Name Report For First Name MITCH:

MITCH

First name MITCH's origin is English. MITCH means "form of michael who is like god". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with MITCH below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of mitch.(Brown names are of the same origin (English) with MITCH and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with MITCH - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming MITCH

FIRST NAMES WHICH INCLUDES M›TCH AS A WHOLE:

mitchell mitchel

NAMES RHYMING WITH M›TCH (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (itch) - Names That Ends with itch:

fitch

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (tch) - Names That Ends with tch:

fytch dutch

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (ch) - Names That Ends with ch:

adanech laoidheach toirdealbach vach coaxoch xiloxoch bich abdimelech cynfarch rhydderch conlaoch culhwch gwernach matholwch twrch uisnech bearach coigleach coilleach deasach ealadhach muireach toirdealbhach erich friedrich heinrich baruch cailleach deoch luighseach moireach rioghnach abimelech abukcheech aldrich bailoch birch buach calbhach carthach ceallach ceardach cearnach clach cruadhlaoich darach darroch deutsch dietrich enoch feich keallach kellach muireadhach murdoch nathrach nixkamich parisch pesach pessach raleich rich seanlaoch searbhreathach shadrach tearlach tiarchnach tighearnach treasach welch zach noach avimelech ulrich diederich raghallach rabhartach leamhnach fionnlaoch dubhthach dubhloach diomasach choilleich clunainach cleirach bradach roch lach burch usenech aballach cathasach blanch yuroch gerlach upchurch gwenhwyfach

NAMES RHYMING WITH M›TCH (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (mitc) - Names That Begins with mitc:

mitcbel

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (mit) - Names That Begins with mit:

mitsu mituna mitzi

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (mi) - Names That Begins with mi:

mia miakoda micaden micaela micah micaiah mical michael michaela michaele michaelina michaeline michaelyn michal michalin michayla micheal micheala micheil michel michela michele micheline michella michelle michie michiko michio michon mick mickey micole midas mide midori mieko mielikki mieze migina migisi mignon mignonette miguel mihaela mihai mihaly mika mika'il mikael mikaela mikaia mikala mikayla mike mikeal mikel mikele mikella mikelle mikenna mikeya mikhail mikhaila mikhalis mikhos miki mikil mikio mikkah mikkel mikki mikko mikolas mikolaus mila milaan milada milagritos milagros milagrosa milan milana milani milap milburn milbyrne milcah mildraed mildread mildred mildri mildrid mildryd miles miley milford

NAMES BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH M›TCH:

First Names which starts with 'mi' and ends with 'ch':

First Names which starts with 'm' and ends with 'h':

ma'isah macadhamh macbeth macdaibhidh macdhubh macintosh mackintosh macmaureadhaigh madihah maegth mahkah mahuizoh maizah majidah makaylah malcah maleah malkah mallaidh mamdouh manikah mannleah maoldhomhnaigh maonaigh marah maralah margrith mariah maridith marineth marleigh marsh math matoskah mawiyah mayah maymunah mayyadah mckaylah meadghbh meadhbh menachemah menassah mensah meredith milosh mimiteh minh minkah minninnewah misbah mokatavatah month moriah morogh mosheh msrah mu'adh mu'awiyah mufidah muhjah muircheartaigh muminah munirah murchadh murrough murtagh murtaugh mushirah muslimah myah myrah

English Words Rhyming MITCH

ENGLISH WORDS WHICH INCLUDES M›TCH AS A WHOLE:



ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH M›TCH (According to last letters):


Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (itch) - English Words That Ends with itch:


aitchnoun (n.) The letter h or H.

backstitchnoun (n.) A stitch made by setting the needle back of the end of the last stitch, and bringing it out in front of the end.
 verb (v. i.) To sew with backstitches; as, to backstitch a seam.

bitchnoun (n.) The female of the canine kind, as of the dog, wolf, and fox.
 noun (n.) An opprobrious name for a woman, especially a lewd woman.

cowitchnoun (n.) See Cowhage.

ditchnoun (n.) A trench made in the earth by digging, particularly a trench for draining wet land, for guarding or fencing inclosures, or for preventing an approach to a town or fortress. In the latter sense, it is called also a moat or a fosse.
 noun (n.) Any long, narrow receptacle for water on the surface of the earth.
 verb (v. t.) To dig a ditch or ditches in; to drain by a ditch or ditches; as, to ditch moist land.
 verb (v. t.) To surround with a ditch.
 verb (v. t.) To throw into a ditch; as, the engine was ditched and turned on its side.
 verb (v. i.) To dig a ditch or ditches.

eldritchadjective (a.) Hideous; ghastly; as, an eldritch shriek or laugh.

elritchadjective (a.) Ghastly; preternatural. Same as Eldritch.

fitchnoun (n.) A vetch.
 noun (n.) A word found in the Authorized Version of the Bible, representing different Hebrew originals. In Isaiah xxviii. 25, 27, it means the black aromatic seeds of Nigella sativa, still used as a flavoring in the East. In Ezekiel iv. 9, the Revised Version now reads spelt.
 noun (n.) The European polecat; also, its fur.

flitchnoun (n.) The side of a hog salted and cured; a side of bacon.
 noun (n.) One of several planks, smaller timbers, or iron plates, which are secured together, side by side, to make a large girder or built beam.
 noun (n.) The outside piece of a sawed log; a slab.
 noun (n.) To cut into, or off in, flitches or strips; as, to flitch logs; to flitch bacon.

featherstitchnoun (n.) A kind of embroidery stitch producing a branching zigzag line.

hitchnoun (n.) A catch; anything that holds, as a hook; an impediment; an obstacle; an entanglement.
 noun (n.) The act of catching, as on a hook, etc.
 noun (n.) A stop or sudden halt; a stoppage; an impediment; a temporary obstruction; an obstacle; as, a hitch in one's progress or utterance; a hitch in the performance.
 noun (n.) A sudden movement or pull; a pull up; as, the sailor gave his trousers a hitch.
 noun (n.) A knot or noose in a rope which can be readily undone; -- intended for a temporary fastening; as, a half hitch; a clove hitch; a timber hitch, etc.
 noun (n.) A small dislocation of a bed or vein.
 verb (v. t.) To become entangled or caught; to be linked or yoked; to unite; to cling.
 verb (v. t.) To move interruptedly or with halts, jerks, or steps; -- said of something obstructed or impeded.
 verb (v. t.) To hit the legs together in going, as horses; to interfere.
 verb (v. t.) To hook; to catch or fasten as by a hook or a knot; to make fast, unite, or yoke; as, to hitch a horse, or a halter.
 verb (v. t.) To move with hitches; as, he hitched his chair nearer.

itchnoun (n.) An eruption of small, isolated, acuminated vesicles, produced by the entrance of a parasitic mite (the Sarcoptes scabei), and attended with itching. It is transmissible by contact.
 noun (n.) Any itching eruption.
 noun (n.) A sensation in the skin occasioned (or resembling that occasioned) by the itch eruption; -- called also scabies, psora, etc.
 noun (n.) A constant irritating desire.
 verb (v. i.) To have an uneasy sensation in the skin, which inclines the person to scratch the part affected.
 verb (v. i.) To have a constant desire or teasing uneasiness; to long for; as, itching ears.

knitchnoun (n.) Alt. of Knitchet

quitchnoun (n.) Same as Quitch grass.
 noun (n.) Figuratively: A vice; a taint; an evil.
 noun (n.) Same as Quitch grass.
 noun (n.) Figuratively: A vice; a taint; an evil.

pitchnoun (n.) A thick, black, lustrous, and sticky substance obtained by boiling down tar. It is used in calking the seams of ships; also in coating rope, canvas, wood, ironwork, etc., to preserve them.
 noun (n.) See Pitchstone.
 noun (n.) To cover over or smear with pitch.
 noun (n.) Fig.: To darken; to blacken; to obscure.
 noun (n.) A throw; a toss; a cast, as of something from the hand; as, a good pitch in quoits.
 noun (n.) That point of the ground on which the ball pitches or lights when bowled.
 noun (n.) A point or peak; the extreme point or degree of elevation or depression; hence, a limit or bound.
 noun (n.) Height; stature.
 noun (n.) A descent; a fall; a thrusting down.
 noun (n.) The point where a declivity begins; hence, the declivity itself; a descending slope; the degree or rate of descent or slope; slant; as, a steep pitch in the road; the pitch of a roof.
 noun (n.) The relative acuteness or gravity of a tone, determined by the number of vibrations which produce it; the place of any tone upon a scale of high and low.
 noun (n.) The limit of ground set to a miner who receives a share of the ore taken out.
 noun (n.) The distance from center to center of any two adjacent teeth of gearing, measured on the pitch line; -- called also circular pitch.
 noun (n.) The length, measured along the axis, of a complete turn of the thread of a screw, or of the helical lines of the blades of a screw propeller.
 noun (n.) The distance between the centers of holes, as of rivet holes in boiler plates.
 noun (n.) The distance between symmetrically arranged or corresponding parts of an armature, measured along a line, called the pitch line, drawn around its length. Sometimes half of this distance is called the pitch.
 verb (v. t.) To throw, generally with a definite aim or purpose; to cast; to hurl; to toss; as, to pitch quoits; to pitch hay; to pitch a ball.
 verb (v. t.) To thrust or plant in the ground, as stakes or poles; hence, to fix firmly, as by means of poles; to establish; to arrange; as, to pitch a tent; to pitch a camp.
 verb (v. t.) To set, face, or pave with rubble or undressed stones, as an embankment or a roadway.
 verb (v. t.) To fix or set the tone of; as, to pitch a tune.
 verb (v. t.) To set or fix, as a price or value.
 verb (v. i.) To fix or place a tent or temporary habitation; to encamp.
 verb (v. i.) To light; to settle; to come to rest from flight.
 verb (v. i.) To fix one's choise; -- with on or upon.
 verb (v. i.) To plunge or fall; esp., to fall forward; to decline or slope; as, to pitch from a precipice; the vessel pitches in a heavy sea; the field pitches toward the east.

pritchnoun (n.) A sharp-pointed instrument; also, an eelspear.
 noun (n.) Pique; offense.

scritchnoun (n.) A screech.

switchnoun (n.) A small, flexible twig or rod.
 noun (n.) A movable part of a rail; or of opposite rails, for transferring cars from one track to another.
 noun (n.) A separate mass or trees of hair, or of some substance (at jute) made to resemble hair, worn on the head by women.
 noun (n.) A mechanical device for shifting an electric current to another circuit.
 noun (n.) A device for shifting an electric current to another circuit, or for making and breaking a circuit.
 verb (v. t.) To strike with a switch or small flexible rod; to whip.
 verb (v. t.) To swing or whisk; as, to switch a cane.
 verb (v. t.) To trim, as, a hedge.
 verb (v. t.) To turn from one railway track to another; to transfer by a switch; -- generally with off, from, etc.; as, to switch off a train; to switch a car from one track to another.
 verb (v. t.) To shift to another circuit.
 verb (v. i.) To walk with a jerk.

stitchnoun (n.) An arrangement of stitches, or method of stitching in some particular way or style; as, cross-stitch; herringbone stitch, etc.
 verb (v. i.) A single pass of a needle in sewing; the loop or turn of the thread thus made.
 verb (v. i.) A single turn of the thread round a needle in knitting; a link, or loop, of yarn; as, to let down, or drop, a stitch; to take up a stitch.
 verb (v. i.) A space of work taken up, or gone over, in a single pass of the needle; hence, by extension, any space passed over; distance.
 verb (v. i.) A local sharp pain; an acute pain, like the piercing of a needle; as, a stitch in the side.
 verb (v. i.) A contortion, or twist.
 verb (v. i.) Any least part of a fabric or dress; as, to wet every stitch of clothes.
 verb (v. i.) A furrow.
 verb (v. t.) To form stitches in; especially, to sew in such a manner as to show on the surface a continuous line of stitches; as, to stitch a shirt bosom.
 verb (v. t.) To sew, or unite together by stitches; as, to stitch printed sheets in making a book or a pamphlet.
 verb (v. t.) To form land into ridges.
 verb (v. i.) To practice stitching, or needlework.

twitchnoun (n.) The act of twitching; a pull with a jerk; a short, sudden, quick pull; as, a twitch by the sleeve.
 noun (n.) A short, spastic contraction of the fibers or muscles; a simple muscular contraction; as, convulsive twitches; a twitch in the side.
 noun (n.) A stick with a hole in one end through which passes a loop, which can be drawn tightly over the upper lip or an ear of a horse. By twisting the stick the compression is made sufficiently painful to keep the animal quiet during a slight surgical operation.
 verb (v. t.) To pull with a sudden jerk; to pluck with a short, quick motion; to snatch; as, to twitch one by the sleeve; to twitch a thing out of another's hand; to twitch off clusters of grapes.

whipstitchnoun (n.) A tailor; -- so called in contempt.
 noun (n.) Anything hastily put or stitched together; hence, a hasty composition.
 noun (n.) The act or process of whipstitching.
 noun (n.) A small bit; esp., a small interval of time; an instant; a minute.
 verb (v. t.) To rafter; to plow in ridges, as land.
 verb (v. t.) To sew by passing the thread over and over; to overcast; whip.

witchnoun (n.) A cone of paper which is placed in a vessel of lard or other fat, and used as a taper.
 noun (n.) One who practices the black art, or magic; one regarded as possessing supernatural or magical power by compact with an evil spirit, esp. with the Devil; a sorcerer or sorceress; -- now applied chiefly or only to women, but formerly used of men as well.
 noun (n.) An ugly old woman; a hag.
 noun (n.) One who exercises more than common power of attraction; a charming or bewitching person; also, one given to mischief; -- said especially of a woman or child.
 noun (n.) A certain curve of the third order, described by Maria Agnesi under the name versiera.
 noun (n.) The stormy petrel.
 verb (v. t.) To bewitch; to fascinate; to enchant.


Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (tch) - English Words That Ends with tch:


blotchadjective (a.) A blot or spot, as of color or of ink; especially a large or irregular spot. Also Fig.; as, a moral blotch.
 adjective (a.) A large pustule, or a coarse eruption.

botchnoun (n.) A swelling on the skin; a large ulcerous affection; a boil; an eruptive disease.
 noun (n.) A patch put on, or a part of a garment patched or mended in a clumsy manner.
 noun (n.) Work done in a bungling manner; a clumsy performance; a piece of work, or a place in work, marred in the doing, or not properly finished; a bungle.
 noun (n.) To mark with, or as with, botches.
 noun (n.) To repair; to mend; esp. to patch in a clumsy or imperfect manner, as a garment; -- sometimes with up.
 noun (n.) To put together unsuitably or unskillfully; to express or perform in a bungling manner; to spoil or mar, as by unskillful work.

catchnoun (n.) Act of seizing; a grasp.
 noun (n.) That by which anything is caught or temporarily fastened; as, the catch of a gate.
 noun (n.) The posture of seizing; a state of preparation to lay hold of, or of watching he opportunity to seize; as, to lie on the catch.
 noun (n.) That which is caught or taken; profit; gain; especially, the whole quantity caught or taken at one time; as, a good catch of fish.
 noun (n.) Something desirable to be caught, esp. a husband or wife in matrimony.
 noun (n.) Passing opportunities seized; snatches.
 noun (n.) A slight remembrance; a trace.
 noun (n.) A humorous canon or round, so contrived that the singers catch up each other's words.
 verb (v. t.) To lay hold on; to seize, especially with the hand; to grasp (anything) in motion, with the effect of holding; as, to catch a ball.
 verb (v. t.) To seize after pursuing; to arrest; as, to catch a thief.
 verb (v. t.) To take captive, as in a snare or net, or on a hook; as, to catch a bird or fish.
 verb (v. t.) Hence: To insnare; to entangle.
 verb (v. t.) To seize with the senses or the mind; to apprehend; as, to catch a melody.
 verb (v. t.) To communicate to; to fasten upon; as, the fire caught the adjoining building.
 verb (v. t.) To engage and attach; to please; to charm.
 verb (v. t.) To get possession of; to attain.
 verb (v. t.) To take or receive; esp. to take by sympathy, contagion, infection, or exposure; as, to catch the spirit of an occasion; to catch the measles or smallpox; to catch cold; the house caught fire.
 verb (v. t.) To come upon unexpectedly or by surprise; to find; as, to catch one in the act of stealing.
 verb (v. t.) To reach in time; to come up with; as, to catch a train.
 verb (v. i.) To attain possession.
 verb (v. i.) To be held or impeded by entanglement or a light obstruction; as, a kite catches in a tree; a door catches so as not to open.
 verb (v. i.) To take hold; as, the bolt does not catch.
 verb (v. i.) To spread by, or as by, infecting; to communicate.

chichling vetchnoun (n.) A leguminous plant (Lathyrus sativus), with broad flattened seeds which are sometimes used for food.

clutchnoun (n.) A gripe or clinching with, or as with, the fingers or claws; seizure; grasp.
 noun (n.) The hands, claws, or talons, in the act of grasping firmly; -- often figuratively, for power, rapacity, or cruelty; as, to fall into the clutches of an adversary.
 noun (n.) A device which is used for coupling shafting, etc., so as to transmit motion, and which may be disengaged at pleasure.
 noun (n.) Any device for gripping an object, as at the end of a chain or tackle.
 noun (n.) The nest complement of eggs of a bird.
 noun (n.) To seize, clasp, or gripe with the hand, hands, or claws; -- often figuratively; as, to clutch power.
 noun (n.) To close tightly; to clinch.
 verb (v. i.) To reach (at something) as if to grasp; to catch or snatch; -- often followed by at.

cockmatchnoun (n.) A cockfight.

cratchnoun (n.) A manger or open frame for hay; a crib; a rack.

crosspatchnoun (n.) An ill-natured person.

crotchnoun (n.) The angle formed by the parting of two legs or branches; a fork; the point where a trunk divides; as, the crotch of a tree.
 noun (n.) A stanchion or post of wood or iron, with two arms for supporting a boom, spare yards, etc.; -- called also crane and crutch.
 noun (n.) In the three-ball carom game, a small space at each corner of the table. See Crotched, below.
 verb (v. t.) To provide with a crotch; to give the form of a crotch to; as, to crotch the ends of ropes in splicing or tying knots.
 verb (v. t.) To notch (a log) on opposite sides to provide a grip for the dogs in hauling.

crutchnoun (n.) A staff with a crosspiece at the head, to be placed under the arm or shoulder, to support the lame or infirm in walking.
 noun (n.) A form of pommel for a woman's saddle, consisting of a forked rest to hold the leg of the rider.
 noun (n.) A knee, or piece of knee timber
 noun (n.) A forked stanchion or post; a crotch. See Crotch.
 verb (v. t.) To support on crutches; to prop up.

cultchnoun (n.) Empty oyster shells and other substances laid down on oyster grounds to furnish points for the attachment of the spawn of the oyster.
 noun (n.) Young or seed oysters together with the shells and other objects to which they are usually attached.
 noun (n.) Rubbish; debris; refuse.

cutchnoun (n.) See Catechu.
 noun (n.) See Cultch.

clatchnoun (n.) A soft or sloppy lump or mass; as, to throw a clatch of mud.
 noun (n.) Anything put together or made in a careless or slipshod way; hence, a sluttish or slipshod woman.
 verb (v. t. & i.) To daub or smear, as with lime; to make or finish in a slipshod way.

deadlatchnoun (n.) A kind of latch whose bolt may be so locked by a detent that it can not be opened from the inside by the handle, or from the outside by the latch key.

deathwatchnoun (n.) A small beetle (Anobium tessellatum and other allied species). By forcibly striking its head against woodwork it makes a ticking sound, which is a call of the sexes to each other, but has been imagined by superstitious people to presage death.
 noun (n.) A small wingless insect, of the family Psocidae, which makes a similar but fainter sound; -- called also deathtick.
 noun (n.) The guard set over a criminal before his execution.

despatchnoun (n. & v.) Same as Dispatch.

dogwatchnoun (n.) A half watch; a watch of two hours, of which there are two, the first dogwatch from 4 to 6 o'clock, p. m., and the second dogwatch from 6 to 8 o'clock, p. m.

drawlatchnoun (n.) A housebreaker or thief.

dutchnoun (n.) The people of Holland; Dutchmen.
 noun (n.) The language spoken in Holland.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to Holland, or to its inhabitants.

etchnoun (n.) A variant of Eddish.
 verb (v. t.) To produce, as figures or designs, on mental, glass, or the like, by means of lines or strokes eaten in or corroded by means of some strong acid.
 verb (v. t.) To subject to etching; to draw upon and bite with acid, as a plate of metal.
 verb (v. t.) To sketch; to delineate.
 verb (v. i.) To practice etching; to make etchings.

farfetchnoun (n.) Anything brought from far, or brought about with studious care; a deep strategem.
 verb (v. t.) To bring from far; to seek out studiously.

fetchnoun (n.) A stratagem by which a thing is indirectly brought to pass, or by which one thing seems intended and another is done; a trick; an artifice.
 noun (n.) The apparation of a living person; a wraith.
 verb (v. t.) To bear toward the person speaking, or the person or thing from whose point of view the action is contemplated; to go and bring; to get.
 verb (v. t.) To obtain as price or equivalent; to sell for.
 verb (v. t.) To recall from a swoon; to revive; -- sometimes with to; as, to fetch a man to.
 verb (v. t.) To reduce; to throw.
 verb (v. t.) To bring to accomplishment; to achieve; to make; to perform, with certain objects; as, to fetch a compass; to fetch a leap; to fetch a sigh.
 verb (v. t.) To bring or get within reach by going; to reach; to arrive at; to attain; to reach by sailing.
 verb (v. t.) To cause to come; to bring to a particular state.
 verb (v. i.) To bring one's self; to make headway; to veer; as, to fetch about; to fetch to windward.

gatchnoun (n.) Plaster as used in Persian architecture and decorative art.

hatchnoun (n.) The act of hatching.
 noun (n.) Development; disclosure; discovery.
 noun (n.) The chickens produced at once or by one incubation; a brood.
 noun (n.) A door with an opening over it; a half door, sometimes set with spikes on the upper edge.
 noun (n.) A frame or weir in a river, for catching fish.
 noun (n.) A flood gate; a a sluice gate.
 noun (n.) A bedstead.
 noun (n.) An opening in the deck of a vessel or floor of a warehouse which serves as a passageway or hoistway; a hatchway; also; a cover or door, or one of the covers used in closing such an opening.
 noun (n.) An opening into, or in search of, a mine.
 verb (v. t.) To cross with lines in a peculiar manner in drawing and engraving. See Hatching.
 verb (v. t.) To cross; to spot; to stain; to steep.
 verb (v. t.) To produce, as young, from an egg or eggs by incubation, or by artificial heat; to produce young from (eggs); as, the young when hatched.
 verb (v. t.) To contrive or plot; to form by meditation, and bring into being; to originate and produce; to concoct; as, to hatch mischief; to hatch heresy.
 verb (v. i.) To produce young; -- said of eggs; to come forth from the egg; -- said of the young of birds, fishes, insects, etc.
 verb (v. t.) To close with a hatch or hatches.

hopscotchnoun (n.) A child's game, in which a player, hopping on one foot, drives a stone from one compartment to another of a figure traced or scotched on the ground; -- called also hoppers.

hotchpotchnoun (n.) A mingled mass; a confused mixture; a stew of various ingredients; a hodgepodge.
 noun (n.) A blending of property for equality of division, as when lands given in frank-marriage to one daughter were, after the death of the ancestor, blended with the lands descending to her and to her sisters from the same ancestor, and then divided in equal portions among all the daughters. In modern usage, a mixing together, or throwing into a common mass or stock, of the estate left by a person deceased and the amounts advanced to any particular child or children, for the purpose of a more equal division, or of equalizing the shares of all the children; the property advanced being accounted for at its value when given.

hutchnoun (n.) A chest, box, coffer, bin, coop, or the like, in which things may be stored, or animals kept; as, a grain hutch; a rabbit hutch.
 noun (n.) A measure of two Winchester bushels.
 noun (n.) The case of a flour bolt.
 noun (n.) A car on low wheels, in which coal is drawn in the mine and hoisted out of the pit.
 noun (n.) A jig for washing ore.
 verb (v. t. & i.) To place in huts; to live in huts; as, to hut troops in winter quarters.
 verb (v. t.) To hoard or lay up, in a chest.
 verb (v. t.) To wash (ore) in a box or jig.

ketchnoun (n.) An almost obsolete form of vessel, with a mainmast and a mizzenmast, -- usually from one hundred to two hundred and fifty tons burden.
 noun (n.) A hangman. See Jack Ketch.
 verb (v. t.) To catch.

kutchnoun (n.) The packet of vellum leaves in which the gold is first beaten into thin sheets.
 noun (n.) See Catechu.

latchnoun (n.) That which fastens or holds; a lace; a snare.
 noun (n.) A movable piece which holds anything in place by entering a notch or cavity; specifically, the catch which holds a door or gate when closed, though it be not bolted.
 noun (n.) A latching.
 noun (n.) A crossbow.
 noun (n.) To catch so as to hold.
 noun (n.) To catch or fasten by means of a latch.
 verb (v. t.) To smear; to anoint.

letchnoun (v. & n.) See Leach.
 noun (n.) Strong desire; passion. (Archaic).

matchnoun (n.) Anything used for catching and retaining or communicating fire, made of some substance which takes fire readily, or remains burning some time; esp., a small strip or splint of wood dipped at one end in a substance which can be easily ignited by friction, as a preparation of phosphorus or chlorate of potassium.
 verb (v.) A person or thing equal or similar to another; one able to mate or cope with another; an equal; a mate.
 verb (v.) A bringing together of two parties suited to one another, as for a union, a trial of skill or force, a contest, or the like
 verb (v.) A contest to try strength or skill, or to determine superiority; an emulous struggle.
 verb (v.) A matrimonial union; a marriage.
 verb (v.) An agreement, compact, etc.
 verb (v.) A candidate for matrimony; one to be gained in marriage.
 verb (v.) Equality of conditions in contest or competition.
 verb (v.) Suitable combination or bringing together; that which corresponds or harmonizes with something else; as, the carpet and curtains are a match.
 verb (v.) A perforated board, block of plaster, hardened sand, etc., in which a pattern is partly imbedded when a mold is made, for giving shape to the surfaces of separation between the parts of the mold.
 verb (v. t.) To be a mate or match for; to be able to complete with; to rival successfully; to equal.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with its match; to bring a match, or equal, against; to show an equal competitor to; to set something in competition with, or in opposition to, as equal.
 verb (v. t.) To oppose as equal; to contend successfully against.
 verb (v. t.) To make or procure the equal of, or that which is exactly similar to, or corresponds with; as, to match a vase or a horse; to match cloth.
 verb (v. t.) To make equal, proportionate, or suitable; to adapt, fit, or suit (one thing to another).
 verb (v. t.) To marry; to give in marriage.
 verb (v. t.) To fit together, or make suitable for fitting together; specifically, to furnish with a tongue and a groove, at the edges; as, to match boards.
 verb (v. i.) To be united in marriage; to mate.
 verb (v. i.) To be of equal, or similar, size, figure, color, or quality; to tally; to suit; to correspond; as, these vases match.
  () Alt. of race

mutchnoun (n.) The close linen or muslin cap of an old woman.

natchnoun (n.) The rump of beef; esp., the lower and back part of the rump.

nautchnoun (n.) An entertainment consisting chiefly of dancing by professional dancing (or Nautch) girls.

notchnoun (n.) A hollow cut in anything; a nick; an indentation.
 noun (n.) A narrow passage between two elevation; a deep, close pass; a defile; as, the notch of a mountain.
 verb (v. t.) To cut or make notches in ; to indent; also, to score by notches; as, to notch a stick.
 verb (v. t.) To fit the notch of (an arrow) to the string.

nuthatchnoun (n.) Any one of several species of birds of the genus Sitta, as the European species (Sitta Europaea). The white-breasted nuthatch (S. Carolinensis), the red-breasted nuthatch (S. Canadensis), the pygmy nuthatch (S. pygmaea), and others, are American.

overmatchnoun (n.) One superior in power; also, an unequal match; a contest in which one of the opponents is overmatched.
 verb (v. t.) To be more than equal to or a match for; hence, to vanquish.
 verb (v. t.) To marry (one) to a superior.

quatchadjective (a.) Squat; flat.
 adjective (a.) Squat; flat.

quickhatchnoun (n.) The wolverine.
 noun (n.) The wolverine.

patchnoun (n.) A piece of cloth, or other suitable material, sewed or otherwise fixed upon a garment to repair or strengthen it, esp. upon an old garment to cover a hole.
 noun (n.) A small piece of anything used to repair a breach; as, a patch on a kettle, a roof, etc.
 noun (n.) A small piece of black silk stuck on the face, or neck, to hide a defect, or to heighten beauty.
 noun (n.) A piece of greased cloth or leather used as wrapping for a rifle ball, to make it fit the bore.
 noun (n.) Fig.: Anything regarded as a patch; a small piece of ground; a tract; a plot; as, scattered patches of trees or growing corn.
 noun (n.) A block on the muzzle of a gun, to do away with the effect of dispart, in sighting.
 noun (n.) A paltry fellow; a rogue; a ninny; a fool.
 verb (v. t.) To mend by sewing on a piece or pieces of cloth, leather, or the like; as, to patch a coat.
 verb (v. t.) To mend with pieces; to repair with pieces festened on; to repair clumsily; as, to patch the roof of a house.
 verb (v. t.) To adorn, as the face, with a patch or patches.
 verb (v. t.) To make of pieces or patches; to repair as with patches; to arrange in a hasty or clumsy manner; -- generally with up; as, to patch up a truce.

pinpatchnoun (n.) The common English periwinkle.

potlatchnoun (n.) Among the Kwakiutl, Chimmesyan, and other Indians of the northwestern coast of North America, a ceremonial distribution by a man of gifts to his own and neighboring tribesmen, often, formerly, to his own impoverishment. Feasting, dancing, and public ceremonies accompany it.
 noun (n.) Hence, a feast given to a large number of persons, often accompanied by gifts.

ratchnoun (n.) Same as Rotche.
 noun (n.) A ratchet wheel, or notched bar, with which a pawl or click works.

scatchnoun (n.) A kind of bit for the bridle of a horse; -- called also scatchmouth.

scotchnoun (n.) The dialect or dialects of English spoken by the people of Scotland.
 noun (n.) Collectively, the people of Scotland.
 noun (n.) A chock, wedge, prop, or other support, to prevent slipping; as, a scotch for a wheel or a log on inclined ground.
 noun (n.) A slight cut or incision; a score.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to Scotland, its language, or its inhabitants; Scottish.
 verb (v. t.) To shoulder up; to prop or block with a wedge, chock, etc., as a wheel, to prevent its rolling or slipping.
 verb (v. t.) To cut superficially; to wound; to score.

scratchnoun (n.) A break in the surface of a thing made by scratching, or by rubbing with anything pointed or rough; a slight wound, mark, furrow, or incision.
 noun (n.) A line across the prize ring; up to which boxers are brought when they join fight; hence, test, trial, or proof of courage; as, to bring to the scratch; to come up to the scratch.
 noun (n.) Minute, but tender and troublesome, excoriations, covered with scabs, upon the heels of horses which have been used where it is very wet or muddy.
 noun (n.) A kind of wig covering only a portion of the head.
 noun (n.) A shot which scores by chance and not as intended by the player; a fluke.
 noun (n.) In various sports, the line from which the start is made, except in the case of contestants receiving a distance handicap.
 adjective (a.) Made, done, or happening by chance; arranged with little or no preparation; determined by circumstances; haphazard; as, a scratch team; a scratch crew for a boat race; a scratch shot in billiards.
 verb (v. t.) To rub and tear or mark the surface of with something sharp or ragged; to scrape, roughen, or wound slightly by drawing something pointed or rough across, as the claws, the nails, a pin, or the like.
 verb (v. t.) To write or draw hastily or awkwardly.
 verb (v. t.) To cancel by drawing one or more lines through, as the name of a candidate upon a ballot, or of a horse in a list; hence, to erase; to efface; -- often with out.
 verb (v. t.) To dig or excavate with the claws; as, some animals scratch holes, in which they burrow.
 verb (v. i.) To use the claws or nails in tearing or in digging; to make scratches.
 verb (v. i.) To score, not by skillful play but by some fortunate chance of the game.

scutchnoun (n.) A wooden instrument used in scutching flax and hemp.
 noun (n.) The woody fiber of flax; the refuse of scutched flax.
 verb (v. t.) To beat or whip; to drub.
 verb (v. t.) To separate the woody fiber from (flax, hemp, etc.) by beating; to swingle.
 verb (v. t.) To loosen and dress the fiber of (cotton or silk) by beating; to free (fibrous substances) from dust by beating and blowing.

sketchnoun (n.) An outline or general delineation of anything; a first rough or incomplete draught or plan of any design; especially, in the fine arts, such a representation of an object or scene as serves the artist's purpose by recording its chief features; also, a preliminary study for an original work.
 noun (n.) To draw the outline or chief features of; to make a rought of.
 noun (n.) To plan or describe by giving the principal points or ideas of.
 verb (v. i.) To make sketches, as of landscapes.

slatchnoun (n.) The period of a transitory breeze.
 noun (n.) An interval of fair weather.
 noun (n.) The loose or slack part of a rope; slack.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH M›TCH (According to first letters):


Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (mitc) - Words That Begins with mitc:



Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (mit) - Words That Begins with mit:


mitenoun (n.) A minute arachnid, of the order Acarina, of which there are many species; as, the cheese mite, sugar mite, harvest mite, etc. See Acarina.
 noun (n.) A small coin formerly circulated in England, rated at about a third of a farthing. The name is also applied to a small coin used in Palestine in the time of Christ.
 noun (n.) A small weight; one twentieth of a grain.
 noun (n.) Anything very small; a minute object; a very little quantity or particle.

miternoun (n.) Alt. of Mitre
 verb (v. t.) Alt. of Mitre
 verb (v. i.) Alt. of Mitre

mitrenoun (n.) A covering for the head, worn on solemn occasions by church dignitaries. It has been made in many forms, the present form being a lofty cap with two points or peaks.
 noun (n.) The surface forming the beveled end or edge of a piece where a miter joint is made; also, a joint formed or a junction effected by two beveled ends or edges; a miter joint.
 noun (n.) A sort of base money or coin.
 noun (n. & v.) See Miter.
 verb (v. t.) To place a miter upon; to adorn with a miter.
 verb (v. t.) To match together, as two pieces of molding or brass rule on a line bisecting the angle of junction; to bevel the ends or edges of, for the purpose of matching together at an angle.
 verb (v. i.) To meet and match together, as two pieces of molding, on a line bisecting the angle of junction.

miteringnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Mitre

miterwortnoun (n.) Any plant of the genus Mitella, -- slender, perennial herbs with a pod slightly resembling a bishop's miter; bishop's cap.

mithicadjective (a.) See Mythic.

mithrasnoun (n.) The sun god of the Persians.

mithridatenoun (n.) An antidote against poison, or a composition in form of an electuary, supposed to serve either as a remedy or a preservative against poison; an alexipharmic; -- so called from King Mithridates, its reputed inventor.

mithridaticadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to King Mithridates, or to a mithridate.

mitigableadjective (a.) Admitting of mitigation; that may be mitigated.

mitigantadjective (a.) Tending to mitigate; mitigating; lentitive.

mitigatingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Mitigate

mitigationnoun (n.) The act of mitigating, or the state of being mitigated; abatement or diminution of anything painful, harsh, severe, afflictive, or calamitous; as, the mitigation of pain, grief, rigor, severity, punishment, or penalty.

mitigativeadjective (a.) Tending to mitigate; alleviating.

mitigatornoun (n.) One who, or that which, mitigates.

mitigatoryadjective (a.) Tending to mitigate or alleviate; mitigative.

mitingnoun (n.) A little one; -- used as a term of endearment.

mitomenoun (n.) The denser part of the protoplasm of a cell.

mitosisnoun (n.) See Karyokinesis.

mitraillenoun (n.) Shot or bits of iron used sometimes in loading cannon.

mitrailleurnoun (n.) One who serves a mitrailleuse.
 noun (n.) A mitralleuse.

mitrailleusenoun (n.) A breech-loading machine gun consisting of a number of barrels fitted together, so arranged that the barrels can be fired simultaneously, or successively, and rapidly.

mitraladjective (a.) Pertaining to a miter; resembling a miter; as, the mitral valve between the left auricle and left ventricle of the heart.

mitriformadjective (a.) Having the form of a miter, or a peaked cap; as, a mitriform calyptra.

mittnoun (n.) A mitten; also, a covering for the wrist and hand and not for the fingers.

mittennoun (n.) A covering for the hand, worn to defend it from cold or injury. It differs from a glove in not having a separate sheath for each finger.
 noun (n.) A cover for the wrist and forearm.

mittenedadjective (a.) Covered with a mitten or mittens.

mittentadjective (a.) Sending forth; emitting.

mittimusnoun (n.) A precept or warrant granted by a justice for committing to prison a party charged with crime; a warrant of commitment to prison.
 noun (n.) A writ for removing records from one court to another.

mittynoun (n.) The stormy petrel.

mitunoun (n.) A South American curassow of the genus Mitua.

mityadjective (a.) Having, or abounding with, mites.

mitoticadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to mitosis; karyokinetic; as, mitotic cell division; -- opposed to amitotic.

ENGLISH WORDS BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH M›TCH:

English Words which starts with 'mi' and ends with 'ch':

milchadjective (a.) Giving milk; -- now applied only to beasts.
 adjective (a.) Tender; pitiful; weeping.

misspeechnoun (n.) Wrong speech.