Name Report For First Name DITA:

DITA

First name DITA's origins are Slavic and Spanish. DITA means "rich gift" (Slavic) and "abreviation of edith" in Spanish. You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with DITA below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of dita.(Brown names are of the same origin (Slavic,Spanish) with DITA and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with DITA - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming DITA

FIRST NAMES WHICH INCLUDES DİTA AS A WHOLE:

edita tadita

NAMES RHYMING WITH DİTA (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (ita) - Names That Ends with ita:

nashita paharita errita amrita anahita jarita sita kita awinita ayita mankalita tablita tayanita craita luminita voctorita nikita keita mwita vita adelita alita alvarita anita awenita benita bernita birkita bonita brita carlita carmelita carmencita carmita charlita cherita chiquita clarita conshita damita danita davita dolorita donita elita elvita estelita estrellita evita felicita florita hallfrita humita jafita jalita janita jenita jonita jovita juanita julita karmelita laurita lirita lolita lorita lucita lupita malita margarita mariquita melita nerrita nita nurita olita paquita paulita pepita ranita rita shawnita suelita teresita yonita zanita zita amita nakita dumitrita nerita ita ghita sarita kallita

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (ta) - Names That Ends with ta:

aminata binata binta fanta ismitta

NAMES RHYMING WITH DİTA (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (dit) - Names That Begins with dit:

diti

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (di) - Names That Begins with di:

dia diahann diahna diamanda diamanta diamante diamon diamond diamonique diamont diamontina dian diana dianda diandra diandre diane dianna diannah dianne diantha dianthe diara diarmaid dibe dice dichali dick dickran dickson didier dido didrika diederich diedre diedrick diega diego dien diep diera dierck dierdre dieter dietrich dietz digna diji dike dikesone dikran dilan dillan dillen dillin dillion dillon dimitrie dimitry dimitur din dina dinadan dinah dinar dinas dino dinora dinorah dinsmore diogo diolmhain diomasach diomedes dion diona diondra diondray diondre dione dionis dionisa dionna dionne dionte dionysia dionysie dionysius dior diorbhall dirce dirck dirk diu div diva divon divone divsha

NAMES BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH DİTA:

First Names which starts with 'd' and ends with 'a':

dacia dada daena daeva daganya daghda dahlia daiana daina daishya dakota dakshina dalena dalenna dalia daliila dalila damara damia damiana dana danetta dania danica daniela danika danila danitza danja danna dannia dantina danya daphna dar-al-baida dara daracha darcia darda darena darerca daria darissa darla darleena darlena darlina darnesha darnetta darnisha darra davia daviana davianna davida davina davinia davonna dawna dawneshia dawnetta dawnika dayla dayna daysha dayshia dea deana deanda deandra deandrea deandria deanna debora debra decla deeana deeandra deeanna deedra deena deerwa defena deianira deidra deina deirdra deja deka delbina delfina delia delicia delila delinda delisa delisha delissa deliza della

English Words Rhyming DITA

ENGLISH WORDS WHICH INCLUDES DİTA AS A WHOLE:

accreditationnoun (n.) The act of accrediting; as, letters of accreditation.

additamentnoun (n.) An addition, or a thing added.

creditableadjective (a.) Worthy of belief.
 adjective (a.) Deserving or possessing reputation or esteem; reputable; estimable.
 adjective (a.) Bringing credit, reputation, or honor; honorable; as, such conduct is highly creditable to him.

creditablenessnoun (n.) The quality of being creditable.

discreditableadjective (a.) Not creditable; injurious to reputation; disgraceful; disreputable.

ditationnoun (n.) The act of making rich; enrichment.

exhereditationnoun (n.) A disinheriting; disherison.

extraditableadjective (a.) Subject, or liable, to extradition, as a fugitive from justice.
 adjective (a.) Making liable to extradition; as, extraditable offenses.

gaditaniannoun (n.) A native or inhabitant of Cadiz.
 adjective (a.) Of or relating to Cadiz, in Spain.

hereditabilitynoun (n.) State of being hereditable.

hereditableadjective (a.) Capable of being inherited. See Inheritable.
 adjective (a.) Qualified to inherit; capable of inheriting.

hereditamentnoun (n.) Any species of property that may be inherited; lands, tenements, anything corporeal or incorporeal, real, personal, or mixed, that may descend to an heir.

hereditaryadjective (a.) Descended, or capable of descending, from an ancestor to an heir at law; received or passing by inheritance, or that must pass by inheritance; as, an hereditary estate or crown.
 adjective (a.) Transmitted, or capable of being transmitted, as a constitutional quality or condition from a parent to a child; as, hereditary pride, bravery, disease.

meditancenoun (n.) Meditation.

meditatingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Meditate

meditationnoun (n.) The act of meditating; close or continued thought; the turning or revolving of a subject in the mind; serious contemplation; reflection; musing.
 noun (n.) Thought; -- without regard to kind.

meditatistnoun (n.) One who is given to meditation.

meditativeadjective (a.) Disposed to meditate, or to meditation; as, a meditative man; a meditative mood.

quidditativeadjective (a.) Quiddative.
 adjective (a.) Quiddative.

premeditatingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Premeditate

premeditateadjective (a.) Premeditated; deliberate.
 verb (v. t.) To think on, and revolve in the mind, beforehand; to contrive and design previously; as, to premeditate robbery.
 verb (v. i.) To think, consider, deliberate, or revolve in the mind, beforehand.

premeditationnoun (n.) The act of meditating or contriving beforehand; previous deliberation; forethought.

suppeditationnoun (n.) Supply; aid afforded.

tarditationnoun (n.) Tardiness.

uncreditableadjective (a.) Discreditable.

venditationnoun (n.) The act of setting forth ostentatiously; a boastful display.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DİTA (According to last letters):


Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (ita) - English Words That Ends with ita:


acritanoun (n. pl.) The lowest groups of animals, in which no nervous system has been observed.

amritanoun (n.) Immortality; also, the nectar conferring immortality.
 adjective (a.) Ambrosial; immortal.

amanitanoun (n.) A genus of poisonous fungi of the family Agaricaceae, characterized by having a volva, an annulus, and white spores. The species resemble edible mushrooms, and are frequently mistaken for them. Amanita muscaria, syn. Agaricus muscarius, is the fly amanita, or fly agaric; and A. phalloides is the death cup.

coaitanoun (n.) The native name of certain South American monkeys of the genus Ateles, esp. A. paniscus. The black-faced coaita is Ateles ater. See Illustration in Appendix.

incognitanoun (n.) A woman who is unknown or in disguise.
 noun (n.) The state of being in disguise; -- said of a woman.

koaitanoun (n.) Same as Coaita.

manzanitanoun (n.) A name given to several species of Arctostaphylos, but mostly to A. glauca and A. pungens, shrubs of California, Oregon, etc., with reddish smooth bark, ovate or oval coriaceous evergreen leaves, and bearing clusters of red berries, which are said to be a favorite food of the grizzly bear.

mezquitanoun (n.) A mosque.

negritanoun (n.) A blackish fish (Hypoplectrus nigricans), of the Sea-bass family. It is a native of the West Indies and Florida.

neritanoun (n.) A genus of marine gastropods, mostly natives of warm climates.

parasitanoun (n. pl.) An artificial group formerly made for parasitic insects, as lice, ticks, mites, etc.
 noun (n. pl.) A division of copepod Crustacea, having a sucking mouth, as the lerneans. They are mostly parasites on fishes. Called also Siphonostomata.

partitanoun (n.) A suite; a set of variations.

pitanoun (n.) A fiber obtained from the Agave Americana and other related species, -- used for making cordage and paper. Called also pita fiber, and pita thread.
 noun (n.) The plant which yields the fiber.

porpitanoun (n.) A genus of bright-colored Siphonophora found floating in the warmer parts of the ocean. The individuals are round and disk-shaped, with a large zooid in the center of the under side, surrounded by smaller nutritive and reproductive zooids, and by slender dactylozooids near the margin. The disk contains a central float, or pneumatocyst.

praecognitanoun (n. pl.) This previously known, or which should be known in order to understand something else.

sanhitanoun (n.) A collection of vedic hymns, songs, or verses, forming the first part of each Veda.

semitanoun (n.) A fasciole of a spatangoid sea urchin.

se–oritanoun (n.) A Spanish title of courtesy given to a young lady; Miss; also, a young lady.

sortitanoun (n.) The air sung by any of the principal characters in an opera on entering.
 noun (n.) A closing voluntary; a postlude.

trilobitanoun (n. pl.) An extinct order of arthropods comprising the trilobites.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DİTA (According to first letters):


Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (dit) - Words That Begins with dit:


ditnoun (n.) A word; a decree.
 noun (n.) A ditty; a song.
 verb (v. t.) To close up.

ditchnoun (n.) A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.
 noun (n.) Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.
 verb (v. t.) To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches; as, to ditch moist land.
 verb (v. t.) To surround with a ditch.
 verb (v. t.) To throw into a ditch; as, the engine was ditched and turned on its side.
 verb (v. i.) To dig a ditch or ditches.

ditchingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Ditch

ditchernoun (n.) One who digs ditches.

diterebenenoun (n.) See Colophene.

dithecaladjective (a.) Alt. of Dithecous

dithecousadjective (a.) Having two thecae, cells, or compartments.

ditheismnoun (n.) The doctrine of those who maintain the existence of two gods or of two original principles (as in Manicheism), one good and one evil; dualism.

ditheistnoun (n.) One who holds the doctrine of ditheism; a dualist.

ditheisticadjective (a.) Alt. of Ditheistical

ditheisticaladjective (a.) Pertaining to ditheism; dualistic.

dithionicadjective (a.) Containing two equivalents of sulphur; as, dithionic acid.

dithyrambnoun (n.) A kind of lyric poetry in honor of Bacchus, usually sung by a band of revelers to a flute accompaniment; hence, in general, a poem written in a wild irregular strain.

dithyrambicnoun (n.) A dithyrambic poem; a dithyramb.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, or resembling, a dithyramb; wild and boisterous.

dithyrambusnoun (n.) See Dithyramb.

ditionnoun (n.) Dominion; rule.

ditionarynoun (n.) A subject; a tributary.
 adjective (a.) Under rule; subject; tributary.

ditokousadjective (a.) Having two kinds of young, as certain annelids.
 adjective (a.) Producing only two eggs for a clutch, as certain birds do.

ditolylnoun (n.) A white, crystalline, aromatic hydrocarbon, C14H14, consisting of two radicals or residues of toluene.

ditonenoun (n.) The Greek major third, which comprehend two major tones (the modern major third contains one major and one minor whole tone).

ditrichotomousadjective (a.) Divided into twos or threes.
 adjective (a.) Dividing into double or treble ramifications; -- said of a leaf or stem.

ditrocheanadjective (a.) Containing two trochees.

ditrocheenoun (n.) A double trochee; a foot made up of two trochees.

ditroitenoun (n.) An igneous rock composed of orthoclase, elaeolite, and sodalite.

dittnoun (n.) See Dit, n., 2.

dittandernoun (n.) A kind of peppergrass (Lepidium latifolium).

dittanynoun (n.) A plant of the Mint family (Origanum Dictamnus), a native of Crete.
 noun (n.) The Dictamnus Fraxinella. See Dictamnus.
 noun (n.) In America, the Cunila Mariana, a fragrant herb of the Mint family.

dittiedadjective (a.) Set, sung, or composed as a ditty; -- usually in composition.

dittonoun (n.) The aforesaid thing; the same (as before). Often contracted to do., or to two "turned commas" ("), or small marks. Used in bills, books of account, tables of names, etc., to save repetition.
 adverb (adv.) As before, or aforesaid; in the same manner; also.

dittologynoun (n.) A double reading, or twofold interpretation, as of a Scripture text.

ENGLISH WORDS BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH DİTA:

English Words which starts with 'd' and ends with 'a':

daboianoun (n.) A large and highly venomous Asiatic viper (Daboia xanthica).

dactylothecanoun (n.) The scaly covering of the toes, as in birds.

dagobanoun (n.) A dome-shaped structure built over relics of Buddha or some Buddhist saint.

dahlianoun (n.) A genus of plants native to Mexico and Central America, of the order Compositae; also, any plant or flower of the genus. The numerous varieties of cultivated dahlias bear conspicuous flowers which differ in color.

dalmanianoun (n.) A genus of trilobites, of many species, common in the Upper Silurian and Devonian rocks.

dalmaticanoun (n.) Alt. of Dalmatic

damiananoun (n.) A Mexican drug, used as an aphrodisiac.

dammaranoun (n.) An oleoresin used in making varnishes; dammar gum; dammara resin. It is obtained from certain resin trees indigenous to the East Indies, esp. Shorea robusta and the dammar pine.
 noun (n.) A large tree of the order Coniferae, indigenous to the East Indies and Australasia; -- called also Agathis. There are several species.

damosellanoun (n.) Alt. of Damoiselle

daphnianoun (n.) A genus of the genus Daphnia.

darlingtonianoun (n.) A genus of California pitcher plants consisting of a single species. The long tubular leaves are hooded at the top, and frequently contain many insects drowned in the secretion of the leaves.

datanoun (n. pl.) See Datum.
  (pl. ) of Datum

datarianoun (n.) Formerly, a part of the Roman chancery; now, a separate office from which are sent graces or favors, cognizable in foro externo, such as appointments to benefices. The name is derived from the word datum, given or dated (with the indications of the time and place of granting the gift or favor).

daturanoun (n.) A genus of solanaceous plants, with large funnel-shaped flowers and a four-celled, capsular fruit.

decaceratanoun (n. pl.) The division of Cephalopoda which includes the squids, cuttlefishes, and others having ten arms or tentacles; -- called also Decapoda. [Written also Decacera.] See Dibranchiata.

decagynianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean order of plants characterized by having ten styles.

decalcomanianoun (n.) Alt. of Decalcomanie

decandrianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants characterized by having ten stamens.

decapodanoun (n. pl.) The order of Crustacea which includes the shrimps, lobsters, crabs, etc.
 noun (n. pl.) A division of the dibranchiate cephalopods including the cuttlefishes and squids. See Decacera.

deciduanoun (n.) The inner layer of the wall of the uterus, which envelops the embryo, forms a part of the placenta, and is discharged with it.

deciduatanoun (n. pl.) A group of Mammalia in which a decidua is thrown off with, or after, the fetus, as in the human species.

dejectanoun (n. pl.) Excrements; as, the dejecta of the sick.

delendanoun (n. pl.) Things to be erased or blotted out.

delphinoideanoun (n. pl.) The division of Cetacea which comprises the dolphins, porpoises, and related forms.

deltanoun (n.) A tract of land shaped like the letter delta (/), especially when the land is alluvial and inclosed between two or more mouths of a river; as, the delta of the Ganges, of the Nile, or of the Mississippi.
 noun (n.) The fourth letter of the Greek alphabet (/ /), answering to D.
 noun (n.) an object having the shape of the capital /.
 noun (n.) The closed figure produced by connecting three coils or circuits successively, end for end, esp. in a three-phase system; -- often used attributively, as delta winding, delta connection (which see), etc.

dementianoun (n.) Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.

demonomanianoun (n.) A form of madness in which the patient conceives himself possessed of devils.

dendroc/lanoun (n. pl.) A division of the Turbellaria in which the digestive cavity gives off lateral branches, which are often divided into smaller branchlets.

dermanoun (n.) See Dermis.

dermapteranoun (n.) Alt. of Dermapteran

dermobranchiatanoun (n. pl.) A group of nudibranch mollusks without special gills.

dermopteranoun (n. pl.) The division of insects which includes the earwigs (Forticulidae).
 noun (n. pl.) A group of lemuroid mammals having a parachutelike web of skin between the fore and hind legs, of which the colugo (Galeopithecus) is the type. See Colugo.
 noun (n. pl.) An order of Mammalia; the Cheiroptera.

derotrematanoun (n. pl.) The tribe of aquatic Amphibia which includes Amphiuma, Menopoma, etc. They have permanent gill openings, but no external gills; -- called also Cryptobranchiata.

dertrothecanoun (n.) The horny covering of the end of the bill of birds.

desideratanoun (n. pl.) See Desideratum.
  (pl. ) of Desideratum

desmobacterianoun (n. pl.) See Microbacteria.

desmomyarianoun (n. pl.) The division of Tunicata which includes the Salpae. See Salpa.

deuteropathianoun (n.) Alt. of Deuteropathy

deutzianoun (n.) A genus of shrubs with pretty white flowers, much cultivated.

devanoun (n.) A god; a deity; a divine being; an idol; a king.

devatanoun (n.) A deity; a divine being; a good spirit; an idol.

dhoorranoun (n.) Alt. of Dhurra

dhourranoun (n.) Alt. of Dhurra

dhurranoun (n.) Indian millet. See Durra.

diadelphianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants whose stamens are united into two bodies or bundles by their filaments.

diananoun (n.) The daughter of Jupiter and Latona; a virgin goddess who presided over hunting, chastity, and marriage; -- identified with the Greek goddess Artemis.

diandrianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants having two stamens.

diarrheanoun (n.) Alt. of Diarrhoea

diarrhoeanoun (n.) A morbidly frequent and profuse discharge of loose or fluid evacuations from the intestines, without tenesmus; a purging or looseness of the bowels; a flux.

diastemanoun (n.) A vacant space, or gap, esp. between teeth in a jaw.

diatrymanoun (n.) An extinct eocene bird from New Mexico, larger than the ostrich.

dibranchiatanoun (n. pl.) An order of cephalopods which includes those with two gills, an apparatus for emitting an inky fluid, and either eight or ten cephalic arms bearing suckers or hooks, as the octopi and squids. See Cephalopoda.

dicentranoun (n.) A genus of herbaceous plants, with racemes of two-spurred or heart-shaped flowers, including the Dutchman's breeches, and the more showy Bleeding heart (D. spectabilis).

dictanoun (n. pl.) See Dictum.
  (pl. ) of Dictum

dicyematanoun (n. pl.) An order of worms parasitic in cephalopods. They are remarkable for the extreme simplicity of their structure. The embryo exists in two forms.

didelphianoun (n. pl.) The subclass of Mammalia which includes the marsupials. See Marsupialia.

didonianoun (n.) The curve which on a given surface and with a given perimeter contains the greatest area.

didrachmanoun (n.) A two-drachma piece; an ancient Greek silver coin, worth nearly forty cents.

didynamianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants having four stamens disposed in pairs of unequal length.

dielytranoun (n.) See Dicentra.

differentianoun (n.) The formal or distinguishing part of the essence of a species; the characteristic attribute of a species; specific difference.

digammanoun (n.) A letter (/, /) of the Greek alphabet, which early fell into disuse.

digeneanoun (n. pl.) A division of Trematoda in which alternate generations occur, the immediate young not resembling their parents.

digynianoun (n.) A Linnaean order of plants having two styles.

dikanoun (n.) A kind of food, made from the almondlike seeds of the Irvingia Barteri, much used by natives of the west coast of Africa; -- called also dika bread.

dilemmanoun (n.) An argument which presents an antagonist with two or more alternatives, but is equally conclusive against him, whichever alternative he chooses.
 noun (n.) A state of things in which evils or obstacles present themselves on every side, and it is difficult to determine what course to pursue; a vexatious alternative or predicament; a difficult choice or position.

dimeranoun (n. pl.) A division of Coleoptera, having two joints to the tarsi.
 noun (n. pl.) A division of the Hemiptera, including the aphids.

dimyanoun (n. pl.) Alt. of Dimyaria

dimyarianoun (n. pl.) An order of lamellibranchiate mollusks having an anterior and posterior adductor muscle, as the common clam. See Bivalve.

dinosaurianoun (n. pl.) An order of extinct mesozoic reptiles, mostly of large size (whence the name). Notwithstanding their size, they present birdlike characters in the skeleton, esp. in the pelvis and hind limbs. Some walked on their three-toed hind feet, thus producing the large "bird tracks," so-called, of mesozoic sandstones; others were five-toed and quadrupedal. See Illust. of Compsognathus, also Illustration of Dinosaur in Appendix.

dioecianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants having the stamens and pistils on different plants.
 noun (n. pl.) A subclass of gastropod mollusks in which the sexes are separate. It includes most of the large marine species, like the conchs, cones, and cowries.

diomedeanoun (n.) A genus of large sea birds, including the albatross. See Albatross.

dionaeanoun (n.) An insectivorous plant. See Venus's flytrap.

dioptranoun (n.) An optical instrument, invented by Hipparchus, for taking altitudes, leveling, etc.

dioramanoun (n.) A mode of scenic representation, invented by Daguerre and Bouton, in which a painting is seen from a distance through a large opening. By a combination of transparent and opaque painting, and of transmitted and reflected light, and by contrivances such as screens and shutters, much diversity of scenic effect is produced.
 noun (n.) A building used for such an exhibition.

dioscoreanoun (n.) A genus of plants. See Yam.

diotanoun (n.) A vase or drinking cup having two handles or ears.

diphtherianoun (n.) A very dangerous contagious disease in which the air passages, and especially the throat, become coated with a false membrane, produced by the solidification of an inflammatory exudation. Cf. Group.

diplomanoun (n.) A letter or writing, usually under seal, conferring some privilege, honor, or power; a document bearing record of a degree conferred by a literary society or educational institution.

diplopianoun (n.) Alt. of Diplopy

diplopodanoun (n. pl.) An order of myriapods having two pairs of legs on each segment; the Chilognatha.

dipneumonanoun (n. pl.) A group of spiders having only two lunglike organs.

dipsomanianoun (n.) A morbid an uncontrollable craving (often periodic) for drink, esp. for alcoholic liquors; also improperly used to denote acute and chronic alcoholism.

dipteranoun (n. pl.) An extensive order of insects having only two functional wings and two balancers, as the house fly, mosquito, etc. They have a suctorial proboscis, often including two pairs of sharp organs (mandibles and maxillae) with which they pierce the skin of animals. They undergo a complete metamorphosis, their larvae (called maggots) being usually without feet.

discinanoun (n.) A genus of Branchiopoda, having a disklike shell, attached by one valve, which is perforated by the peduncle.

discodactylianoun (n. pl.) A division of amphibians having suctorial disks on the toes, as the tree frogs.

discophoranoun (n. pl.) A division of acalephs or jellyfishes, including most of the large disklike species.

distomanoun (n.) A genus of parasitic, trematode worms, having two suckers for attaching themselves to the part they infest. See 1st Fluke, 2.

diurnanoun (n. pl.) A division of Lepidoptera, including the butterflies; -- so called because they fly only in the daytime.

docoglossanoun (n. pl.) An order of gastropods, including the true limpets, and having the teeth on the odontophore or lingual ribbon.

dodecagynianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean order of plants having twelve styles.

dodecandrianoun (n. pl.) A Linnaean class of plants including all that have any number of stamens between twelve and nineteen.

dogmanoun (n.) That which is held as an opinion; a tenet; a doctrine.
 noun (n.) A formally stated and authoritatively settled doctrine; a definite, established, and authoritative tenet.
 noun (n.) A doctrinal notion asserted without regard to evidence or truth; an arbitrary dictum.

dolabranoun (n.) A rude ancient ax or hatchet, seen in museums.

dominanoun (n.) Lady; a lady; -- a title formerly given to noble ladies who held a barony in their own right.

do–anoun (n.) Lady; mistress; madam; -- a title of respect used in Spain, prefixed to the Christian name of a lady.

doncellanoun (n.) A handsome fish of Florida and the West Indies (Platyglossus radiatus). The name is applied also to the ladyfish (Harpe rufa) of the same region.

donnanoun (n.) A lady; madam; mistress; -- the title given a lady in Italy.

doorganoun (n.) A Hindoo divinity, the consort of Siva, represented with ten arms.

dorsibranchiatanoun (n. pl.) A division of chaetopod annelids in which the branchiae are along the back, on each side, or on the parapodia. [See Illusts. under Annelida and Chaetopoda.]