Name Report For First Name WINDGATE:

WINDGATE

First name WINDGATE's origin is English. WINDGATE means "from the winding gate". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with WINDGATE below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of windgate.(Brown names are of the same origin (English) with WINDGATE and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with WINDGATE - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming WINDGATE

FIRST NAMES WHICH INCLUDES W›NDGATE AS A WHOLE:

 

NAMES RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 7 Letters (indgate) - Names That Ends with indgate:

Rhyming Names According to Last 6 Letters (ndgate) - Names That Ends with ndgate:

Rhyming Names According to Last 5 Letters (dgate) - Names That Ends with dgate:

Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (gate) - Names That Ends with gate:

agate wingate

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (ate) - Names That Ends with ate:

bradamate ate fate anate cate hecate kate tate mate nate hypate

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (te) - Names That Ends with te:

amanishakhete linette florete maledysaunte tote suette annemette bergitte astarte rute huette josette pierrette yolette bernadette amphitrite anaxarete aphrodite arete calliste hippolyte ocypete tienette vedette volante dete manute baptiste mette dante wambli-waste adette amette amite anjanette anjeanette annette annjeanette antoinette araminte argante ariette ariste arlette babette bemadette bernette bette birte bridgette brigette brigitte brite celeste chante chariste charlette charlotte chaunte clarette colette collette comforte danette davite dawnette diamante elberte ellette enite evette georgette georgitte ginnette hanriette harriette hugette hughette idette ivette jaenette janette jaquenette jeanette jenette johnette jonette

NAMES RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 7 Letters (windgat) - Names That Begins with windgat:

Rhyming Names According to First 6 Letters (windga) - Names That Begins with windga:

Rhyming Names According to First 5 Letters (windg) - Names That Begins with windg:

Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (wind) - Names That Begins with wind:

windell windham windsor

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (win) - Names That Begins with win:

win wincel winchell wine winef winefield winefrith winema winetorp winfield winfred winfrid winfrith winif winifred winifreda winifrid winifride winn winnie winola winona winslow winslowe winsor winston winswod winswode wintanweorth winter winth winthorp winthrop winton winward winwodem winwood

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (wi) - Names That Begins with wi:

wiatt wicasa wiccum wichamm wichell wickam wickley wicleah widad wido wiellaburne wiellaby wielladun wiellaford wiellatun wigburg wigmaere wigman wihakayda wijdan wikimak wikvaya wilbart wilber wilbert wilbur wilburn wilburt wilda wilde wildon wiley wilford wilfr wilfred wilfredo wilfrid wilfryd wilhelm wilhelmina wilhelmine will willa willaburh willamar willan willaperht willard willem willesone willhard william williamon williams williamson willie willifrid willimod willis willmar

NAMES BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE:

First Names which starts with 'win' and ends with 'ate':

First Names which starts with 'wi' and ends with 'te':

First Names which starts with 'w' and ends with 'e':

wade waescburne wagaye waite wake walbridge walbrydge wallace wallache wamblee wande wang'ombe warde ware wareine warrane washbourne washburne wattesone wayde wayne wayte weallere webbe webbestre welborne welcome welsie wendale weslee whitmore wilone wilpe wise wittahere wolfe wulfhere wulfsige wylie wyne wynne wynnie wynwode wythe

English Words Rhyming WINDGATE

ENGLISH WORDS WHICH INCLUDES W›NDGATE AS A WHOLE:



ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE (According to last letters):


Rhyming Words According to Last 7 Letters (indgate) - English Words That Ends with indgate:



Rhyming Words According to Last 6 Letters (ndgate) - English Words That Ends with ndgate:



Rhyming Words According to Last 5 Letters (dgate) - English Words That Ends with dgate:



Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (gate) - English Words That Ends with gate:


ablegatenoun (n.) A representative of the pope charged with important commissions in foreign countries, one of his duties being to bring to a newly named cardinal his insignia of office.
 verb (v. t.) To send abroad.

abrogateadjective (a.) Abrogated; abolished.
 verb (v. t.) To annul by an authoritative act; to abolish by the authority of the maker or his successor; to repeal; -- applied to the repeal of laws, decrees, ordinances, the abolition of customs, etc.
 verb (v. t.) To put an end to; to do away with.

agatenoun (n.) A semipellucid, uncrystallized variety of quartz, presenting various tints in the same specimen. Its colors are delicately arranged in stripes or bands, or blended in clouds.
 noun (n.) A kind of type, larger than pearl and smaller than nonpareil; in England called ruby.
 noun (n.) A diminutive person; so called in allusion to the small figures cut in agate for rings and seals.
 noun (n.) A tool used by gold-wire drawers, bookbinders, etc.; -- so called from the agate fixed in it for burnishing.
 adverb (adv.) On the way; agoing; as, to be agate; to set the bells agate.

aggregatenoun (n.) A mass, assemblage, or sum of particulars; as, a house is an aggregate of stone, brick, timber, etc.
 noun (n.) A mass formed by the union of homogeneous particles; -- in distinction from a compound, formed by the union of heterogeneous particles.
 adjective (a.) Formed by a collection of particulars into a whole mass or sum; collective.
 adjective (a.) Formed into clusters or groups of lobules; as, aggregate glands.
 adjective (a.) Composed of several florets within a common involucre, as in the daisy; or of several carpels formed from one flower, as in the raspberry.
 adjective (a.) Having the several component parts adherent to each other only to such a degree as to be separable by mechanical means.
 adjective (a.) United into a common organized mass; -- said of certain compound animals.
 verb (v. t.) To bring together; to collect into a mass or sum. "The aggregated soil."
 verb (v. t.) To add or unite, as, a person, to an association.
 verb (v. t.) To amount in the aggregate to; as, ten loads, aggregating five hundred bushels.

biconjugateadjective (a.) Twice paired, as when a petiole forks twice.

bijugateadjective (a.) Having two pairs, as of leaflets.

billingsgatenoun (n.) A market near the Billings gate in London, celebrated for fish and foul language.
 noun (n.) Coarsely abusive, foul, or profane language; vituperation; ribaldry.

colligateadjective (a.) Bound together.
 verb (v. t.) To tie or bind together.
 verb (v. t.) To bring together by colligation; to sum up in a single proposition.

congregateadjective (a.) Collected; compact; close.
 verb (v. t.) To collect into an assembly or assemblage; to assemble; to bring into one place, or into a united body; to gather together; to mass; to compact.
 verb (v. i.) To come together; to assemble; to meet.

conjugatenoun (n.) A word agreeing in derivation with another word, and therefore generally resembling it in signification.
 noun (n.) A complex radical supposed to act the part of a single radical.
 adjective (a.) United in pairs; yoked together; coupled.
 adjective (a.) In single pairs; coupled.
 adjective (a.) Containing two or more radicals supposed to act the part of a single one.
 adjective (a.) Agreeing in derivation and radical signification; -- said of words.
 adjective (a.) Presenting themselves simultaneously and having reciprocal properties; -- frequently used in pure and applied mathematics with reference to two quantities, points, lines, axes, curves, etc.
 verb (v. t.) To unite in marriage; to join.
 verb (v. t.) To inflect (a verb), or give in order the forms which it assumed in its several voices, moods, tenses, numbers, and persons.
 verb (v. i.) To unite in a kind of sexual union, as two or more cells or individuals among the more simple plants and animals.

corrugateadjective (a.) Wrinkled; crumpled; furrowed; contracted into ridges and furrows.
 verb (v. t.) To form or shape into wrinkles or folds, or alternate ridges and grooves, as by drawing, contraction, pressure, bending, or otherwise; to wrinkle; to purse up; as, to corrugate plates of iron; to corrugate the forehead.

delegatenoun (n.) Any one sent and empowered to act for another; one deputed to represent; a chosen deputy; a representative; a commissioner; a vicar.
 noun (n.) One elected by the people of a territory to represent them in Congress, where he has the right of debating, but not of voting.
 noun (n.) One sent by any constituency to act as its representative in a convention; as, a delegate to a convention for nominating officers, or for forming or altering a constitution.
 adjective (a.) Sent to act for or represent another; deputed; as, a delegate judge.
 verb (v. t.) To send as one's representative; to empower as an ambassador; to send with power to transact business; to commission; to depute; to authorize.
 verb (v. t.) To intrust to the care or management of another; to transfer; to assign; to commit.

derogatenoun (n.) Diminished in value; dishonored; degraded.
 verb (v. t.) To annul in part; to repeal partly; to restrict; to limit the action of; -- said of a law.
 verb (v. t.) To lessen; to detract from; to disparage; to depreciate; -- said of a person or thing.
 verb (v. i.) To take away; to detract; to withdraw; -- usually with from.
 verb (v. i.) To act beneath one-s rank, place, birth, or character; to degenerate.

divulgateadjective (a.) Published.
 verb (v. t.) To divulge.

dogatenoun (n.) The office or dignity of a doge.

elongateadjective (a.) To lengthen; to extend; to stretch; as, to elongate a line.
 adjective (a.) To remove further off.
 adjective (a.) Drawn out at length; elongated; as, an elongate leaf.
 verb (v. i.) To depart to, or be at, a distance; esp., to recede apparently from the sun, as a planet in its orbit.

erugateadjective (a.) Freed from wrinkles; smooth.

fatigateadjective (a.) Wearied; tired; fatigued.
 verb (v. t.) To weary; to tire; to fatigue.

frigatenoun (n.) Originally, a vessel of the Mediterranean propelled by sails and by oars. The French, about 1650, transferred the name to larger vessels, and by 1750 it had been appropriated for a class of war vessels intermediate between corvettes and ships of the line. Frigates, from about 1750 to 1850, had one full battery deck and, often, a spar deck with a lighter battery. They carried sometimes as many as fifty guns. After the application of steam to navigation steam frigates of largely increased size and power were built, and formed the main part of the navies of the world till about 1870, when the introduction of ironclads superseded them.
 noun (n.) Any small vessel on the water.

fumigatenoun (n.) To apply smoke to; to expose to smoke or vapor; to purify, or free from infection, by the use of smoke or vapors.
 noun (n.) To smoke; to perfume.

fungatenoun (n.) A salt of fungic acid.

gagatenoun (n.) Agate.

gatenoun (n.) A large door or passageway in the wall of a city, of an inclosed field or place, or of a grand edifice, etc.; also, the movable structure of timber, metal, etc., by which the passage can be closed.
 noun (n.) An opening for passage in any inclosing wall, fence, or barrier; or the suspended framework which closes or opens a passage. Also, figuratively, a means or way of entrance or of exit.
 noun (n.) A door, valve, or other device, for stopping the passage of water through a dam, lock, pipe, etc.
 noun (n.) The places which command the entrances or access; hence, place of vantage; power; might.
 noun (n.) In a lock tumbler, the opening for the stump of the bolt to pass through or into.
 noun (n.) The channel or opening through which metal is poured into the mold; the ingate.
 noun (n.) The waste piece of metal cast in the opening; a sprue or sullage piece.
 noun (n.) A way; a path; a road; a street (as in Highgate).
 noun (n.) Manner; gait.
 verb (v. t.) To supply with a gate.
 verb (v. t.) To punish by requiring to be within the gates at an earlier hour than usual.

ingatenoun (n.) Entrance; ingress.
 noun (n.) The aperture in a mold for pouring in the metal; the gate.

interrogatenoun (n.) An interrogation; a question.
 verb (v. t.) To question formally; to question; to examine by asking questions; as, to interrogate a witness.
 verb (v. i.) To ask questions.

laevigateadjective (a.) Having a smooth surface, as if polished.

langatenoun (n.) A linen roller used in dressing wounds.

legatenoun (n.) An ambassador or envoy.
 noun (n.) An ecclesiastic representing the pope and invested with the authority of the Holy See.
 noun (n.) An official assistant given to a general or to the governor of a province.
 noun (n.) Under the emperors, a governor sent to a province.

levigateadjective (a.) Made less harsh or burdensome; alleviated.
 adjective (a.) Made smooth, as if polished.
 verb (v. t.) To make smooth in various senses
 verb (v. t.) To free from grit; to reduce to an impalpable powder or paste.
 verb (v. t.) To mix thoroughly, as liquids or semiliquids.
 verb (v. t.) To polish.
 verb (v. t.) To make smooth in action.
 verb (v. t.) Technically, to make smooth by rubbing in a moist condition between hard surfaces, as in grinding pigments.

multijugateadjective (a.) Having many pairs of leaflets.

outgatenoun (n.) An outlet.

quadrijugateadjective (a.) Same as Quadrijugous.
 adjective (a.) Same as Quadrijugous.

plagateadjective (a.) Having plagae, or irregular enlongated color spots.

plowgatenoun (n.) Alt. of Ploughgate

ploughgatenoun (n.) The Scotch equivalent of the English word plowland.

profligatenoun (n.) An abandoned person; one openly and shamelessly vicious; a dissolute person.
 adjective (a.) Overthrown; beaten; conquered.
 adjective (a.) Broken down in respect of rectitude, principle, virtue, or decency; openly and shamelessly immoral or vicious; dissolute; as, profligate man or wretch.
 verb (v. t.) To drive away; to overcome.

prolegatenoun (n.) The deputy or substitute for a legate.

rugateadjective (a.) Having alternate ridges and depressions; wrinkled.

runagatenoun (n.) A fugitive; a vagabond; an apostate; a renegade. See Renegade.

segregateadjective (a.) Separate; select.
 adjective (a.) Separated from others of the same kind.
 verb (v. t.) To separate from others; to set apart.
 verb (v. i.) To separate from a mass, and collect together about centers or along lines of fracture, as in the process of crystallization or solidification.

strigateadjective (a.) Having transverse bands of color.

subdelegatenoun (n.) A subordinate delegate, or one with inferior powers.
 verb (v. t.) To appoint to act as subdelegate, or as a subordinate; to depete.

subelongateadjective (a.) Not fully elongated; somewhat elongated.

suffragateadjective (a.) To vote or vote with.

surrogatenoun (n.) A deputy; a delegate; a substitute.
 noun (n.) The deputy of an ecclesiastical judge, most commonly of a bishop or his chancellor, especially a deputy who grants marriage licenses.
 noun (n.) In some States of the United States, an officer who presides over the probate of wills and testaments and yield the settlement of estates.
 verb (v. t.) To put in the place of another; to substitute.

tollgatenoun (n.) A gate where toll is taken.

trijugateadjective (a.) In three pairs; as, a trijugate leaf, or a pinnate leaf with three pairs of leaflets.

unijugateadjective (a.) Having but one pair of leaflets; -- said of a pinnate leaf.

virgatenoun (n.) A yardland, or measure of land varying from fifteen to forty acres.
 adjective (a.) Having the form of a straight rod; wand-shaped; straight and slender.

vulgateadjective (a.) An ancient Latin version of the Scripture, and the only version which the Roman Church admits to be authentic; -- so called from its common use in the Latin Church.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the Vulgate, or the old Latin version of the Scriptures.


Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (ate) - English Words That Ends with ate:


abatenoun (n.) Abatement.
 verb (v. t.) To beat down; to overthrow.
 verb (v. t.) To bring down or reduce from a higher to a lower state, number, or degree; to lessen; to diminish; to contract; to moderate; to cut short; as, to abate a demand; to abate pride, zeal, hope.
 verb (v. t.) To deduct; to omit; as, to abate something from a price.
 verb (v. t.) To blunt.
 verb (v. t.) To reduce in estimation; to deprive.
 verb (v. t.) To bring entirely down or put an end to; to do away with; as, to abate a nuisance, to abate a writ.
 verb (v. t.) To diminish; to reduce. Legacies are liable to be abated entirely or in proportion, upon a deficiency of assets.
 verb (v. t.) To decrease, or become less in strength or violence; as, pain abates, a storm abates.
 verb (v. t.) To be defeated, or come to naught; to fall through; to fail; as, a writ abates.

abbreviatenoun (n.) An abridgment.
 adjective (a.) Abbreviated; abridged; shortened.
 adjective (a.) Having one part relatively shorter than another or than the ordinary type.
 verb (v. t.) To make briefer; to shorten; to abridge; to reduce by contraction or omission, especially of words written or spoken.
 verb (v. t.) To reduce to lower terms, as a fraction.

abranchiateadjective (a.) Without gills.

absinthatenoun (n.) A combination of absinthic acid with a base or positive radical.

acaudateadjective (a.) Tailless.

accommodateadjective (a.) Suitable; fit; adapted; as, means accommodate to end.
 verb (v. t.) To render fit, suitable, or correspondent; to adapt; to conform; as, to accommodate ourselves to circumstances.
 verb (v. t.) To bring into agreement or harmony; to reconcile; to compose; to adjust; to settle; as, to accommodate differences, a dispute, etc.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with something desired, needed, or convenient; to favor; to oblige; as, to accommodate a friend with a loan or with lodgings.
 verb (v. t.) To show the correspondence of; to apply or make suit by analogy; to adapt or fit, as teachings to accidental circumstances, statements to facts, etc.; as, to accommodate prophecy to events.
 verb (v. i.) To adapt one's self; to be conformable or adapted.

accumulateadjective (a.) Collected; accumulated.
 verb (v. t.) To heap up in a mass; to pile up; to collect or bring together; to amass; as, to accumulate a sum of money.
 verb (v. i.) To grow or increase in quantity or number; to increase greatly.

accurateadjective (a.) In exact or careful conformity to truth, or to some standard of requirement, the result of care or pains; free from failure, error, or defect; exact; as, an accurate calculator; an accurate measure; accurate expression, knowledge, etc.
 adjective (a.) Precisely fixed; executed with care; careful.

aceratenoun (n.) A combination of aceric acid with a salifiable base.
 adjective (a.) Acerose; needle-shaped.

acervateadjective (a.) Heaped, or growing in heaps, or closely compacted clusters.
 verb (v. t.) To heap up.

acetatenoun (n.) A salt formed by the union of acetic acid with a base or positive radical; as, acetate of lead, acetate of potash.

achatenoun (n.) An agate.
 noun (n.) Purchase; bargaining.
 noun (n.) Provisions. Same as Cates.

achlamydateadjective (a.) Not possessing a mantle; -- said of certain gastropods.

aciculateadjective (a.) Alt. of Aciculated

actuateadjective (a.) Put in action; actuated.
 verb (v. t.) To put into action or motion; to move or incite to action; to influence actively; to move as motives do; -- more commonly used of persons.
 verb (v. t.) To carry out in practice; to perform.

acuateadjective (a.) Sharpened; sharp-pointed.
 verb (v. t.) To sharpen; to make pungent; to quicken.

aculeateadjective (a.) Having a sting; covered with prickles; sharp like a prickle.
 adjective (a.) Having prickles, or sharp points; beset with prickles.
 adjective (a.) Severe or stinging; incisive.

aculeolateadjective (a.) Having small prickles or sharp points.

acuminateadjective (a.) Tapering to a point; pointed; as, acuminate leaves, teeth, etc.
 verb (v. t.) To render sharp or keen.
 verb (v. i.) To end in, or come to, a sharp point.

acutifoliateadjective (a.) Having sharp-pointed leaves.

acutilobateadjective (a.) Having acute lobes, as some leaves.

adequateadjective (a.) Equal to some requirement; proportionate, or correspondent; fully sufficient; as, powers adequate to a great work; an adequate definition.
 adjective (a.) To equalize; to make adequate.
 adjective (a.) To equal.

adnateadjective (a.) Grown to congenitally.
 adjective (a.) Growing together; -- said only of organic cohesion of unlike parts.
 adjective (a.) Growing with one side adherent to a stem; -- a term applied to the lateral zooids of corals and other compound animals.

adulterateadjective (a.) Tainted with adultery.
 adjective (a.) Debased by the admixture of a foreign substance; adulterated; spurious.
 verb (v. t.) To defile by adultery.
 verb (v. t.) To corrupt, debase, or make impure by an admixture of a foreign or a baser substance; as, to adulterate food, drink, drugs, coin, etc.
 verb (v. i.) To commit adultery.

adversifoliateadjective (a.) Alt. of Adversifolious

advocatenoun (n.) One who pleads the cause of another. Specifically: One who pleads the cause of another before a tribunal or judicial court; a counselor.
 noun (n.) One who defends, vindicates, or espouses any cause by argument; a pleader; as, an advocate of free trade, an advocate of truth.
 noun (n.) Christ, considered as an intercessor.
 noun (n.) To plead in favor of; to defend by argument, before a tribunal or the public; to support, vindicate, or recommend publicly.
 verb (v. i.) To act as advocate.

affectionateadjective (a.) Having affection or warm regard; loving; fond; as, an affectionate brother.
 adjective (a.) Kindly inclined; zealous.
 adjective (a.) Proceeding from affection; indicating love; tender; as, the affectionate care of a parent; affectionate countenance, message, language.
 adjective (a.) Strongly inclined; -- with to.

agglomeratenoun (n.) A collection or mass.
 noun (n.) A mass of angular volcanic fragments united by heat; -- distinguished from conglomerate.
 adjective (a.) Alt. of Agglomerated
 verb (v. t.) To wind or collect into a ball; hence, to gather into a mass or anything like a mass.
 verb (v. i.) To collect in a mass.

agglutinateadjective (a.) United with glue or as with glue; cemented together.
 adjective (a.) Consisting of root words combined but not materially altered as to form or meaning; as, agglutinate forms, languages, etc. See Agglutination, 2.
 verb (v. t.) To unite, or cause to adhere, as with glue or other viscous substance; to unite by causing an adhesion of substances.

aggrateadjective (a.) To please.

agminateadjective (a.) Alt. of Agminated

agnatenoun (n.) A relative whose relationship can be traced exclusively through males.
 adjective (a.) Related or akin by the father's side; also, sprung from the same male ancestor.
 adjective (a.) Allied; akin.

alateadjective (a.) Alt. of Alated
 adverb (adv.) Lately; of late.

albuminatenoun (n.) A substance produced by the action of an alkali upon albumin, and resembling casein in its properties; also, a compound formed by the union of albumin with another substance.

alcoatenoun (n.) Alt. of Alcohate

alcohatenoun (n.) Shortened forms of Alcoholate.

alcoholatenoun (n.) A crystallizable compound of a salt with alcohol, in which the latter plays a part analogous to that of water of crystallization.

alienatenoun (n.) A stranger; an alien.
 adjective (a.) Estranged; withdrawn in affection; foreign; -- with from.
 verb (v. t.) To convey or transfer to another, as title, property, or right; to part voluntarily with ownership of.
 verb (v. t.) To withdraw, as the affections; to make indifferent of averse, where love or friendship before subsisted; to estrange; to wean; -- with from.

alkalizateadjective (a.) Alkaline.
 verb (v. t.) To alkalizate.

alloxanatenoun (n.) A combination of alloxanic acid and a base or base or positive radical.

alternatenoun (n.) That which alternates with something else; vicissitude.
 noun (n.) A substitute; one designated to take the place of another, if necessary, in performing some duty.
 noun (n.) A proportion derived from another proportion by interchanging the means.
 adjective (a.) Being or succeeding by turns; one following the other in succession of time or place; by turns first one and then the other; hence, reciprocal.
 adjective (a.) Designating the members in a series, which regularly intervene between the members of another series, as the odd or even numbers of the numerals; every other; every second; as, the alternate members 1, 3, 5, 7, etc. ; read every alternate line.
 adjective (a.) Distributed, as leaves, singly at different heights of the stem, and at equal intervals as respects angular divergence.
 verb (v. t.) To perform by turns, or in succession; to cause to succeed by turns; to interchange regularly.
 verb (v. i.) To happen, succeed, or act by turns; to follow reciprocally in place or time; -- followed by with; as, the flood and ebb tides alternate with each other.
 verb (v. i.) To vary by turns; as, the land alternates between rocky hills and sandy plains.

aluminatenoun (n.) A compound formed from the hydrate of aluminium by the substitution of a metal for the hydrogen.

alveolateadjective (a.) Deeply pitted, like a honeycomb.

amalgamateadjective (a.) Alt. of Amalgamated
 verb (v. t.) To compound or mix, as quicksilver, with another metal; to unite, combine, or alloy with mercury.
 verb (v. t.) To mix, so as to make a uniform compound; to unite or combine; as, to amalgamate two races; to amalgamate one race with another.
 verb (v. i.) To unite in an amalgam; to blend with another metal, as quicksilver.
 verb (v. i.) To coalesce, as a result of growth; to combine into a uniform whole; to blend; as, two organs or parts amalgamate.

ambreatenoun (n.) A salt formed by the combination of ambreic acid with a base or positive radical.

ampliateadjective (a.) Having the outer edge prominent; said of the wings of insects.
 verb (v. t.) To enlarge.

ampullateadjective (a.) Alt. of Ampullated

amygdalatenoun (n.) An emulsion made of almonds; milk of almonds.
 noun (n.) A salt amygdalic acid.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, resembling, or made of, almonds.

amylatenoun (n.) A compound of the radical amyl with oxygen and a positive atom or radical.

anastatenoun (n.) One of a series of substances formed, in secreting cells, by constructive or anabolic processes, in the production of protoplasm; -- opposed to katastate.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE (According to first letters):


Rhyming Words According to First 7 Letters (windgat) - Words That Begins with windgat:



Rhyming Words According to First 6 Letters (windga) - Words That Begins with windga:


windgallnoun (n.) A soft tumor or synovial swelling on the fetlock joint of a horse; -- so called from having formerly been supposed to contain air.


Rhyming Words According to First 5 Letters (windg) - Words That Begins with windg:



Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (wind) - Words That Begins with wind:


windingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wind
 noun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wind
 noun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wind
 noun (n.) A call by the boatswain's whistle.
 noun (n.) A turn or turning; a bend; a curve; flexure; meander; as, the windings of a road or stream.
 noun (n.) A line- or ribbon-shaped material (as wire, string, or bandaging) wound around an object; as, the windings (conducting wires) wound around the armature of an electric motor or generator.
 noun (n.) The material, as wire or rope, wound or coiled about anything, or a single round or turn of the material;
 noun (n.) a series winding, or one in which the armature coil, the field-magnet coil, and the external circuit form a continuous conductor; a shunt winding, or one of such a character that the armature current is divided, a portion of the current being led around the field-magnet coils.
 adjective (a.) Twisting from a direct line or an even surface; circuitous.

windnoun (n.) The act of winding or turning; a turn; a bend; a twist; a winding.
 noun (n.) Air naturally in motion with any degree of velocity; a current of air.
 noun (n.) Air artificially put in motion by any force or action; as, the wind of a cannon ball; the wind of a bellows.
 noun (n.) Breath modulated by the respiratory and vocal organs, or by an instrument.
 noun (n.) Power of respiration; breath.
 noun (n.) Air or gas generated in the stomach or bowels; flatulence; as, to be troubled with wind.
 noun (n.) Air impregnated with an odor or scent.
 noun (n.) A direction from which the wind may blow; a point of the compass; especially, one of the cardinal points, which are often called the four winds.
 noun (n.) A disease of sheep, in which the intestines are distended with air, or rather affected with a violent inflammation. It occurs immediately after shearing.
 noun (n.) Mere breath or talk; empty effort; idle words.
 noun (n.) The dotterel.
 noun (n.) The region of the pit of the stomach, where a blow may paralyze the diaphragm and cause temporary loss of breath or other injury; the mark.
 verb (v. t.) To turn completely, or with repeated turns; especially, to turn about something fixed; to cause to form convolutions about anything; to coil; to twine; to twist; to wreathe; as, to wind thread on a spool or into a ball.
 verb (v. t.) To entwist; to infold; to encircle.
 verb (v. t.) To have complete control over; to turn and bend at one's pleasure; to vary or alter or will; to regulate; to govern.
 verb (v. t.) To introduce by insinuation; to insinuate.
 verb (v. t.) To cover or surround with something coiled about; as, to wind a rope with twine.
 verb (v. i.) To turn completely or repeatedly; to become coiled about anything; to assume a convolved or spiral form; as, vines wind round a pole.
 verb (v. i.) To have a circular course or direction; to crook; to bend; to meander; as, to wind in and out among trees.
 verb (v. i.) To go to the one side or the other; to move this way and that; to double on one's course; as, a hare pursued turns and winds.
 verb (v. t.) To expose to the wind; to winnow; to ventilate.
 verb (v. t.) To perceive or follow by the scent; to scent; to nose; as, the hounds winded the game.
 verb (v. t.) To drive hard, or force to violent exertion, as a horse, so as to render scant of wind; to put out of breath.
 verb (v. t.) To rest, as a horse, in order to allow the breath to be recovered; to breathe.
 verb (v. t.) To blow; to sound by blowing; esp., to sound with prolonged and mutually involved notes.

windagenoun (n.) The difference between the diameter of the bore of a gun and that of the shot fired from it.
 noun (n.) The sudden compression of the air caused by a projectile in passing close to another body.

windasnoun (n.) See 3d Windlass.

windborenoun (n.) The lower, or bottom, pipe in a lift of pumps in a mine.

windboundadjective (a.) prevented from sailing, by a contrary wind. See Weatherbound.

windernoun (n.) One who, or that which, winds; hence, a creeping or winding plant.
 noun (n.) An apparatus used for winding silk, cotton, etc., on spools, bobbins, reels, or the like.
 noun (n.) One in a flight of steps which are curved in plan, so that each tread is broader at one end than at the other; -- distinguished from flyer.
 noun (n.) A blow taking away the breath.
 verb (v. t. & i.) To fan; to clean grain with a fan.
 verb (v. i.) To wither; to fail.

windfallnoun (n.) Anything blown down or off by the wind, as fruit from a tree, or the tree itself, or a portion of a forest prostrated by a violent wind, etc.
 noun (n.) An unexpected legacy, or other gain.

windfallenadjective (a.) Blown down by the wind.

windflowernoun (n.) The anemone; -- so called because formerly supposed to open only when the wind was blowing. See Anemone.

windhovernoun (n.) The kestrel; -- called also windbibber, windcuffer, windfanner.

windinessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being windy or tempestuous; as, the windiness of the weather or the season.
 noun (n.) Fullness of wind; flatulence.
 noun (n.) Tendency to generate wind or gas; tendency to produce flatulence; as, the windiness of vegetables.
 noun (n.) Tumor; puffiness.

windlacenoun (n. & v.) See Windlass.

windlassnoun (n.) A winding and circuitous way; a roundabout course; a shift.
 noun (n.) A machine for raising weights, consisting of a horizontal cylinder or roller moving on its axis, and turned by a crank, lever, or similar means, so as to wind up a rope or chain attached to the weight. In vessels the windlass is often used instead of the capstan for raising the anchor. It is usually set upon the forecastle, and is worked by hand or steam.
 noun (n.) An apparatus resembling a winch or windlass, for bending the bow of an arblast, or crossbow.
 verb (v. i.) To take a roundabout course; to work warily or by indirect means.
 verb (v. t. & i.) To raise with, or as with, a windlass; to use a windlass.

windlenoun (n.) A spindle; a kind of reel; a winch.
 noun (n.) The redwing.

windlessadjective (a.) Having no wind; calm.
 adjective (a.) Wanting wind; out of breath.

windlestraenoun (n.) Alt. of Windlestraw

windlestrawnoun (n.) A grass used for making ropes or for plaiting, esp. Agrostis Spica-ventis.

windmillnoun (n.) A mill operated by the power of the wind, usually by the action of the wind upon oblique vanes or sails which radiate from a horizontal shaft.

windorenoun (n.) A window.

windownoun (n.) An opening in the wall of a building for the admission of light and air, usually closed by casements or sashes containing some transparent material, as glass, and capable of being opened and shut at pleasure.
 noun (n.) The shutter, casement, sash with its fittings, or other framework, which closes a window opening.
 noun (n.) A figure formed of lines crossing each other.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with windows.
 verb (v. t.) To place at or in a window.

windowingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Window

windowedadjective (a.) Having windows or openings.
  (imp. & p. p.) of Window

windowlessadjective (a.) Destitute of a window.

windowpanenoun (n.) See Pane, n., (3) b.
 noun (n.) A thin, spotted American turbot (Pleuronectes maculatus) remarkable for its translucency. It is not valued as a food fish. Called also spotted turbot, daylight, spotted sand flounder, and water flounder.

windowyadjective (a.) Having little crossings or openings like the sashes of a window.

windpipenoun (n.) The passage for the breath from the larynx to the lungs; the trachea; the weasand. See Illust. under Lung.

windrownoun (n.) A row or line of hay raked together for the purpose of being rolled into cocks or heaps.
 noun (n.) Sheaves of grain set up in a row, one against another, that the wind may blow between them.
 noun (n.) The green border of a field, dug up in order to carry the earth on other land to mend it.
 verb (v. t.) To arrange in lines or windrows, as hay when newly made.

windrowingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Windrow

windsornoun (n.) A town in Berkshire, England.

windstormnoun (n.) A storm characterized by high wind with little or no rain.

windtightadjective (a.) So tight as to prevent the passing through of wind.

windwardnoun (n.) The point or side from which the wind blows; as, to ply to the windward; -- opposed to leeward.
 adjective (a.) Situated toward the point from which the wind blows; as, the Windward Islands.
 adverb (adv.) Toward the wind; in the direction from which the wind blows.

windjammernoun (n.) A sailing vessel or one of its crew; -- orig. so called contemptuously by sailors on steam vessels.
 noun (n.) An army bugler or trumpeter; any performer on a wind instrument.


Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (win) - Words That Begins with win:


winningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Win
 noun (n.) The act of obtaining something, as in a contest or by competition.
 noun (n.) The money, etc., gained by success in competition or contest, esp, in gambling; -- usually in the plural.
 noun (n.) A new opening.
 noun (n.) The portion of a coal field out for working.
 adjective (a.) Attracting; adapted to gain favor; charming; as, a winning address.

winadjective (a.) To gain by superiority in competition or contest; to obtain by victory over competitors or rivals; as, to win the prize in a gate; to win money; to win a battle, or to win a country.
 adjective (a.) To allure to kindness; to bring to compliance; to gain or obtain, as by solicitation or courtship.
 adjective (a.) To gain over to one's side or party; to obtain the favor, friendship, or support of; to render friendly or approving; as, to win an enemy; to win a jury.
 adjective (a.) To come to by toil or effort; to reach; to overtake.
 adjective (a.) To extract, as ore or coal.
 verb (v. i.) To gain the victory; to be successful; to triumph; to prevail.

wincingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wince
 noun (n.) The act of washing cloth, dipping it in dye, etc., with a wince.

wincenoun (n.) The act of one who winces.
 noun (n.) A reel used in dyeing, steeping, or washing cloth; a winch. It is placed over the division wall between two wince pits so as to allow the cloth to descend into either compartment. at will.
 verb (v. i.) To shrink, as from a blow, or from pain; to flinch; to start back.
 verb (v. i.) To kick or flounce when unsteady, or impatient at a rider; as, a horse winces.

wincernoun (n.) One who, or that which, winces, shrinks, or kicks.

winceynoun (n.) Linsey-woolsey.

winchnoun (n.) A kick, as of a beast, from impatience or uneasiness.
 noun (n.) A crank with a handle, for giving motion to a machine, a grindstone, etc.
 noun (n.) An instrument with which to turn or strain something forcibly.
 noun (n.) An axle or drum turned by a crank with a handle, or by power, for raising weights, as from the hold of a ship, from mines, etc.; a windlass.
 noun (n.) A wince.
 verb (v. i.) To wince; to shrink; to kick with impatience or uneasiness.

wincopipenoun (n.) A little red flower, no doubt the pimpernel, which, when it opens in the morning, is supposed to bode a fair day. See Pimpernel.

winenoun (n.) The expressed juice of grapes, esp. when fermented; a beverage or liquor prepared from grapes by squeezing out their juice, and (usually) allowing it to ferment.
 noun (n.) A liquor or beverage prepared from the juice of any fruit or plant by a process similar to that for grape wine; as, currant wine; gooseberry wine; palm wine.
 noun (n.) The effect of drinking wine in excess; intoxication.

wineberrynoun (n.) The red currant.
 noun (n.) The bilberry.
 noun (n.) A peculiar New Zealand shrub (Coriaria ruscifolia), in which the petals ripen and afford an abundant purple juice from which a kind of wine is made. The plant also grows in Chili.

winebibbernoun (n.) One who drinks much wine.

wineglassnoun (n.) A small glass from which to drink wine.

winelessadjective (a.) destitute of wine; as, wineless life.

winerynoun (n.) A place where grapes are converted into wine.

wingnoun (n.) One of the two anterior limbs of a bird, pterodactyl, or bat. They correspond to the arms of man, and are usually modified for flight, but in the case of a few species of birds, as the ostrich, auk, etc., the wings are used only as an assistance in running or swimming.
 noun (n.) Any similar member or instrument used for the purpose of flying.
 noun (n.) One of the two pairs of upper thoracic appendages of most hexapod insects. They are broad, fanlike organs formed of a double membrane and strengthened by chitinous veins or nervures.
 noun (n.) One of the large pectoral fins of the flying fishes.
 noun (n.) Passage by flying; flight; as, to take wing.
 noun (n.) Motive or instrument of flight; means of flight or of rapid motion.
 noun (n.) Anything which agitates the air as a wing does, or which is put in winglike motion by the action of the air, as a fan or vane for winnowing grain, the vane or sail of a windmill, etc.
 noun (n.) An ornament worn on the shoulder; a small epaulet or shoulder knot.
 noun (n.) Any appendage resembling the wing of a bird or insect in shape or appearance.
 noun (n.) One of the broad, thin, anterior lobes of the foot of a pteropod, used as an organ in swimming.
 noun (n.) Any membranaceous expansion, as that along the sides of certain stems, or of a fruit of the kind called samara.
 noun (n.) Either of the two side petals of a papilionaceous flower.
 noun (n.) One of two corresponding appendages attached; a sidepiece.
 noun (n.) A side building, less than the main edifice; as, one of the wings of a palace.
 noun (n.) The longer side of crownworks, etc., connecting them with the main work.
 noun (n.) A side shoot of a tree or plant; a branch growing up by the side of another.
 noun (n.) The right or left division of an army, regiment, etc.
 noun (n.) That part of the hold or orlop of a vessel which is nearest the sides. In a fleet, one of the extremities when the ships are drawn up in line, or when forming the two sides of a triangle.
 noun (n.) One of the sides of the stags in a theater.
 noun (n.) Any surface used primarily for supporting a flying machine in flight, whether by edge-on motion, or flapping, or rotation; specif., either of a pair of supporting planes of a flying machine.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with wings; to enable to fly, or to move with celerity.
 verb (v. t.) To supply with wings or sidepieces.
 verb (v. t.) To transport by flight; to cause to fly.
 verb (v. t.) To move through in flight; to fly through.
 verb (v. t.) To cut off the wings of; to wound in the wing; to disable a wing of; as, to wing a bird.

wingingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wing

wingedadjective (a.) Furnished with wings; transported by flying; having winglike expansions.
 adjective (a.) Soaring with wings, or as if with wings; hence, elevated; lofty; sublime.
 adjective (a.) Swift; rapid.
 adjective (a.) Wounded or hurt in the wing.
 adjective (a.) Furnished with a leaflike appendage, as the fruit of the elm and the ash, or the stem in certain plants; alate.
 adjective (a.) Represented with wings, or having wings, of a different tincture from the body.
 adjective (a.) Fanned with wings; swarming with birds.
  (imp. & p. p.) of Wing

wingernoun (n.) One of the casks stowed in the wings of a vessel's hold, being smaller than such as are stowed more amidships.

wingfishnoun (n.) A sea robin having large, winglike pectoral fins. See Sea robin, under Robin.

winglessadjective (a.) Having no wings; not able to ascend or fly.

wingletnoun (n.) A little wing; a very small wing.
 noun (n.) A bastard wing, or alula.

wingmanshipnoun (n.) Power or skill in flying.

wingyadjective (a.) Having wings; rapid.
 adjective (a.) Soaring with wings, or as if with wings; volatile airy.

winkingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Wink

winknoun (n.) The act of closing, or closing and opening, the eyelids quickly; hence, the time necessary for such an act; a moment.
 noun (n.) A hint given by shutting the eye with a significant cast.
 verb (v. i.) To nod; to sleep; to nap.
 verb (v. i.) To shut the eyes quickly; to close the eyelids with a quick motion.
 verb (v. i.) To close and open the eyelids quickly; to nictitate; to blink.
 verb (v. i.) To give a hint by a motion of the eyelids, often those of one eye only.
 verb (v. i.) To avoid taking notice, as if by shutting the eyes; to connive at anything; to be tolerant; -- generally with at.
 verb (v. i.) To be dim and flicker; as, the light winks.
 verb (v. t.) To cause (the eyes) to wink.

winkernoun (n.) One who winks.
 noun (n.) A horse's blinder; a blinker.

winklenoun (n.) Any periwinkle.
 noun (n.) Any one of various marine spiral gastropods, esp., in the United States, either of two species of Fulgar (F. canaliculata, and F. carica).

winnard 2noun (n.) The redwing.

winnebagoesnoun (n.) A tribe of North American Indians who originally occupied the region about Green Bay, Lake Michigan, but were driven back from the lake and nearly exterminated in 1640 by the IIlinnois.

winnernoun (n.) One who wins, or gains by success in competition, contest, or gaming.

winningnessnoun (n.) The quality or state of being winning.

winninishnoun (n.) The land-locked variety of the common salmon.

winnowingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Winnew
 noun (n.) The act of one who, or that which, winnows.

winnewnoun (n.) To separate, and drive off, the chaff from by means of wind; to fan; as, to winnow grain.
 noun (n.) To sift, as for the purpose of separating falsehood from truth; to separate, as had from good.
 noun (n.) To beat with wings, or as with wings.

winnowernoun (n.) One who, or that which, winnows; specifically, a winnowing machine.

winrownoun (n.) A windrow.

winsingadjective (a.) Winsome.

winsomeadjective (a.) Cheerful; merry; gay; light-hearted.
 adjective (a.) Causing joy or pleasure; gladsome; pleasant.

winsomenessnoun (n.) The characteristic of being winsome; attractiveness of manner.

winternoun (n.) The season of the year in which the sun shines most obliquely upon any region; the coldest season of the year.
 noun (n.) The period of decay, old age, death, or the like.
 verb (v. i.) To pass the winter; to hibernate; as, to winter in Florida.
 verb (v. i.) To keep, feed or manage, during the winter; as, to winter young cattle on straw.

winteringnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Winter

wintergreennoun (n.) A plant which keeps its leaves green through the winter.

winterkillingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Winterkill

winterlyadjective (a.) Like winter; wintry; cold; hence, disagreeable, cheerless; as, winterly news.

wintertidenoun (n.) Winter time.

winterweednoun (n.) A kind of speedwell (Veronica hederifolia) which spreads chiefly in winter.

winteryadjective (a.) Wintry.

wintryadjective (a.) Suitable to winter; resembling winter, or what belongs to winter; brumal; hyemal; cold; stormy; wintery.

winyadjective (a.) Having the taste or qualities of wine; vinous; as, grapes of a winy taste.

winzenoun (n.) A small shaft sunk from one level to another, as for the purpose of ventilation.

ENGLISH WORDS BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH W›NDGATE:

English Words which starts with 'win' and ends with 'ate':



English Words which starts with 'wi' and ends with 'te':

wiclifitenoun (n.) Alt. of Wickliffite

wickliffitenoun (n.) See Wyclifite.

willemitenoun (n.) A silicate of zinc, usually occurring massive and of a greenish yellow color, also in reddish crystals (troostite) containing manganese.

witenagemotenoun (n.) A meeting of wise men; the national council, or legislature, of England in the days of the Anglo-Saxons, before the Norman Conquest.

withamitenoun (n.) A variety of epidote, of a reddish color, found in Scotland.

witheritenoun (n.) Barium carbonate occurring in white or gray six-sided twin crystals, and also in columnar or granular masses.