Name Report For First Name STODDARD:


First name STODDARD's origin is English. STODDARD means "keeper of horses". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with STODDARD below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of stoddard.(Brown names are of the same origin (English) with STODDARD and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with STODDARD - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming STODDARD



NAMES RHYMING WITH STODDARD (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 7 Letters (toddard) - Names That Ends with toddard:

Rhyming Names According to Last 6 Letters (oddard) - Names That Ends with oddard:


Rhyming Names According to Last 5 Letters (ddard) - Names That Ends with ddard:

Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (dard) - Names That Ends with dard:

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (ard) - Names That Ends with ard:

ballard cyneheard bard gotthard ceneward willard bayard cinnard kinnard reynard rikard hildegard irmgard irmigard stockhard stokkard adalhard adelhard aegelweard aethelhard aethelweard alhhard athelward bamard bayhard beamard bearnard berinhard bernard bernhard branhard burghard ceard cenehard cynhard deerward deorward eadgard eadward eadweard ealhhard eallard edgard eduard edvard edward eferhard eideard einhard ekhard erhard everard everhard evrard eward garrard gaspard gehard gerhard gifuhard hagaward heahweard hobard hobbard hoireabard hubbard hulbard maynard meinyard millard rainhard reginhard reinhard ricard rickard ricweard rikkard rikward riobard riocard risteard roibeard ruhdugeard ryszard saeweard seaward steward ward weard willhard wudoweard wynward meinhard gerard eginhard eberhard adalard woodward winward

NAMES RHYMING WITH STODDARD (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 7 Letters (stoddar) - Names That Begins with stoddar:

Rhyming Names According to First 6 Letters (stodda) - Names That Begins with stodda:

Rhyming Names According to First 5 Letters (stodd) - Names That Begins with stodd:


Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (stod) - Names That Begins with stod:


Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (sto) - Names That Begins with sto:

stoc stock stockard stockhart stockley stockwell stocleah stocwiella stoffel stok stoke stoner stoney storm storme stormie stormy stosh stowe

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (st) - Names That Begins with st:

stacey stacie stacy stacyann staerling stafford stamfo stamford stamitos stan stanb stanbeny stanburh stanbury stanciyf stancliff stanclyf standa standish stanedisc stanfeld stanfield stanford stanhop stanhope stanislav stanley stanly stanton stantu stantun stanway stanweg stanwi stanwic stanwick stanwik stanwode stanwood stanwyk star starbuck starla starlene starling starls starr stasia staunton stayton steadman stearc stearn steathford stedeman stedman steele stefan stefana stefania stefanie stefano stefford stefn stefon stein steiner steise stela stem step stepan stephan stephana stephania stephanie stephen stephenie stephenson


First Names which starts with 'sto' and ends with 'ard':

First Names which starts with 'st' and ends with 'rd':


First Names which starts with 's' and ends with 'd':

sa'eed sa'id saad saewald safford sajid salford salhford sanford saraid saud saund sayad sayyid scaffeld scand scead sceotend seafraid seonaid serhild sewald seward shad shadd shahrazad sheffield shepard shephard shepherd sherard sherwood sid siegfried sigfreid sigfrid sigifrid sigiwald sigmund sigrid sigwald sinead slaed smid soledad somerled souad sped speed strod stroud su'ad su'ud suffield suoud sutherland suthfeld svend syd

English Words Rhyming STODDARD


ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH STODDARD (According to last letters):

Rhyming Words According to Last 7 Letters (toddard) - English Words That Ends with toddard:

Rhyming Words According to Last 6 Letters (oddard) - English Words That Ends with oddard:

Rhyming Words According to Last 5 Letters (ddard) - English Words That Ends with ddard:

Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (dard) - English Words That Ends with dard:

standardnoun (n.) A flag; colors; a banner; especially, a national or other ensign.
 noun (n.) That which is established by authority as a rule for the measure of quantity, extent, value, or quality; esp., the original specimen weight or measure sanctioned by government, as the standard pound, gallon, or yard.
 noun (n.) That which is established as a rule or model by authority, custom, or general consent; criterion; test.
 noun (n.) The proportion of weights of fine metal and alloy established by authority.
 noun (n.) A tree of natural size supported by its own stem, and not dwarfed by grafting on the stock of a smaller species nor trained upon a wall or trellis.
 noun (n.) The upper petal or banner of a papilionaceous corolla.
 noun (n.) An upright support, as one of the poles of a scaffold; any upright in framing.
 noun (n.) An inverted knee timber placed upon the deck instead of beneath it, with its vertical branch turned upward from that which lies horizontally.
 noun (n.) The sheth of a plow.
 noun (n.) A large drinking cup.
 adjective (a.) Being, affording, or according with, a standard for comparison and judgment; as, standard time; standard weights and measures; a standard authority as to nautical terms; standard gold or silver.
 adjective (a.) Hence: Having a recognized and permanent value; as, standard works in history; standard authors.
 adjective (a.) Not supported by, or fastened to, a wall; as, standard fruit trees.
 adjective (a.) Not of the dwarf kind; as, a standard pear tree.

Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (ard) - English Words That Ends with ard:

adwardnoun (n.) Award.

afeardadjective (p. a.) Afraid.

afterguardnoun (n.) The seaman or seamen stationed on the poop or after part of the ship, to attend the after-sails.

aukwardadjective (a.) See Awkward.

awkwardadjective (a.) Wanting dexterity in the use of the hands, or of instruments; not dexterous; without skill; clumsy; wanting ease, grace, or effectiveness in movement; ungraceful; as, he was awkward at a trick; an awkward boy.
 adjective (a.) Not easily managed or effected; embarrassing.
 adjective (a.) Perverse; adverse; untoward.

babillardnoun (n.) The lesser whitethroat of Europe; -- called also babbling warbler.

backboardnoun (n.) A board which supports the back wen one is sitting;
 noun (n.) A board serving as the back part of anything, as of a wagon.
 noun (n.) A thin stuff used for the backs of framed pictures, mirrors, etc.
 noun (n.) A board attached to the rim of a water wheel to prevent the water from running off the floats or paddies into the interior of the wheel.
 noun (n.) A board worn across the back to give erectness to the figure.

backwardnoun (n.) The state behind or past.
 adjective (a.) Directed to the back or rear; as, backward glances.
 adjective (a.) Unwilling; averse; reluctant; hesitating; loath.
 adjective (a.) Not well advanced in learning; not quick of apprehension; dull; inapt; as, a backward child.
 adjective (a.) Late or behindhand; as, a backward season.
 adjective (a.) Not advanced in civilization; undeveloped; as, the country or region is in a backward state.
 adjective (a.) Already past or gone; bygone.
 adverb (adv.) Alt. of Backwards
 verb (v. i.) To keep back; to hinder.

bardnoun (n.) A professional poet and singer, as among the ancient Celts, whose occupation was to compose and sing verses in honor of the heroic achievements of princes and brave men.
 noun (n.) Hence: A poet; as, the bard of Avon.
 noun (n.) Alt. of Barde
 noun (n.) The exterior covering of the trunk and branches of a tree; the rind.
 noun (n.) Specifically, Peruvian bark.
 verb (v. t.) To cover (meat or game) with a thin slice of fat bacon.

bargeboardnoun (n.) A vergeboard.

barnyardnoun (n.) A yard belonging to a barn.

baseboardnoun (n.) A board, or other woodwork, carried round the walls of a room and touching the floor, to form a base and protect the plastering; -- also called washboard (in England), mopboard, and scrubboard.

baselardnoun (n.) A short sword or dagger, worn in the fifteenth century.

bastardnoun (n.) A "natural" child; a child begotten and born out of wedlock; an illegitimate child; one born of an illicit union.
 noun (n.) An inferior quality of soft brown sugar, obtained from the sirups that / already had several boilings.
 noun (n.) A large size of mold, in which sugar is drained.
 noun (n.) A sweet Spanish wine like muscadel in flavor.
 noun (n.) A writing paper of a particular size. See Paper.
 noun (n.) Lacking in genuineness; spurious; false; adulterate; -- applied to things which resemble those which are genuine, but are really not so.
 noun (n.) Of an unusual make or proportion; as, a bastard musket; a bastard culverin.
 noun (n.) Abbreviated, as the half title in a page preceding the full title page of a book.
 adjective (a.) Begotten and born out of lawful matrimony; illegitimate. See Bastard, n., note.
 verb (v. t.) To bastardize.

bayardadjective (a.) Properly, a bay horse, but often any horse. Commonly in the phrase blind bayard, an old blind horse.
 adjective (a.) A stupid, clownish fellow.

beardnoun (n.) The hair that grows on the chin, lips, and adjacent parts of the human face, chiefly of male adults.
 noun (n.) The long hairs about the face in animals, as in the goat.
 noun (n.) The cluster of small feathers at the base of the beak in some birds
 noun (n.) The appendages to the jaw in some Cetacea, and to the mouth or jaws of some fishes.
 noun (n.) The byssus of certain shellfish, as the muscle.
 noun (n.) The gills of some bivalves, as the oyster.
 noun (n.) In insects, the hairs of the labial palpi of moths and butterflies.
 noun (n.) Long or stiff hairs on a plant; the awn; as, the beard of grain.
 noun (n.) A barb or sharp point of an arrow or other instrument, projecting backward to prevent the head from being easily drawn out.
 noun (n.) That part of the under side of a horse's lower jaw which is above the chin, and bears the curb of a bridle.
 noun (n.) That part of a type which is between the shoulder of the shank and the face.
 noun (n.) An imposition; a trick.
 verb (v. t.) To take by the beard; to seize, pluck, or pull the beard of (a man), in anger or contempt.
 verb (v. t.) To oppose to the gills; to set at defiance.
 verb (v. t.) To deprive of the gills; -- used only of oysters and similar shellfish.

bearwardnoun (n.) A keeper of bears. See Bearherd.

becardnoun (n.) A South American bird of the flycatcher family. (Tityra inquisetor).

beghardnoun (n.) Alt. of Beguard

beguardnoun (n.) One of an association of religious laymen living in imitation of the Beguines. They arose in the thirteenth century, were afterward subjected to much persecution, and were suppressed by Innocent X. in 1650. Called also Beguins.

belgardnoun (n.) A sweet or loving look.

billardnoun (n.) An English fish, allied to the cod; the coalfish.

billboardnoun (n.) A piece of thick plank, armed with iron plates, and fixed on the bow or fore channels of a vessel, for the bill or fluke of the anchor to rest on.
 noun (n.) A flat surface, as of a panel or of a fence, on which bills are posted; a bulletin board.

billiardadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the game of billiards.

blackboardnoun (n.) A broad board painted black, or any black surface on which writing, drawing, or the working of mathematical problems can be done with chalk or crayons. It is much used in schools.

blackguardnoun (n.) The scullions and lower menials of a court, or of a nobleman's household, who, in a removal from one residence to another, had charge of the kitchen utensils, and being smutted by them, were jocularly called the "black guard"; also, the servants and hangers-on of an army.
 noun (n.) The criminals and vagrants or vagabonds of a town or community, collectively.
 noun (n.) A person of stained or low character, esp. one who uses scurrilous language, or treats others with foul abuse; a scoundrel; a rough.
 noun (n.) A vagrant; a bootblack; a gamin.
 adjective (a.) Scurrilous; abusive; low; worthless; vicious; as, blackguard language.
 verb (v. t.) To revile or abuse in scurrilous language.

blancardnoun (n.) A kind of linen cloth made in Normandy, the thread of which is partly blanches before it is woven.

blinkardnoun (n.) One who blinks with, or as with, weak eyes.
 noun (n.) That which twinkles or glances, as a dim star, which appears and disappears.

blizzardnoun (n.) A gale of piercingly cold wind, usually accompanied with fine and blinding snow; a furious blast.

bluebeardnoun (n.) The hero of a mediaeval French nursery legend, who, leaving home, enjoined his young wife not to open a certain room in his castle. She entered it, and found the murdered bodies of his former wives. -- Also used adjectively of a subject which it is forbidden to investigate.

boardnoun (n.) A piece of timber sawed thin, and of considerable length and breadth as compared with the thickness, -- used for building, etc.
 noun (n.) A table to put food upon.
 noun (n.) Hence: What is served on a table as food; stated meals; provision; entertainment; -- usually as furnished for pay; as, to work for one's board; the price of board.
 noun (n.) A table at which a council or court is held. Hence: A council, convened for business, or any authorized assembly or meeting, public or private; a number of persons appointed or elected to sit in council for the management or direction of some public or private business or trust; as, the Board of Admiralty; a board of trade; a board of directors, trustees, commissioners, etc.
 noun (n.) A square or oblong piece of thin wood or other material used for some special purpose, as, a molding board; a board or surface painted or arranged for a game; as, a chessboard; a backgammon board.
 noun (n.) Paper made thick and stiff like a board, for book covers, etc.; pasteboard; as, to bind a book in boards.
 noun (n.) The stage in a theater; as, to go upon the boards, to enter upon the theatrical profession.
 noun (n.) The border or side of anything.
 noun (n.) The side of a ship.
 noun (n.) The stretch which a ship makes in one tack.
 noun (n.) To go on board of, or enter, as a ship, whether in a hostile or a friendly way.
 noun (n.) To enter, as a railway car.
 noun (n.) To furnish with regular meals, or with meals and lodgings, for compensation; to supply with daily meals.
 noun (n.) To place at board, for compensation; as, to board one's horse at a livery stable.
 verb (v. t.) To cover with boards or boarding; as, to board a house.
 verb (v. i.) To obtain meals, or meals and lodgings, statedly for compensation; as, he boards at the hotel.
 verb (v. t.) To approach; to accost; to address; hence, to woo.

bodyguardnoun (n.) A guard to protect or defend the person; a lifeguard.
 noun (n.) Retinue; attendance; following.

boggardnoun (n.) A bogey.

bollardnoun (n.) An upright wooden or iron post in a boat or on a dock, used in veering or fastening ropes.

bombardnoun (n.) A piece of heavy ordnance formerly used for throwing stones and other ponderous missiles. It was the earliest kind of cannon.
 noun (n.) A bombardment.
 noun (n.) A large drinking vessel or can, or a leather bottle, for carrying liquor or beer.
 noun (n.) Padded breeches.
 noun (n.) See Bombardo.
 verb (v. t.) To attack with bombards or with artillery; especially, to throw shells, hot shot, etc., at or into.

boulevardnoun (n.) Originally, a bulwark or rampart of fortification or fortified town.
 noun (n.) A public walk or street occupying the site of demolished fortifications. Hence: A broad avenue in or around a city.

boyardnoun (n.) A member of a Russian aristocratic order abolished by Peter the Great. Also, one of a privileged class in Roumania.

brancardnoun (n.) A litter on which a person may be carried.

brickyardnoun (n.) A place where bricks are made, especially an inclosed place.

bridgeboardnoun (n.) A notched board to which the treads and risers of the steps of wooden stairs are fastened.
 noun (n.) A board or plank used as a bridge.

brocardnoun (n.) An elementary principle or maximum; a short, proverbial rule, in law, ethics, or metaphysics.

buckboardnoun (n.) A four-wheeled vehicle, having a long elastic board or frame resting on the bolsters or axletrees, and a seat or seats placed transversely upon it; -- called also buck wagon.

bustardnoun (n.) A bird of the genus Otis.

buzzardnoun (n.) A bird of prey of the Hawk family, belonging to the genus Buteo and related genera.
 noun (n.) A blockhead; a dunce.
 adjective (a.) Senseless; stupid.

byardnoun (n.) A piece of leather crossing the breast, used by the men who drag sledges in coal mines.

camelopardnoun (n.) An African ruminant; the giraffe. See Giraffe.

camisardnoun (n.) One of the French Protestant insurgents who rebelled against Louis XIV, after the revocation of the edict of Nates; -- so called from the peasant's smock (camise) which they wore.

canardnoun (n.) An extravagant or absurd report or story; a fabricated sensational report or statement; esp. one set afloat in the newspapers to hoax the public.

cardnoun (n.) A piece of pasteboard, or thick paper, blank or prepared for various uses; as, a playing card; a visiting card; a card of invitation; pl. a game played with cards.
 noun (n.) A published note, containing a brief statement, explanation, request, expression of thanks, or the like; as, to put a card in the newspapers. Also, a printed programme, and (fig.), an attraction or inducement; as, this will be a good card for the last day of the fair.
 noun (n.) A paper on which the points of the compass are marked; the dial or face of the mariner's compass.
 noun (n.) A perforated pasteboard or sheet-metal plate for warp threads, making part of the Jacquard apparatus of a loom. See Jacquard.
 noun (n.) An indicator card. See under Indicator.
 noun (n.) An instrument for disentangling and arranging the fibers of cotton, wool, flax, etc.; or for cleaning and smoothing the hair of animals; -- usually consisting of bent wire teeth set closely in rows in a thick piece of leather fastened to a back.
 noun (n.) A roll or sliver of fiber (as of wool) delivered from a carding machine.
 verb (v. i.) To play at cards; to game.
 verb (v. t.) To comb with a card; to cleanse or disentangle by carding; as, to card wool; to card a horse.
 verb (v. t.) To clean or clear, as if by using a card.
 verb (v. t.) To mix or mingle, as with an inferior or weaker article.

cardboardnoun (n.) A stiff compact pasteboard of various qualities, for making cards, etc., often having a polished surface.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH STODDARD (According to first letters):

Rhyming Words According to First 7 Letters (stoddar) - Words That Begins with stoddar:

Rhyming Words According to First 6 Letters (stodda) - Words That Begins with stodda:

Rhyming Words According to First 5 Letters (stodd) - Words That Begins with stodd:

Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (stod) - Words That Begins with stod:

stodgyadjective (a.) Wet.

Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (sto) - Words That Begins with sto:

stoatnoun (n.) The ermine in its summer pelage, when it is reddish brown, but with a black tip to the tail. The name is sometimes applied also to other brown weasels.

stocahnoun (n.) A menial attendant.

stoccadenoun (n. & v.) See Stockade.

stoccadonoun (n.) A stab; a thrust with a rapier.

stochasticadjective (a.) Conjectural; able to conjecture.

stocknoun (n.) The stem, or main body, of a tree or plant; the fixed, strong, firm part; the trunk.
 noun (n.) The stem or branch in which a graft is inserted.
 noun (n.) A block of wood; something fixed and solid; a pillar; a firm support; a post.
 noun (n.) Hence, a person who is as dull and lifeless as a stock or post; one who has little sense.
 noun (n.) The principal supporting part; the part in which others are inserted, or to which they are attached.
 noun (n.) The wood to which the barrel, lock, etc., of a musket or like firearm are secured; also, a long, rectangular piece of wood, which is an important part of several forms of gun carriage.
 noun (n.) The handle or contrivance by which bits are held in boring; a bitstock; a brace.
 noun (n.) The block of wood or metal frame which constitutes the body of a plane, and in which the plane iron is fitted; a plane stock.
 noun (n.) The wooden or iron crosspiece to which the shank of an anchor is attached. See Illust. of Anchor.
 noun (n.) The support of the block in which an anvil is fixed, or of the anvil itself.
 noun (n.) A handle or wrench forming a holder for the dies for cutting screws; a diestock.
 noun (n.) The part of a tally formerly struck in the exchequer, which was delivered to the person who had lent the king money on account, as the evidence of indebtedness. See Counterfoil.
 noun (n.) The original progenitor; also, the race or line of a family; the progenitor of a family and his direct descendants; lineage; family.
 noun (n.) Money or capital which an individual or a firm employs in business; fund; in the United States, the capital of a bank or other company, in the form of transferable shares, each of a certain amount; money funded in government securities, called also the public funds; in the plural, property consisting of shares in joint-stock companies, or in the obligations of a government for its funded debt; -- so in the United States, but in England the latter only are called stocks, and the former shares.
 noun (n.) Same as Stock account, below.
 noun (n.) Supply provided; store; accumulation; especially, a merchant's or manufacturer's store of goods; as, to lay in a stock of provisions.
 noun (n.) Domestic animals or beasts collectively, used or raised on a farm; as, a stock of cattle or of sheep, etc.; -- called also live stock.
 noun (n.) That portion of a pack of cards not distributed to the players at the beginning of certain games, as gleek, etc., but which might be drawn from afterward as occasion required; a bank.
 noun (n.) A thrust with a rapier; a stoccado.
 noun (n.) A covering for the leg, or leg and foot; as, upper stocks (breeches); nether stocks (stockings).
 noun (n.) A kind of stiff, wide band or cravat for the neck; as, a silk stock.
 noun (n.) A frame of timber, with holes in which the feet, or the feet and hands, of criminals were formerly confined by way of punishment.
 noun (n.) The frame or timbers on which a ship rests while building.
 noun (n.) Red and gray bricks, used for the exterior of walls and the front of buildings.
 noun (n.) Any cruciferous plant of the genus Matthiola; as, common stock (Matthiola incana) (see Gilly-flower); ten-weeks stock (M. annua).
 noun (n.) An irregular metalliferous mass filling a large cavity in a rock formation, as a stock of lead ore deposited in limestone.
 noun (n.) A race or variety in a species.
 noun (n.) In tectology, an aggregate or colony of persons (see Person), as trees, chains of salpae, etc.
 noun (n.) The beater of a fulling mill.
 noun (n.) A liquid or jelly containing the juices and soluble parts of meat, and certain vegetables, etc., extracted by cooking; -- used in making soup, gravy, etc.
 noun (n.) Raw material; that out of which something is manufactured; as, paper stock.
 noun (n.) A plain soap which is made into toilet soap by adding perfumery, coloring matter, etc.
 adjective (a.) Used or employed for constant service or application, as if constituting a portion of a stock or supply; standard; permanent; standing; as, a stock actor; a stock play; a stock sermon.
 verb (v. t.) To lay up; to put aside for future use; to store, as merchandise, and the like.
 verb (v. t.) To provide with material requisites; to store; to fill; to supply; as, to stock a warehouse, that is, to fill it with goods; to stock a farm, that is, to supply it with cattle and tools; to stock land, that is, to occupy it with a permanent growth, especially of grass.
 verb (v. t.) To suffer to retain milk for twenty-four hours or more previous to sale, as cows.
 verb (v. t.) To put in the stocks.

stockingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Stock
 noun (n.) A close-fitting covering for the foot and leg, usually knit or woven.
 noun (n.) Any of various things resembling, or likened to, a stocking; as: (a) A broad ring of color, differing from the general color, on the lower part of the leg of a quadruped; esp., a white ring between the coronet and the hock or knee of a dark-colored horse. (b) A knitted hood of cotton thread which is eventually converted by a special process into an incandescent mantle for gas lighting.
 verb (v. t.) To dress in GBs.

stockadingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Stockade

stockbrokernoun (n.) A broker who deals in stocks.

stockdovenoun (n.) A common European wild pigeon (Columba aenas), so called because at one time believed to be the stock of the domestic pigeon, or, according to some, from its breeding in the stocks, or trunks, of trees.

stockernoun (n.) One who makes or fits stocks, as of guns or gun carriages, etc.

stockfishnoun (n.) Salted and dried fish, especially codfish, hake, ling, and torsk; also, codfish dried without being salted.
 noun (n.) Young fresh cod.

stockholdernoun (n.) One who is a holder or proprietor of stock in the public funds, or in the funds of a bank or other stock company.

stockinetnoun (n.) An elastic textile fabric imitating knitting, of which stockings, under-garments, etc., are made.

stockingernoun (n.) A stocking weaver.

stockishadjective (a.) Like a stock; stupid; blockish.

stockjobbernoun (n.) One who speculates in stocks for gain; one whose occupation is to buy and sell stocks. In England a jobber acts as an intermediary between brokers.

stockjobbingnoun (n.) The act or art of dealing in stocks; the business of a stockjobber.

stockmannoun (n.) A herdsman; a ranchman; one owning, or having charge of, herds of live stock.

stockworknoun (n.) A system of working in ore, etc., when it lies not in strata or veins, but in solid masses, so as to be worked in chambers or stories.
 noun (n.) A metalliferous deposit characterized by the impregnation of the mass of rock with many small veins or nests irregularly grouped. This kind of deposit is especially common with tin ore. Such deposits are worked in floors or stories.

stockyadjective (a.) Short and thick; thick rather than tall or corpulent.
 adjective (a.) Headstrong.

stoechiologynoun (n.) Alt. of Stoechiometry

stoechiometrynoun (n.) See Stoichiology, Stoichiometry, etc.

stoicnoun (n.) A disciple of the philosopher Zeno; one of a Greek sect which held that men should be free from passion, unmoved by joy or grief, and should submit without complaint to unavoidable necessity, by which all things are governed.
 noun (n.) Hence, a person not easily excited; an apathetic person; one who is apparently or professedly indifferent to pleasure or pain.
 noun (n.) Alt. of Stoical

stoicalnoun (n.) Of or pertaining to the Stoics; resembling the Stoics or their doctrines.
 noun (n.) Not affected by passion; manifesting indifference to pleasure or pain.

stoichiologicaladjective (a.) Of or pertaining to stoichiology.

stoichiologynoun (n.) That part of the science of physiology which treats of the elements, or principles, composing animal tissues.
 noun (n.) The doctrine of the elementary requisites of mere thought.
 noun (n.) The statement or discussion of the first principles of any science or art.

stoichiometricadjective (a.) Alt. of Stoichiometrical

stoichiometricaladjective (a.) Of or pertaining to stoichiometry; employed in, or obtained by, stoichiometry.

stoichiometrynoun (n.) The art or process of calculating the atomic proportions, combining weights, and other numerical relations of chemical elements and their compounds.

stoicismnoun (n.) The opinions and maxims of the Stoics.
 noun (n.) A real or pretended indifference to pleasure or pain; insensibility; impassiveness.

stoicitynoun (n.) Stoicism.

stokeholenoun (n.) The mouth to the grate of a furnace; also, the space in front of the furnace, where the stokers stand.

stokeyadjective (a.) Close; sultry.

stolanoun (n.) A long garment, descending to the ankles, worn by Roman women.

stolenoun (n.) A stolon.
 noun (n.) A long, loose garment reaching to the feet.
 noun (n.) A narrow band of silk or stuff, sometimes enriched with embroidery and jewels, worn on the left shoulder of deacons, and across both shoulders of bishops and priests, pendent on each side nearly to the ground. At Mass, it is worn crossed on the breast by priests. It is used in various sacred functions.
  (imp.) of Steal
  () imp. of Steal.

stoledadjective (a.) Having or wearing a stole.

stolidadjective (a.) Hopelessly insensible or stupid; not easily aroused or excited; dull; impassive; foolish.

stoliditynoun (n.) The state or quality of being stolid; dullness of intellect; obtuseness; stupidity.

stolidnessnoun (n.) Same as Stolidity.

stolonnoun (n.) A trailing branch which is disposed to take root at the end or at the joints; a stole.
 noun (n.) An extension of the integument of the body, or of the body wall, from which buds are developed, giving rise to new zooids, and thus forming a compound animal in which the zooids usually remain united by the stolons. Such stolons are often present in Anthozoa, Hydroidea, Bryozoa, and social ascidians. See Illust. under Scyphistoma.

stoloniferousadjective (a.) Producing stolons; putting forth suckers.

stomanoun (n.) One of the minute apertures between the cells in many serous membranes.
 noun (n.) The minute breathing pores of leaves or other organs opening into the intercellular spaces, and usually bordered by two contractile cells.
 noun (n.) The line of dehiscence of the sporangium of a fern. It is usually marked by two transversely elongated cells. See Illust. of Sporangium.
 noun (n.) A stigma. See Stigma, n., 6 (a) & (b).

stomachnoun (n.) An enlargement, or series of enlargements, in the anterior part of the alimentary canal, in which food is digested; any cavity in which digestion takes place in an animal; a digestive cavity. See Digestion, and Gastric juice, under Gastric.
 noun (n.) The desire for food caused by hunger; appetite; as, a good stomach for roast beef.
 noun (n.) Hence appetite in general; inclination; desire.
 noun (n.) Violence of temper; anger; sullenness; resentment; willful obstinacy; stubbornness.
 noun (n.) Pride; haughtiness; arrogance.
 verb (v. t.) To resent; to remember with anger; to dislike.
 verb (v. t.) To bear without repugnance; to brook.
 verb (v. i.) To be angry.

stomachingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Stomach
 noun (n.) Resentment.

stomachalnoun (n.) A stomachic.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the stomach; gastric.
 adjective (a.) Helping the stomach; stomachic; cordial.

stomachernoun (n.) One who stomachs.
 noun (n.) An ornamental covering for the breast, worn originally both by men and women. Those worn by women were often richly decorated.

stomachfuladjective (a.) Willfully obstinate; stubborn; perverse.

stomachicnoun (n.) A medicine that strengthens the stomach and excites its action.
 adjective (a.) Alt. of Stomachical

stomachicaladjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the stomach; as, stomachic vessels.
 adjective (a.) Strengthening to the stomach; exciting the action of the stomach; stomachal; cordial.


English Words which starts with 'sto' and ends with 'ard':

stowboardnoun (n.) A place into which rubbish is put.

English Words which starts with 'st' and ends with 'rd':

stackyardnoun (n.) A yard or inclosure for stacks of hay or grain.

staggardnoun (n.) The male red deer when four years old.

starboardadjective (a.) Pertaining to the right-hand side of a ship; being or lying on the right side; as, the starboard quarter; starboard tack.
 verb (v. t.) That side of a vessel which is on the right hand of a person who stands on board facing the bow; -- opposed to larboard, or port.
 verb (v. t.) To put to the right, or starboard, side of a vessel; as, to starboard the helm.

steelyardnoun (n.) A form of balance in which the body to be weighed is suspended from the shorter arm of a lever, which turns on a fulcrum, and a counterpoise is caused to slide upon the longer arm to produce equilibrium, its place upon this arm (which is notched or graduated) indicating the weight; a Roman balance; -- very commonly used also in the plural form, steelyards.

stewardnoun (n.) A man employed in a large family, or on a large estate, to manage the domestic concerns, supervise other servants, collect the rents or income, keep accounts, and the like.
 noun (n.) A person employed in a hotel, or a club, or on board a ship, to provide for the table, superintend the culinary affairs, etc. In naval vessels, the captain's steward, wardroom steward, steerage steward, warrant officers steward, etc., are petty officers who provide for the messes under their charge.
 noun (n.) A fiscal agent of certain bodies; as, a steward in a Methodist church.
 noun (n.) In some colleges, an officer who provides food for the students and superintends the kitchen; also, an officer who attends to the accounts of the students.
 noun (n.) In Scotland, a magistrate appointed by the crown to exercise jurisdiction over royal lands.
 verb (v. t.) To manage as a steward.

stiltbirdnoun (n.) See Stilt, n., 3.

stinkardnoun (n.) A mean, stinking, paltry fellow.
 noun (n.) The teledu of the East Indies. It emits a disagreeable odor.

stonebirdnoun (n.) The yellowlegs; -- called also stone snipe. See Tattler, 2.

straightforwardadjective (a.) Proceeding in a straight course or manner; not deviating; honest; frank.
 adverb (adv.) In a straightforward manner.

strawboardnoun (n.) Pasteboard made of pulp of straw.

streetwardnoun (n.) An officer, or ward, having the care of the streets.
 adjective (a.) Facing toward the street.

stringboardnoun (n.) Same as Stringpiece.