Name Report For First Name DIRK:


First name DIRK's origin is German. DIRK means "people's ruler wealthy. variant of derek and dietrich". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with DIRK below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of dirk.(Brown names are of the same origin (German) with DIRK and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with DIRK - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming DIRK



NAMES RHYMING WITH DÝRK (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (irk) - Names That Ends with irk:

birk kirk

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (rk) - Names That Ends with rk:

afework kevork york clark kerk kyrk mark roark ruark spark park lark berk

NAMES RHYMING WITH DÝRK (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (dir) - Names That Begins with dir:

dirce dirck

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (di) - Names That Begins with di:

dia diahann diahna diamanda diamanta diamante diamon diamond diamonique diamont diamontina dian diana dianda diandra diandre diane dianna diannah dianne diantha dianthe diara diarmaid dibe dice dichali dick dickran dickson didier dido didrika diederich diedre diedrick diega diego dien diep diera dierck dierdre dieter dietrich dietz digna diji dike dikesone dikran dilan dillan dillen dillin dillion dillon dimitrie dimitry dimitur din dina dinadan dinah dinar dinas dino dinora dinorah dinsmore diogo diolmhain diomasach diomedes dion diona diondra diondray diondre dione dionis dionisa dionna dionne dionte dionysia dionysie dionysius dior diorbhall dita diti diu div diva divon divone divsha


First Names which starts with 'd' and ends with 'k':

dack damek darek darick darrick darrock dedrick dedrik delrick dereck derek derick derik derrek derrick derrik deryck deryk deverick domenick dominick dominik dudek

English Words Rhyming DIRK


dirknoun (n.) A kind of dagger or poniard; -- formerly much used by the Scottish Highlander.
 adjective (a.) Dark.
 verb (v. t.) To stab with a dirk.
 verb (v. t.) To darken.

dirkingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Dirk

dirknessnoun (n.) Darkness.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DÝRK (According to last letters):

Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (irk) - English Words That Ends with irk:

birknoun (n.) A birch tree.
 noun (n.) A small European minnow (Leuciscus phoxinus).

firknoun (n.) A freak; trick; quirk.
 verb (v. t.) To beat; to strike; to chastise.
 verb (v. i.) To fly out; to turn out; to go off.

kirknoun (n.) A church or the church, in the various senses of the word; esp., the Church of Scotland as distinguished from other reformed churches, or from the Roman Catholic Church.

mirknoun (n.) Darkness; gloom; murk.
 adjective (a.) Dark; gloomy; murky.

quirknoun (n.) A sudden turn; a starting from the point or line; hence, an artful evasion or subterfuge; a shift; a quibble; as, the quirks of a pettifogger.
 noun (n.) A fit or turn; a short paroxysm; a caprice.
 noun (n.) A smart retort; a quibble; a shallow conceit.
 noun (n.) An irregular air; as, light quirks of music.
 noun (n.) A piece of ground taken out of any regular ground plot or floor, so as to make a court, yard, etc.; -- sometimes written quink.
 noun (n.) A small channel, deeply recessed in proportion to its width, used to insulate and give relief to a convex rounded molding.
 noun (n.) A sudden turn; a starting from the point or line; hence, an artful evasion or subterfuge; a shift; a quibble; as, the quirks of a pettifogger.
 noun (n.) A fit or turn; a short paroxysm; a caprice.
 noun (n.) A smart retort; a quibble; a shallow conceit.
 noun (n.) An irregular air; as, light quirks of music.
 noun (n.) A piece of ground taken out of any regular ground plot or floor, so as to make a court, yard, etc.; -- sometimes written quink.
 noun (n.) A small channel, deeply recessed in proportion to its width, used to insulate and give relief to a convex rounded molding.

shirknoun (n.) One who lives by shifts and tricks; one who avoids the performance of duty or labor.
 verb (v. t.) To procure by petty fraud and trickery; to obtain by mean solicitation.
 verb (v. t.) To avoid; to escape; to neglect; -- implying unfaithfulness or fraud; as, to shirk duty.
 verb (v. i.) To live by shifts and fraud; to shark.
 verb (v. i.) To evade an obligation; to avoid the performance of duty, as by running away.

smirknoun (n.) A forced or affected smile; a simper.
 adjective (a.) Nice,; smart; spruce; affected; simpering.
 verb (v. i.) To smile in an affected or conceited manner; to smile with affected complaisance; to simper.

steenkirknoun (n.) Alt. of Steinkirk

steinkirknoun (n.) A kind of neckcloth worn in a loose and disorderly fashion.
 noun (n.) Same as Steenkirk.

stirknoun (n.) A young bullock or heifer.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DÝRK (According to first letters):

Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (dir) - Words That Begins with dir:

diradiationnoun (n.) The emission and diffusion of rays of light.

directnoun (n.) A character, thus [/], placed at the end of a staff on the line or space of the first note of the next staff, to apprise the performer of its situation.
 adjective (a.) Straight; not crooked, oblique, or circuitous; leading by the short or shortest way to a point or end; as, a direct line; direct means.
 adjective (a.) Straightforward; not of crooked ways, or swerving from truth and openness; sincere; outspoken.
 adjective (a.) Immediate; express; plain; unambiguous.
 adjective (a.) In the line of descent; not collateral; as, a descendant in the direct line.
 adjective (a.) In the direction of the general planetary motion, or from west to east; in the order of the signs; not retrograde; -- said of the motion of a celestial body.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, or effected immediately by, action of the people through their votes instead of through one or more representatives or delegates; as, direct nomination, direct legislation.
 verb (v. t.) To arrange in a direct or straight line, as against a mark, or towards a goal; to point; to aim; as, to direct an arrow or a piece of ordnance.
 verb (v. t.) To point out or show to (any one), as the direct or right course or way; to guide, as by pointing out the way; as, he directed me to the left-hand road.
 verb (v. t.) To determine the direction or course of; to cause to go on in a particular manner; to order in the way to a certain end; to regulate; to govern; as, to direct the affairs of a nation or the movements of an army.
 verb (v. t.) To point out to with authority; to instruct as a superior; to order; as, he directed them to go.
 verb (v. t.) To put a direction or address upon; to mark with the name and residence of the person to whom anything is sent; to superscribe; as, to direct a letter.
 verb (v. i.) To give direction; to point out a course; to act as guide.

directingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Direct

directernoun (n.) One who directs; a director.

directionnoun (n.) The act of directing, of aiming, regulating, guiding, or ordering; guidance; management; superintendence; administration; as, the direction o/ public affairs or of a bank.
 noun (n.) That which is imposed by directing; a guiding or authoritative instruction; prescription; order; command; as, he grave directions to the servants.
 noun (n.) The name and residence of a person to whom any thing is sent, written upon the thing sent; superscription; address; as, the direction of a letter.
 noun (n.) The line or course upon which anything is moving or aimed to move, or in which anything is lying or pointing; aim; line or point of tendency; direct line or course; as, the ship sailed in a southeasterly direction.
 noun (n.) The body of managers of a corporation or enterprise; board of directors.
 noun (n.) The pointing of a piece with reference to an imaginary vertical axis; -- distinguished from elevation. The direction is given when the plane of sight passes through the object.

directiveadjective (a.) Having power to direct; tending to direct, guide, or govern; showing the way.
 adjective (a.) Able to be directed; manageable.

directnessnoun (n.) The quality of being direct; straightness; straightforwardness; immediateness.

directornoun (n.) One who, or that which, directs; one who regulates, guides, or orders; a manager or superintendent.
 noun (n.) One of a body of persons appointed to manage the affairs of a company or corporation; as, the directors of a bank, insurance company, or railroad company.
 noun (n.) A part of a machine or instrument which directs its motion or action.
 noun (n.) A slender grooved instrument upon which a knife is made to slide when it is wished to limit the extent of motion of the latter, or prevent its injuring the parts beneath.

directoratenoun (n.) The office of director; also, a body of directors taken jointly.

directorialadjective (a.) Having the quality of a director, or authoritative guide; directive.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to: director or directory; specifically, relating to the Directory of France under the first republic. See Directory, 3.

directorshipnoun (n.) The condition or office of a director; directorate.

directorynoun (n.) A collection or body of directions, rules, or ordinances; esp., a book of directions for the conduct of worship; as, the Directory used by the nonconformists instead of the Prayer Book.
 noun (n.) A book containing the names and residences of the inhabitants of any place, or of classes of them; an address book; as, a business directory.
 noun (n.) A body of directors; board of management; especially, a committee which held executive power in France under the first republic.
 noun (n.) Direction; guide.
 adjective (a.) Containing directions; enjoining; instructing; directorial.

directressnoun (n.) A woman who directs.

directrixnoun (n.) A directress.
 noun (n.) A line along which a point in another line moves, or which in any way governs the motion of the point and determines the position of the curve generated by it; the line along which the generatrix moves in generating a surface.
 noun (n.) A straight line so situated with respect to a conic section that the distance of any point of the curve from it has a constant ratio to the distance of the same point from the focus.

direfuladjective (a.) Dire; dreadful; terrible; calamitous; woeful; as, a direful fiend; a direful day.

diremptadjective (a.) Divided; separated.
 verb (v. t.) To separate by force; to tear apart.

diremptionnoun (n.) A tearing apart; violent separation.

direnessnoun (n.) Terribleness; horror; woefulness.

direptionnoun (n.) The act of plundering, despoiling, or snatching away.

direptitiousadjective (a.) Characterized by direption.

dirgeadjective (a.) A piece of music of a mournful character, to accompany funeral rites; a funeral hymn.

dirgefuladjective (a.) Funereal; moaning.

dirigenoun (n.) A service for the dead, in the Roman Catholic Church, being the first antiphon of Matins for the dead, of which Dirige is the first word; a dirge.

dirigentnoun (n.) The line of motion along which a describent line or surface is carried in the genesis of any plane or solid figure; a directrix.
 adjective (a.) Directing.

dirigibleadjective (a.) Capable of being directed; steerable; as, a dirigible balloon.

dirimentadjective (a.) Absolute.

dirtnoun (n.) Any foul of filthy substance, as excrement, mud, dust, etc.; whatever, adhering to anything, renders it foul or unclean; earth; as, a wagonload of dirt.
 noun (n.) Meanness; sordidness.
 noun (n.) In placer mining, earth, gravel, etc., before washing.
 verb (v. t.) To make foul of filthy; to dirty.

dirtinessnoun (n.) The state of being dirty; filthiness; foulness; nastiness; baseness; sordidness.

dirtyingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Dirty

diruptionadjective (a.) Disruption.


English Words which starts with 'd' and ends with 'k':

dabchicknoun (n.) A small water bird (Podilymbus podiceps), allied to the grebes, remarkable for its quickness in diving; -- called also dapchick, dobchick, dipchick, didapper, dobber, devil-diver, hell-diver, and pied-billed grebe.

daddocknoun (n.) The rotten body of a tree.

daglocknoun (n.) A dirty or clotted lock of wool on a sheep; a taglock.

daknoun (n.) Post; mail; also, the mail or postal arrangements; -- spelt also dawk, and dauk.

damasknoun (n.) Damask silk; silk woven with an elaborate pattern of flowers and the like.
 noun (n.) Linen so woven that a pattern in produced by the different directions of the thread, without contrast of color.
 noun (n.) A heavy woolen or worsted stuff with a pattern woven in the same way as the linen damask; -- made for furniture covering and hangings.
 noun (n.) Damask or Damascus steel; also, the peculiar markings or "water" of such steel.
 noun (n.) A deep pink or rose color.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, or originating at, the city of Damascus; resembling the products or manufactures of Damascus.
 adjective (a.) Having the color of the damask rose.
 verb (v. t.) To decorate in a way peculiar to Damascus or attributed to Damascus; particularly: (a) with flowers and rich designs, as silk; (b) with inlaid lines of gold, etc., or with a peculiar marking or "water," as metal. See Damaskeen.

danknoun (n.) Moisture; humidity; water.
 noun (n.) A small silver coin current in Persia.
 adjective (a.) Damp; moist; humid; wet.

danskadjective (a.) Danish.

darknoun (n.) Absence of light; darkness; obscurity; a place where there is little or no light.
 noun (n.) The condition of ignorance; gloom; secrecy.
 noun (n.) A dark shade or dark passage in a painting, engraving, or the like; as, the light and darks are well contrasted.
 adjective (a.) Destitute, or partially destitute, of light; not receiving, reflecting, or radiating light; wholly or partially black, or of some deep shade of color; not light-colored; as, a dark room; a dark day; dark cloth; dark paint; a dark complexion.
 adjective (a.) Not clear to the understanding; not easily seen through; obscure; mysterious; hidden.
 adjective (a.) Destitute of knowledge and culture; in moral or intellectual darkness; unrefined; ignorant.
 adjective (a.) Evincing black or foul traits of character; vile; wicked; atrocious; as, a dark villain; a dark deed.
 adjective (a.) Foreboding evil; gloomy; jealous; suspicious.
 adjective (a.) Deprived of sight; blind.
 verb (v. t.) To darken to obscure.

dawknoun (n.) See Dak.
 noun (n.) A hollow, crack, or cut, in timber.
 verb (v. t.) To cut or mark with an incision; to gash.

daybooknoun (n.) A journal of accounts; a primary record book in which are recorded the debts and credits, or accounts of the day, in their order, and from which they are transferred to the journal.

daybreaknoun (n.) The time of the first appearance of light in the morning.

deadlocknoun (n.) A lock which is not self-latching, but requires a key to throw the bolt forward.
 noun (n.) A counteraction of things, which produces an entire stoppage; a complete obstruction of action.

derkadjective (a.) Dark.

derricknoun (n.) A mast, spar, or tall frame, supported at the top by stays or guys, with suitable tackle for hoisting heavy weights, as stones in building.
 noun (n.) The pyramidal structure or tower over a deep drill hole, such as that of an oil well.

desknoun (n.) A table, frame, or case, usually with sloping top, but often with flat top, for the use writers and readers. It often has a drawer or repository underneath.
 noun (n.) A reading table or lectern to support the book from which the liturgical service is read, differing from the pulpit from which the sermon is preached; also (esp. in the United States), a pulpit. Hence, used symbolically for "the clerical profession."
 verb (v. t.) To shut up, as in a desk; to treasure.

deskworknoun (n.) Work done at a desk, as by a clerk or writer.

diestocknoun (n.) A stock to hold the dies used for cutting screws.

dinkadjective (a.) Trim; neat.
 verb (v. t.) To deck; -- often with out or up.

dipchicknoun (n.) See Dabchick.

disknoun (n.) A discus; a quoit.
 noun (n.) A flat, circular plate; as, a disk of metal or paper.
 noun (n.) The circular figure of a celestial body, as seen projected of the heavens.
 noun (n.) A circular structure either in plants or animals; as, a blood disk; germinal disk, etc.
 noun (n.) The whole surface of a leaf.
 noun (n.) The central part of a radiate compound flower, as in sunflower.
 noun (n.) A part of the receptacle enlarged or expanded under, or around, or even on top of, the pistil.
 noun (n.) The anterior surface or oral area of coelenterate animals, as of sea anemones.
 noun (n.) The lower side of the body of some invertebrates, especially when used for locomotion, when it is often called a creeping disk.
 noun (n.) In owls, the space around the eyes.

dobchicknoun (n.) See Dabchick.

docknoun (n.) A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination.
 noun (n.) The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting.
 noun (n.) A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
 noun (n.) An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, -- used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide.
 noun (n.) The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; -- sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock.
 noun (n.) The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.
 verb (v. t.) to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.
 verb (v. t.) To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages.
 verb (v. t.) To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail.
 verb (v. t.) To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc.

dogsickadjective (a.) Sick as a dog sometimes is very sick.

dogtricknoun (n.) A gentle trot, like that of a dog.

domebooknoun (n.) A book said to have been compiled under the direction of King Alfred. It is supposed to have contained the principal maxims of the common law, the penalties for misdemeanors, and the forms of judicial proceedings. Domebook was probably a general name for book of judgments.

doodlesacknoun (n.) The Scotch bagpipe.

doorcheeknoun (n.) The jamb or sidepiece of a door.

dorhawknoun (n.) The European goatsucker; -- so called because it eats the dor beetle. See Goatsucker.

dornicknoun (n.) Alt. of Dornock

dornocknoun (n.) A coarse sort of damask, originally made at Tournay (in Flemish, Doornick), Belgium, and used for hangings, carpets, etc. Also, a stout figured linen manufactured in Scotland.

dorrhawknoun (n.) See Dorhawk.

draglinknoun (n.) A link connecting the cranks of two shafts.
 noun (n.) A drawbar.

dranknoun (n.) Wild oats, or darnel grass. See Drake a plant.
  (imp.) of Drink.
  (imp.) of Drink

drawbacknoun (n.) A loss of advantage, or deduction from profit, value, success, etc.; a discouragement or hindrance; objectionable feature.
 noun (n.) Money paid back or remitted; especially, a certain amount of duties or customs, sometimes the whole, and sometimes only a part, remitted or paid back by the government, on the exportation of the commodities on which they were levied.

drawlinknoun (n.) Same as Drawbar (b).

drillstocknoun (n.) A contrivance for holding and turning a drill.

drinknoun (n.) Liquid to be swallowed; any fluid to be taken into the stomach for quenching thirst or for other purposes, as water, coffee, or decoctions.
 noun (n.) Specifically, intoxicating liquor; as, when drink is on, wit is out.
 verb (v. i.) To swallow anything liquid, for quenching thirst or other purpose; to imbibe; to receive or partake of, as if in satisfaction of thirst; as, to drink from a spring.
 verb (v. i.) To quaff exhilarating or intoxicating liquors, in merriment or feasting; to carouse; to revel; hence, to lake alcoholic liquors to excess; to be intemperate in the /se of intoxicating or spirituous liquors; to tipple.
 verb (v. t.) To swallow (a liquid); to receive, as a fluid, into the stomach; to imbibe; as, to drink milk or water.
 verb (v. t.) To take in (a liquid), in any manner; to suck up; to absorb; to imbibe.
 verb (v. t.) To take in; to receive within one, through the senses; to inhale; to hear; to see.
 verb (v. t.) To smoke, as tobacco.

drocknoun (n.) A water course.

drumsticknoun (n.) A stick with which a drum is beaten.
 noun (n.) Anything resembling a drumstick in form, as the tibiotarsus, or second joint, of the leg of a fowl.

drunknoun (n.) A drunken condition; a spree.
 adjective (a.) Intoxicated with, or as with, strong drink; inebriated; drunken; -- never used attributively, but always predicatively; as, the man is drunk (not, a drunk man).
 adjective (a.) Drenched or saturated with moisture or liquid.
  () of Drink
  (p. p.) of Drink

ducknoun (n.) A pet; a darling.
 noun (n.) A linen (or sometimes cotton) fabric, finer and lighter than canvas, -- used for the lighter sails of vessels, the sacking of beds, and sometimes for men's clothing.
 noun (n.) The light clothes worn by sailors in hot climates.
 verb (v. t.) To thrust or plunge under water or other liquid and suddenly withdraw.
 verb (v. t.) To plunge the head of under water, immediately withdrawing it; as, duck the boy.
 verb (v. t.) To bow; to bob down; to move quickly with a downward motion.
 verb (v. i.) To go under the surface of water and immediately reappear; to dive; to plunge the head in water or other liquid; to dip.
 verb (v. i.) To drop the head or person suddenly; to bow.
 verb (v. t.) Any bird of the subfamily Anatinae, family Anatidae.
 verb (v. t.) A sudden inclination of the bead or dropping of the person, resembling the motion of a duck in water.

dungforknoun (n.) A fork for tossing dung.

dunnockadjective (a.) The hedge sparrow or hedge accentor.

dusknoun (n.) Imperfect obscurity; a middle degree between light and darkness; twilight; as, the dusk of the evening.
 noun (n.) A darkish color.
 adjective (a.) Tending to darkness or blackness; moderately dark or black; dusky.
 verb (v. t.) To make dusk.
 verb (v. i.) To grow dusk.

duykerboknoun (n.) A small South African antelope (Cephalous mergens); -- called also impoon, and deloo.

decknoun (n.) A main aeroplane surface, esp. of a biplane or multiplane.
 verb (v. t.) To cover; to overspread.
 verb (v. t.) To dress, as the person; to clothe; especially, to clothe with more than ordinary elegance; to array; to adorn; to embellish.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with a deck, as a vessel.
 verb (v.) The floorlike covering of the horizontal sections, or compartments, of a ship. Small vessels have only one deck; larger ships have two or three decks.
 verb (v.) The upper part or top of a mansard roof or curb roof when made nearly flat.
 verb (v.) The roof of a passenger car.
 verb (v.) A pack or set of playing cards.
 verb (v.) A heap or store.