter.

whinstonenoun (n.) A provincial name given in England to basaltic rocks, and applied by miners to other kind of dark-colored unstratified rocks which resist the point of the pick. -- for example, to masses of chert. Whin-dikes, and whin-sills, are names sometimes given to veins or beds of basalt.

whinyardnoun (n.) A sword, or hanger.
 noun (n.) The shoveler.
 noun (n.) The poachard.

whippingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Whip
  () a & n. from Whip, v.

whipcordnoun (n.) A kind of hard-twisted or braided cord, sometimes used for making whiplashes.


English Words which starts with 'whi' and ends with 'ord':

English Words which starts with 'wh' and ends with 'rd':

wheatbirdnoun (n.) A bird that feeds on wheat, especially the chaffinch.

wheelbirdnoun (n.) The European goatsucker.