Name Report For First Name DON:

DON

First name DON's origins are Celtic and English. DON means "dark stranger" (Celtic) and "abbreviation of names beginning with don-. in mythology the irish donn was known as king of the underworld" in English. You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with DON below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of don.(Brown names are of the same origin (Celtic,English) with DON and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with DON - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming DON

FIRST NAMES WHICH INCLUDES DON AS A WHOLE:

donella donia donalda aedon dona donata ricadonna sidon donoma hakidonmuya adoncia doncia dong celidone dudon celyddon donkor glendon adonis corydon korudon ladon laomedon poseidon sarpedon spyridon donatello raidon adonia aldona aldonsa aldonza chardonnay donelle donita donna donnell donnitta sidonia sidonie ardon beldon bredon brendon burhdon caedon condon creedon croydon donaghy donahue donal donald donall donato donavan donavon donegan donel donell donn donnachadh donnally donnan donnchadh donne donnelly donnie donny donogb donovan dontae dontay dontaye donte dontell dontrell donzel eldon feldon gordon gradon haddon hadon haydon jadon jaedon jaidon jaydon jordon lancdon langdon macdonald macdonell mardon nodons ogdon randon shandon weldon waldon seldon lyndon landon huntingdon burdon brandon blagdon vardon donagh donogh donat celidon odon sodonia sheldon elsdon kingdon meldon sandon seadon wildon donatien adon jourdon bardon braddon bradon braedon braydon dondre raydon donnel

NAMES RHYMING WITH DON (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 2 Letters (on) - Names That Ends with on:

afton carnation solon strephon cihuaton nijlon sokanon odion sion accalon hebron pendragon antton erromon gotzon txanton zorion eburacon mabon bendision alston alton benton burton carelton fenton hamilton harrison histion kenton pierson preston ralston rawson remington rexton sexton stanton weston aymon ganelon vernon lon anton acheron acteon aeson agamemnon alcmaeon amphion amphitryon andraemon arion bellerophon biton cadmon cenon cercyon charon chiron creon daemon demogorgon demophon deucalion echion endymion erysichthon euryton geryon haemon hyperion iasion iason ion ixion jason kedalion laocoon lycaon machaon myron ophion palaemon panteleimon phaethon phaon philemon phlegethon pygmalion sinon telamon triton typhon xenophon xylon zenon arnon deron agoston

NAMES RHYMING WITH DON (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (do) - Names That Begins with do:

doane doanna doba dobhailen dobi dodinel dohnatello dohosan dohtor doire doireann dolan doli dolie dolius dollie dolly dolores dolorita dolph dolphus domenica domenick domenico domenique domevlo domhnall domhnull domhnulla dominga domingart domingo dominic dominica dominick dominik dominique dooley doon dor dora doralie doran dorbeta dorcas dorcey dordei dordie dore doreen doreena doren dorene dorette doria dorian dorice dorien dorika dorin dorina dorinda dorine dorion doris dorise dorit dorkas doro doron dorotea doroteia dorotha dorothea dorothee dorothy dorottya dorran dorrance dorrel dorrell dorren dorrin dorsey dortha doru dory dosne dottie doug dougal doughal doughall doughlas douglas douglass doune dour dov dovev

NAMES BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH DON:

First Names which starts with 'd' and ends with 'n':

dacian daegan daelan daelyn daelynn dagan dagen dagian daijon dailyn daimhin daimmen dain dainan dairion dalan dalen dallan dallen dallin dallon dalon dalston dalton dalyn dalynn daman damen dameon damian damiean damien damon dan danathon daniel-sean dann dannon danon danton danylynn daran dareen daren darien darin darleen darolyn daron darrellyn darren darrin darron darryn dartagnan darton darvin darwin darwyn darylyn daryn daveen daveon davian davidson davin davion davison davynn dawn dawson daxton daylan daylen daylin daylon dayson dayton dayveon deacon deagan deaglan deakin dean deann dearborn deasmumhan deavon declan deeann deegan deen dehaan deikun delbin delman delmon delron delsin delton

English Words Rhyming DON

ENGLISH WORDS WHICH INCLUDES DON AS A WHOLE:

abaddonnoun (n.) The destroyer, or angel of the bottomless pit; -- the same as Apollyon and Asmodeus.
 noun (n.) Hell; the bottomless pit.

abandoningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Abandon

abandonnoun (n.) A complete giving up to natural impulses; freedom from artificial constraint; careless freedom or ease.
 verb (v. t.) To cast or drive out; to banish; to expel; to reject.
 verb (v. t.) To give up absolutely; to forsake entirely ; to renounce utterly; to relinquish all connection with or concern on; to desert, as a person to whom one owes allegiance or fidelity; to quit; to surrender.
 verb (v. t.) Reflexively: To give (one's self) up without attempt at self-control; to yield (one's self) unrestrainedly; -- often in a bad sense.
 verb (v. t.) To relinquish all claim to; -- used when an insured person gives up to underwriters all claim to the property covered by a policy, which may remain after loss or damage by a peril insured against.
 verb (v.) Abandonment; relinquishment.

abandonedadjective (a.) Forsaken, deserted.
 adjective (a.) Self-abandoned, or given up to vice; extremely wicked, or sinning without restraint; irreclaimably wicked ; as, an abandoned villain.
  (imp. & p. p.) of Abandon

abandoneenoun (n.) One to whom anything is legally abandoned.

abandonernoun (n.) One who abandons.

abandonmentnoun (n.) The act of abandoning, or the state of being abandoned; total desertion; relinquishment.
 noun (n.) The relinquishment by the insured to the underwriters of what may remain of the property insured after a loss or damage by a peril insured against.
 noun (n.) The relinquishment of a right, claim, or privilege, as to mill site, etc.
 noun (n.) The voluntary leaving of a person to whom one is bound by a special relation, as a wife, husband, or child; desertion.
 noun (n.) Careless freedom or ease; abandon.

achilles' tendonnoun (n.) The strong tendon formed of the united tendons of the large muscles in the calf of the leg, an inserted into the bone of the heel; -- so called from the mythological account of Achilles being held by the heel when dipped in the River Styx.

acotyledonnoun (n.) A plant which has no cotyledons, as the dodder and all flowerless plants.

acotyledonousadjective (a.) Having no seed lobes, as the dodder; also applied to plants which have no true seeds, as ferns, mosses, etc.

acrodontnoun (n.) One of a group of lizards having the teeth immovably united to the top of the alveolar ridge.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the acrodonts.

adelocodonicadjective (a.) Applied to sexual zooids of hydroids, that have a saclike form and do not become free; -- opposed to phanerocodonic.

adoneanadjective (a.) Pertaining to Adonis; Adonic.

adonicnoun (n.) An Adonic verse.
 adjective (a.) Relating to Adonis, famed for his beauty.

adonisnoun (n.) A youth beloved by Venus for his beauty. He was killed in the chase by a wild boar.
 noun (n.) A preeminently beautiful young man; a dandy.
 noun (n.) A genus of plants of the family Ranunculaceae, containing the pheasant's eye (Adonis autumnalis); -- named from Adonis, whose blood was fabled to have stained the flower.

adonistnoun (n.) One who maintains that points of the Hebrew word translated "Jehovah" are really the vowel points of the word "Adonai." See Jehovist.

anodonnoun (n.) A genus of fresh-water bivalves, having no teeth at the hinge.

antiodontalgicnoun (n.) A remedy for toothache.
 adjective (a.) Efficacious in curing toothache.

adonainoun (n.) A Hebrew name for God, usually translated in the Old Testament by the word "Lord".

aerodoneticsnoun (n.) The science of gliding and soaring flight.

bandonnoun (n.) Disposal; control; license.

belladonnanoun (n.) An herbaceous European plant (Atropa belladonna) with reddish bell-shaped flowers and shining black berries. The whole plant and its fruit are very poisonous, and the root and leaves are used as powerful medicinal agents. Its properties are largely due to the alkaloid atropine which it contains. Called also deadly nightshade.
 noun (n.) A species of Amaryllis (A. belladonna); the belladonna lily.

bombardonnoun (n.) Originally, a deep-toned instrument of the oboe or bassoon family; thence, a bass reed stop on the organ. The name bombardon is now given to a brass instrument, the lowest of the saxhorns, in tone resembling the ophicleide.

bourdonnoun (n.) A pilgrim's staff.
 noun (n.) A drone bass, as in a bagpipe, or a hurdy-gurdy. See Burden (of a song.)
 noun (n.) A kind of organ stop.

boustrophedonnoun (n.) An ancient mode of writing, in alternate directions, one line from left to right, and the next from right to left (as fields are plowed), as in early Greek and Hittite.

boustrophedonicadjective (a.) Relating to the boustrophedon made of writing.

bunodontanoun (n. pl.) Alt. of Bunodonts

bunodontsnoun (n. pl.) A division of the herbivorous mammals including the hogs and hippopotami; -- so called because the teeth are tuberculated.

burdonnoun (n.) A pilgrim's staff.

calcedonnoun (n.) A foul vein, like chalcedony, in some precious stones.

calcedonicadjective (a.) Alt. of Calcedonian

calcedonianadjective (a.) See Chalcedonic.

caledonianoun (n.) The ancient Latin name of Scotland; -- still used in poetry.

caledoniannoun (n.) A native or inhabitant of Caledonia or Scotland.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to Caledonia or Scotland; Scottish; Scotch.

caledonitenoun (n.) A hydrous sulphate of copper and lead, found in some parts of Caledonia or Scotland.

cassidonynoun (n.) The French lavender (Lavandula Stoechas)
 noun (n.) The goldilocks (Chrysocoma Linosyris) and perhaps other plants related to the genus Gnaphalium or cudweed.

celadonnoun (n.) A pale sea-green color; also, porcelain or fine pottery of this tint.

chaetodontnoun (n.) A marine fish of the family Chaetodontidae. The chaetodonts have broad, compressed bodies, and usually bright colors.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to the Chaetodonts or the family Chaetodontidae.

chalcedonicadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to chalcedony.

chalcedonynoun (n.) A cryptocrystalline, translucent variety of quartz, having usually a whitish color, and a luster nearly like wax.

chelidonnoun (n.) The hollow at the flexure of the arm.

chelidonicadjective (a.) Of, pertaining to, or derived from, the celandine.

chelidoniusnoun (n.) A small stone taken from the gizzard of a young swallow. -- anciently worn as a medicinal charm.

clarendonnoun (n.) A style of type having a narrow and heave face. It is made in all sizes.

coelodontnoun (n.) One of a group of lizards having hollow teeth.
 adjective (a.) Having hollow teeth; -- said of a group lizards.

condonationnoun (n.) The act of condoning or pardoning.
 noun (n.) Forgiveness, either express or implied, by a husband of his wife or by a wife of her husband, for a breach of marital duty, as adultery, with an implied condition that the offense shall not be repeated.

condoningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Condone

conodontnoun (n.) A peculiar toothlike fossil of many forms, found especially in carboniferous rocks. Such fossils are supposed by some to be the teeth of marsipobranch fishes, but they are probably the jaws of annelids.

cordonnoun (n.) A cord or ribbon bestowed or borne as a badge of honor; a broad ribbon, usually worn after the manner of a baldric, constituting a mark of a very high grade in an honorary order. Cf. Grand cordon.
 noun (n.) The cord worn by a Franciscan friar.
 noun (n.) The coping of the scarp wall, which projects beyong the face of the wall a few inches.
 noun (n.) A line or series of sentinels, or of military posts, inclosing or guarding any place or thing.
 noun (n.) A rich and ornamental lace or string, used to secure a mantle in some costumes of state.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DON (According to last letters):


Rhyming Words According to Last 2 Letters (on) - English Words That Ends with on:


abacinationnoun (n.) The act of abacinating.

abactionnoun (n.) Stealing cattle on a large scale.

abalienationnoun (n.) The act of abalienating; alienation; estrangement.

abannationnoun (n.) Alt. of Abannition

abannitionnoun (n.) Banishment.

abarticulationnoun (n.) Articulation, usually that kind of articulation which admits of free motion in the joint; diarthrosis.

abbreviationnoun (n.) The act of shortening, or reducing.
 noun (n.) The result of abbreviating; an abridgment.
 noun (n.) The form to which a word or phrase is reduced by contraction and omission; a letter or letters, standing for a word or phrase of which they are a part; as, Gen. for Genesis; U.S.A. for United States of America.
 noun (n.) One dash, or more, through the stem of a note, dividing it respectively into quavers, semiquavers, or demi-semiquavers.

abdicationnoun (n.) The act of abdicating; the renunciation of a high office, dignity, or trust, by its holder; commonly the voluntary renunciation of sovereign power; as, abdication of the throne, government, power, authority.

abductionnoun (n.) The act of abducing or abducting; a drawing apart; a carrying away.
 noun (n.) The movement which separates a limb or other part from the axis, or middle line, of the body.
 noun (n.) The wrongful, and usually the forcible, carrying off of a human being; as, the abduction of a child, the abduction of an heiress.
 noun (n.) A syllogism or form of argument in which the major is evident, but the minor is only probable.

aberrationnoun (n.) The act of wandering; deviation, especially from truth or moral rectitude, from the natural state, or from a type.
 noun (n.) A partial alienation of reason.
 noun (n.) A small periodical change of position in the stars and other heavenly bodies, due to the combined effect of the motion of light and the motion of the observer; called annual aberration, when the observer's motion is that of the earth in its orbit, and daily or diurnal aberration, when of the earth on its axis; amounting when greatest, in the former case, to 20.4", and in the latter, to 0.3". Planetary aberration is that due to the motion of light and the motion of the planet relative to the earth.
 noun (n.) The convergence to different foci, by a lens or mirror, of rays of light emanating from one and the same point, or the deviation of such rays from a single focus; called spherical aberration, when due to the spherical form of the lens or mirror, such form giving different foci for central and marginal rays; and chromatic aberration, when due to different refrangibilities of the colored rays of the spectrum, those of each color having a distinct focus.
 noun (n.) The passage of blood or other fluid into parts not appropriate for it.
 noun (n.) The producing of an unintended effect by the glancing of an instrument, as when a shot intended for A glances and strikes B.

abevacuationnoun (n.) A partial evacuation.

abirritationnoun (n.) A pathological condition opposite to that of irritation; debility; want of strength; asthenia.

abjectionnoun (n.) The act of bringing down or humbling.
 noun (n.) The state of being rejected or cast out.
 noun (n.) A low or downcast state; meanness of spirit; abasement; degradation.

abjudicationnoun (n.) Rejection by judicial sentence.

abjurationnoun (n.) The act of abjuring or forswearing; a renunciation upon oath; as, abjuration of the realm, a sworn banishment, an oath taken to leave the country and never to return.
 noun (n.) A solemn recantation or renunciation; as, an abjuration of heresy.

ablactationnoun (n.) The weaning of a child from the breast, or of young beasts from their dam.
 noun (n.) The process of grafting now called inarching, or grafting by approach.

ablaqueationnoun (n.) The act or process of laying bare the roots of trees to expose them to the air and water.

ablationnoun (n.) A carrying or taking away; removal.
 noun (n.) Extirpation.
 noun (n.) Wearing away; superficial waste.

ablegationnoun (n.) The act of sending abroad.

abliguritionnoun (n.) Prodigal expense for food.

ablutionnoun (n.) The act of washing or cleansing; specifically, the washing of the body, or some part of it, as a religious rite.
 noun (n.) The water used in cleansing.
 noun (n.) A small quantity of wine and water, which is used to wash the priest's thumb and index finger after the communion, and which then, as perhaps containing portions of the consecrated elements, is drunk by the priest.

abluvionnoun (n.) That which is washed off.

abnegationnoun (n.) a denial; a renunciation.

abnodationnoun (n.) The act of cutting away the knots of trees.

abolitionnoun (n.) The act of abolishing, or the state of being abolished; an annulling; abrogation; utter destruction; as, the abolition of slavery or the slave trade; the abolition of laws, decrees, ordinances, customs, taxes, debts, etc.

abominationnoun (n.) The feeling of extreme disgust and hatred; abhorrence; detestation; loathing; as, he holds tobacco in abomination.
 noun (n.) That which is abominable; anything hateful, wicked, or shamefully vile; an object or state that excites disgust and hatred; a hateful or shameful vice; pollution.
 noun (n.) A cause of pollution or wickedness.

abortionnoun (n.) The act of giving premature birth; particularly, the expulsion of the human fetus prematurely, or before it is capable of sustaining life; miscarriage.
 noun (n.) The immature product of an untimely birth.
 noun (n.) Arrest of development of any organ, so that it remains an imperfect formation or is absorbed.
 noun (n.) Any fruit or produce that does not come to maturity, or anything which in its progress, before it is matured or perfect; a complete failure; as, his attempt proved an abortion.

abrasionnoun (n.) The act of abrading, wearing, or rubbing off; the wearing away by friction; as, the abrasion of coins.
 noun (n.) The substance rubbed off.
 noun (n.) A superficial excoriation, with loss of substance under the form of small shreds.

abrenunciationnoun (n.) Absolute renunciation or repudiation.

abreptionnoun (n.) A snatching away.

abrogationnoun (n.) The act of abrogating; repeal by authority.

abruptionnoun (n.) A sudden breaking off; a violent separation of bodies.

abscessionnoun (n.) A separating; removal; also, an abscess.

abscisionnoun (n.) See Abscission.

abscissionnoun (n.) The act or process of cutting off.
 noun (n.) The state of being cut off.
 noun (n.) A figure of speech employed when a speaker having begun to say a thing stops abruptly: thus, "He is a man of so much honor and candor, and of such generosity -- but I need say no more."

absentationnoun (n.) The act of absenting one's self.

absolutionnoun (n.) An absolving, or setting free from guilt, sin, or penalty; forgiveness of an offense.
 noun (n.) An acquittal, or sentence of a judge declaring and accused person innocent.
 noun (n.) The exercise of priestly jurisdiction in the sacrament of penance, by which Catholics believe the sins of the truly penitent are forgiven.
 noun (n.) An absolving from ecclesiastical penalties, -- for example, excommunication.
 noun (n.) The form of words by which a penitent is absolved.
 noun (n.) Delivery, in speech.

absorbitionnoun (n.) Absorption.

absorptionnoun (n.) The act or process of absorbing or sucking in anything, or of being absorbed and made to disappear; as, the absorption of bodies in a whirlpool, the absorption of a smaller tribe into a larger.
 noun (n.) An imbibing or reception by molecular or chemical action; as, the absorption of light, heat, electricity, etc.
 noun (n.) In living organisms, the process by which the materials of growth and nutrition are absorbed and conveyed to the tissues and organs.
 noun (n.) Entire engrossment or occupation of the mind; as, absorption in some employment.

abstentionadjective (a.) The act of abstaining; a holding aloof.

abstersionnoun (n.) Act of wiping clean; a cleansing; a purging.

abstractionadjective (a.) The act of abstracting, separating, or withdrawing, or the state of being withdrawn; withdrawal.
 adjective (a.) The act process of leaving out of consideration one or more properties of a complex object so as to attend to others; analysis. Thus, when the mind considers the form of a tree by itself, or the color of the leaves as separate from their size or figure, the act is called abstraction. So, also, when it considers whiteness, softness, virtue, existence, as separate from any particular objects.
 adjective (a.) An idea or notion of an abstract, or theoretical nature; as, to fight for mere abstractions.
 adjective (a.) A separation from worldly objects; a recluse life; as, a hermit's abstraction.
 adjective (a.) Absence or absorption of mind; inattention to present objects.
 adjective (a.) The taking surreptitiously for one's own use part of the property of another; purloining.
 adjective (a.) A separation of volatile parts by the act of distillation.

abstrusionnoun (n.) The act of thrusting away.

absumptionnoun (n.) Act of wasting away; a consuming; extinction.

abutilonnoun (n.) A genus of malvaceous plants of many species, found in the torrid and temperate zones of both continents; -- called also Indian mallow.

accelerationnoun (n.) The act of accelerating, or the state of being accelerated; increase of motion or action; as, a falling body moves toward the earth with an acceleration of velocity; -- opposed to retardation.

accensionnoun (n.) The act of kindling or the state of being kindled; ignition.

accentuationnoun (n.) Act of accentuating; applications of accent.
 noun (n.) pitch or modulation of the voice in reciting portions of the liturgy.

acceptationnoun (n.) Acceptance; reception; favorable reception or regard; state of being acceptable.
 noun (n.) The meaning in which a word or expression is understood, or generally received; as, term is to be used according to its usual acceptation.

acceptilationnoun (n.) Gratuitous discharge; a release from debt or obligation without payment; free remission.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DON (According to first letters):


Rhyming Words According to First 2 Letters (do) - Words That Begins with do:


do.noun (n.) An abbreviation of Ditto.

doingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Do
 noun (n.) Anything done; a deed; an action good or bad; hence, in the plural, conduct; behavior. See Do.

doableadjective (a.) Capable of being done.

dobbernoun (n.) See Dabchick.
 noun (n.) A float to a fishing line.

dobbinnoun (n.) An old jaded horse.
 noun (n.) Sea gravel mixed with sand.

dobchicknoun (n.) See Dabchick.

dobsonnoun (n.) The aquatic larva of a large neuropterous insect (Corydalus cornutus), used as bait in angling. See Hellgamite.

dobulenoun (n.) The European dace.

docentadjective (a.) Serving to instruct; teaching.

docetaenoun (n. pl.) Ancient heretics who held that Christ's body was merely a phantom or appearance.

doceticadjective (a.) Pertaining to, held by, or like, the Docetae.

docetismnoun (n.) The doctrine of the Docetae.

dochmiacadjective (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, the dochmius.

dochmiusnoun (n.) A foot of five syllables (usually / -- -/ -).

docibilitynoun (n.) Alt. of Docibleness

dociblenessnoun (n.) Aptness for being taught; teachableness; docility.

docibleadjective (a.) Easily taught or managed; teachable.

docileadjective (a.) Teachable; easy to teach; docible.
 adjective (a.) Disposed to be taught; tractable; easily managed; as, a docile child.

docilitynoun (n.) teachableness; aptness for being taught; docibleness.
 noun (n.) Willingness to be taught; tractableness.

docimacynoun (n.) The art or practice of applying tests to ascertain the nature, quality, etc., of objects, as of metals or ores, of medicines, or of facts pertaining to physiology.

docimasticadjective (a.) Proving by experiments or tests.

docimologynoun (n.) A treatise on the art of testing, as in assaying metals, etc.

docitynoun (n.) Teachableness.

docknoun (n.) A genus of plants (Rumex), some species of which are well-known weeds which have a long taproot and are difficult of extermination.
 noun (n.) The solid part of an animal's tail, as distinguished from the hair; the stump of a tail; the part of a tail left after clipping or cutting.
 noun (n.) A case of leather to cover the clipped or cut tail of a horse.
 noun (n.) An artificial basin or an inclosure in connection with a harbor or river, -- used for the reception of vessels, and provided with gates for keeping in or shutting out the tide.
 noun (n.) The slip or water way extending between two piers or projecting wharves, for the reception of ships; -- sometimes including the piers themselves; as, to be down on the dock.
 noun (n.) The place in court where a criminal or accused person stands.
 verb (v. t.) to cut off, as the end of a thing; to curtail; to cut short; to clip; as, to dock the tail of a horse.
 verb (v. t.) To cut off a part from; to shorten; to deduct from; to subject to a deduction; as, to dock one's wages.
 verb (v. t.) To cut off, bar, or destroy; as, to dock an entail.
 verb (v. t.) To draw, law, or place (a ship) in a dock, for repairing, cleaning the bottom, etc.

dockingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Dock

dockagenoun (n.) A charge for the use of a dock.

docketnoun (n.) A small piece of paper or parchment, containing the heads of a writing; a summary or digest.
 noun (n.) A bill tied to goods, containing some direction, as the name of the owner, or the place to which they are to be sent; a label.
 noun (n.) An abridged entry of a judgment or proceeding in an action, or register or such entries; a book of original, kept by clerks of courts, containing a formal list of the names of parties, and minutes of the proceedings, in each case in court.
 noun (n.) A list or calendar of causes ready for hearing or trial, prepared for the use of courts by the clerks.
 noun (n.) A list or calendar of business matters to be acted on in any assembly.
 verb (v. t.) To make a brief abstract of (a writing) and indorse it on the back of the paper, or to indorse the title or contents on the back of; to summarize; as, to docket letters and papers.
 verb (v. t.) To make a brief abstract of and inscribe in a book; as, judgments regularly docketed.
 verb (v. t.) To enter or inscribe in a docket, or list of causes for trial.
 verb (v. t.) To mark with a ticket; as, to docket goods.

docketingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Docket

dockyardnoun (n.) A yard or storage place for all sorts of naval stores and timber for shipbuilding.

docoglossanoun (n. pl.) An order of gastropods, including the true limpets, and having the teeth on the odontophore or lingual ribbon.

docquetnoun (n. & v.) See Docket.

doctornoun (n.) A teacher; one skilled in a profession, or branch of knowledge learned man.
 noun (n.) An academical title, originally meaning a men so well versed in his department as to be qualified to teach it. Hence: One who has taken the highest degree conferred by a university or college, or has received a diploma of the highest degree; as, a doctor of divinity, of law, of medicine, of music, or of philosophy. Such diplomas may confer an honorary title only.
 noun (n.) One duly licensed to practice medicine; a member of the medical profession; a physician.
 noun (n.) Any mechanical contrivance intended to remedy a difficulty or serve some purpose in an exigency; as, the doctor of a calico-printing machine, which is a knife to remove superfluous coloring matter; the doctor, or auxiliary engine, called also donkey engine.
 noun (n.) The friar skate.
 verb (v. t.) To treat as a physician does; to apply remedies to; to repair; as, to doctor a sick man or a broken cart.
 verb (v. t.) To confer a doctorate upon; to make a doctor.
 verb (v. t.) To tamper with and arrange for one's own purposes; to falsify; to adulterate; as, to doctor election returns; to doctor whisky.
 verb (v. i.) To practice physic.

doctoringnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Doctor

doctoraladjective (a.) Of or relating to a doctor, or to the degree of doctor.

doctoratenoun (n.) The degree, title, or rank, of a doctor.
 verb (v. t.) To make (one) a doctor.

doctoressnoun (n.) A female doctor.

doctorlyadjective (a.) Like a doctor or learned man.

doctorshipnoun (n.) Doctorate.

doctressnoun (n.) A female doctor.

doctrinableadjective (a.) Of the nature of, or constituting, doctrine.

doctrinairenoun (n.) One who would apply to political or other practical concerns the abstract doctrines or the theories of his own philosophical system; a propounder of a new set of opinions; a dogmatic theorist. Used also adjectively; as, doctrinaire notions.

doctrinalnoun (n.) A matter of doctrine; also, a system of doctrines.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, or containing, doctrine or something taught and to be believed; as, a doctrinal observation.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to, or having to do with, teaching.

doctrinariannoun (n.) A doctrinaire.

doctrinarianismnoun (n.) The principles or practices of the Doctrinaires.

doctrinenoun (n.) Teaching; instruction.
 noun (n.) That which is taught; what is held, put forth as true, and supported by a teacher, a school, or a sect; a principle or position, or the body of principles, in any branch of knowledge; any tenet or dogma; a principle of faith; as, the doctrine of atoms; the doctrine of chances.

documentnoun (n.) That which is taught or authoritatively set forth; precept; instruction; dogma.
 noun (n.) An example for instruction or warning.
 noun (n.) An original or official paper relied upon as the basis, proof, or support of anything else; -- in its most extended sense, including any writing, book, or other instrument conveying information in the case; any material substance on which the thoughts of men are represented by any species of conventional mark or symbol.
 verb (v. t.) To teach; to school.
 verb (v. t.) To furnish with documents or papers necessary to establish facts or give information; as, a a ship should be documented according to the directions of law.

documentaladjective (a.) Of or pertaining to instruction.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to written evidence; documentary; as, documental testimony.

documentaryadjective (a.) Pertaining to written evidence; contained or certified in writing.

doddartnoun (n.) A game much like hockey, played in an open field; also, the, bent stick for playing the game.

doddedadjective (a.) Without horns; as, dodded cattle; without beards; as, dodded corn.

ENGLISH WORDS BOTH FIRST AND LAST LETTERS RHYMING WITH DON:

English Words which starts with 'd' and ends with 'n':

daciannoun (n.) A native of ancient Dacia.
 adjective (a.) Of or pertaining to Dacia or the Dacians.

daedalianadjective (a.) Cunningly or ingeniously formed or working; skillful; artistic; ingenious.
 adjective (a.) Crafty; deceitful.

daemonadjective (a.) Alt. of Daemonic

dagonnoun (n.) A slip or piece.
  () The national god of the Philistines, represented with the face and hands and upper part of a man, and the tail of a fish.

dagswainnoun (n.) A coarse woolen fabric made of daglocks, or the refuse of wool.

daguerreanadjective (a.) Alt. of Daguerreian

daguerreianadjective (a.) Pertaining to Daguerre, or to his invention of the daguerreotype.

dahlinnoun (n.) A variety of starch extracted from the dahlia; -- called also inulin. See Inulin.

dairymannoun (n.) A man who keeps or takes care of a dairy.

dairywomannoun (n.) A woman who attends to a dairy.

dalesmannoun (n.) One living in a dale; -- a term applied particularly to the inhabitants of the valleys in the north of England, Norway, etc.

dalmatianadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to Dalmatia.

daltoniannoun (n.) One afflicted with color blindness.

damannoun (n.) A small herbivorous mammal of the genus Hyrax. The species found in Palestine and Syria is Hyrax Syriacus; that of Northern Africa is H. Brucei; -- called also ashkoko, dassy, and rock rabbit. See Cony, and Hyrax.

damaskinnoun (n.) A sword of Damask steel.

damassinnoun (n.) A kind of modified damask or brocade.

damnationnoun (n.) The state of being damned; condemnation; openly expressed disapprobation.
 noun (n.) Condemnation to everlasting punishment in the future state, or the punishment itself.
 noun (n.) A sin deserving of everlasting punishment.

damnificationnoun (n.) That which causes damage or loss.

damsonnoun (n.) A small oval plum of a blue color, the fruit of a variety of the Prunus domestica; -- called also damask plum.

dannoun (n.) A title of honor equivalent to master, or sir.
 noun (n.) A small truck or sledge used in coal mines.

dandelionnoun (n.) A well-known plant of the genus Taraxacum (T. officinale, formerly called T. Dens-leonis and Leontodos Taraxacum) bearing large, yellow, compound flowers, and deeply notched leaves.

danteanadjective (a.) Relating to, emanating from or resembling, the poet Dante or his writings.

danubianadjective (a.) Pertaining to, or bordering on, the river Danube.

daphnetinnoun (n.) A colorless crystalline substance, C9H6O4, extracted from daphnin.

daphninnoun (n.) A dark green bitter resin extracted from the mezereon (Daphne mezereum) and regarded as the essential principle of the plant.
 noun (n.) A white, crystalline, bitter substance, regarded as a glucoside, and extracted from Daphne mezereum and D. alpina.

dardaniannoun (a. & n.) Trojan.

darkenadjective (a.) To make dark or black; to deprive of light; to obscure; as, a darkened room.
 adjective (a.) To render dim; to deprive of vision.
 adjective (a.) To cloud, obscure, or perplex; to render less clear or intelligible.
 adjective (a.) To cast a gloom upon.
 adjective (a.) To make foul; to sully; to tarnish.
 verb (v. i.) To grow or darker.

darnnoun (n.) A place mended by darning.
 verb (v. t.) To mend as a rent or hole, with interlacing stitches of yarn or thread by means of a needle; to sew together with yarn or thread.
 verb (v. t.) A colloquial euphemism for Damn.

darreinadjective (a.) Last; as, darrein continuance, the last continuance.

darwiniannoun (n.) An advocate of Darwinism.
 adjective (a.) Pertaining to Darwin; as, the Darwinian theory, a theory of the manner and cause of the supposed development of living things from certain original forms or elements.

datiscinnoun (n.) A white crystalline glucoside extracted from the bastard hemp (Datisca cannabina).

daunnoun (n.) A variant of Dan, a title of honor.

dauphinnoun (n.) The title of the eldest son of the king of France, and heir to the crown. Since the revolution of 1830, the title has been discontinued.

dawnnoun (n.) The break of day; the first appearance of light in the morning; show of approaching sunrise.
 noun (n.) First opening or expansion; first appearance; beginning; rise.
 verb (v. i.) To begin to grow light in the morning; to grow light; to break, or begin to appear; as, the day dawns; the morning dawns.
 verb (v. i.) To began to give promise; to begin to appear or to expand.

daysmannoun (n.) An umpire or arbiter; a mediator.

daywomannoun (n.) A dairymaid.

deaconnoun (n.) An officer in Christian churches appointed to perform certain subordinate duties varying in different communions. In the Roman Catholic and Episcopal churches, a person admitted to the lowest order in the ministry, subordinate to the bishops and priests. In Presbyterian churches, he is subordinate to the minister and elders, and has charge of certain duties connected with the communion service and the care of the poor. In Congregational churches, he is subordinate to the pastor, and has duties as in the Presbyterian church.
 noun (n.) The chairman of an incorporated company.
 verb (v. t.) To read aloud each line of (a psalm or hymn) before singing it, -- usually with off.
 verb (v. t.) With humorous reference to hypocritical posing: To pack (fruit or vegetables) with the finest specimens on top; to alter slyly the boundaries of (land); to adulterate or doctor (an article to be sold), etc.

deadbornadjective (a.) Stillborn.

deadenadjective (a.) To make as dead; to impair in vigor, force, activity, or sensation; to lessen the force or acuteness of; to blunt; as, to deaden the natural powers or feelings; to deaden a sound.
 adjective (a.) To lessen the velocity or momentum of; to retard; as, to deaden a ship's headway.
 adjective (a.) To make vapid or spiritless; as, to deaden wine.
 adjective (a.) To deprive of gloss or brilliancy; to obscure; as, to deaden gilding by a coat of size.
 verb (v. t.) To render impervious to sound, as a wall or floor; to deafen.

dealbationnoun (n.) Act of bleaching; a whitening.

deambulationnoun (n.) A walking abroad; a promenading.

deannoun (n.) A dignitary or presiding officer in certain ecclesiastical and lay bodies; esp., an ecclesiastical dignitary, subordinate to a bishop.
 noun (n.) The collegiate officer in the universities of Oxford and Cambridge, England, who, besides other duties, has regard to the moral condition of the college.
 noun (n.) The head or presiding officer in the faculty of some colleges or universities.
 noun (n.) A registrar or secretary of the faculty in a department of a college, as in a medical, or theological, or scientific department.
 noun (n.) The chief or senior of a company on occasion of ceremony; as, the dean of the diplomatic corps; -- so called by courtesy.

dearbornnoun (n.) A four-wheeled carriage, with curtained sides.

dearnadjective (a.) Secret; lonely; solitary; dreadful.
 verb (v. t.) Same as Darn.

deathsmannoun (n.) An executioner; a headsman or hangman.

deaurationnoun (n.) Act of gilding.

debacchationnoun (n.) Wild raving or debauchery.

debarkationnoun (n.) Disembarkation.

debellationnoun (n.) The act of conquering or subduing.

debilitationnoun (n.) The act or process of debilitating, or the condition of one who is debilitated; weakness.

debituminizationnoun (n.) The act of depriving of bitumen.

debulitionnoun (n.) A bubbling or boiling over.

decachordonnoun (n.) An ancient Greek musical instrument of ten strings, resembling the harp.
 noun (n.) Something consisting of ten parts.

decagonnoun (n.) A plane figure having ten sides and ten angles; any figure having ten angles. A regular decagon is one that has all its sides and angles equal.

decagynianadjective (a.) Alt. of Deccagynous

decahedronnoun (n.) A solid figure or body inclosed by ten plane surfaces.

decalcificationnoun (n.) The removal of calcareous matter.

decameronnoun (n.) A celebrated collection of tales, supposed to be related in ten days; -- written in the 14th century, by Boccaccio, an Italian.

decandrianadjective (a.) Alt. of Decandrous

decantationnoun (n.) The act of pouring off a clear liquor gently from its lees or sediment, or from one vessel into another.

decapitationnoun (n.) The act of beheading; beheading.

decarbonizationnoun (n.) The action or process of depriving a substance of carbon.

decarburizationnoun (n.) The act, process, or result of decarburizing.

decentralizationnoun (n.) The action of decentralizing, or the state of being decentralized.

deceptionnoun (n.) The act of deceiving or misleading.
 noun (n.) The state of being deceived or misled.
 noun (n.) That which deceives or is intended to deceive; false representation; artifice; cheat; fraud.

decerptionnoun (n.) The act of plucking off; a cropping.
 noun (n.) That which is plucked off or rent away; a fragment; a piece.

decertationnoun (n.) Contest for mastery; contention; strife.

decessionnoun (n.) Departure; decrease; -- opposed to accesion.

decillionnoun (n.) According to the English notation, a million involved to the tenth power, or a unit with sixty ciphers annexed; according to the French and American notation, a thousand involved to the eleventh power, or a unit with thirty-three ciphers annexed. [See the Note under Numeration.]

decimationnoun (n.) A tithing.
 noun (n.) A selection of every tenth person by lot, as for punishment.
 noun (n.) The destruction of any large proportion, as of people by pestilence or war.

decisionnoun (n.) Cutting off; division; detachment of a part.
 noun (n.) The act of deciding; act of settling or terminating, as a controversy, by giving judgment on the matter at issue; determination, as of a question or doubt; settlement; conclusion.
 noun (n.) An account or report of a conclusion, especially of a legal adjudication or judicial determination of a question or cause; as, a decision of arbitrators; a decision of the Supreme Court.
 noun (n.) The quality of being decided; prompt and fixed determination; unwavering firmness; as, to manifest great decision.

declamationnoun (n.) The act or art of declaiming; rhetorical delivery; haranguing; loud speaking in public; especially, the public recitation of speeches as an exercise in schools and colleges; as, the practice declamation by students.
 noun (n.) A set or harangue; declamatory discourse.
 noun (n.) Pretentious rhetorical display, with more sound than sense; as, mere declamation.

declarationnoun (n.) The act of declaring, or publicly announcing; explicit asserting; undisguised token of a ground or side taken on any subject; proclamation; exposition; as, the declaration of an opinion; a declaration of war, etc.
 noun (n.) That which is declared or proclaimed; announcement; distinct statement; formal expression; avowal.
 noun (n.) The document or instrument containing such statement or proclamation; as, the Declaration of Independence (now preserved in Washington).
 noun (n.) That part of the process in which the plaintiff sets forth in order and at large his cause of complaint; the narration of the plaintiff's case containing the count, or counts. See Count, n., 3.

declensionnoun (n.) The act or the state of declining; declination; descent; slope.
 noun (n.) A falling off towards a worse state; a downward tendency; deterioration; decay; as, the declension of virtue, of science, of a state, etc.
 noun (n.) Act of courteously refusing; act of declining; a declinature; refusal; as, the declension of a nomination.
 noun (n.) Inflection of nouns, adjectives, etc., according to the grammatical cases.
 noun (n.) The form of the inflection of a word declined by cases; as, the first or the second declension of nouns, adjectives, etc.
 noun (n.) Rehearsing a word as declined.

declinationnoun (n.) The act or state of bending downward; inclination; as, declination of the head.
 noun (n.) The act or state of falling off or declining from excellence or perfection; deterioration; decay; decline.
 noun (n.) The act of deviating or turning aside; oblique motion; obliquity; withdrawal.
 noun (n.) The act or state of declining or refusing; withdrawal; refusal; averseness.
 noun (n.) The angular distance of any object from the celestial equator, either northward or southward.
 noun (n.) The arc of the horizon, contained between the vertical plane and the prime vertical circle, if reckoned from the east or west, or between the meridian and the plane, reckoned from the north or south.
 noun (n.) The act of inflecting a word; declension. See Decline, v. t., 4.

decoctionnoun (n.) The act or process of boiling anything in a watery fluid to extract its virtues.
 noun (n.) An extract got from a body by boiling it in water.

decollationnoun (n.) The act of beheading or state of one beheaded; -- especially used of the execution of St. John the Baptist.
 noun (n.) A painting representing the beheading of a saint or martyr, esp. of St. John the Baptist.

decolorationnoun (n.) The removal or absence of color.

decompositionnoun (n.) The act or process of resolving the constituent parts of a compound body or substance into its elementary parts; separation into constituent part; analysis; the decay or dissolution consequent on the removal or alteration of some of the ingredients of a compound; disintegration; as, the decomposition of wood, rocks, etc.
 noun (n.) The state of being reduced into original elements.
 noun (n.) Repeated composition; a combination of compounds.

deconcentrationnoun (n.) Act of deconcentrating.

decorationnoun (n.) The act of adorning, embellishing, or honoring; ornamentation.
 noun (n.) That which adorns, enriches, or beautifies; something added by way of embellishment; ornament.
 noun (n.) Specifically, any mark of honor to be worn upon the person, as a medal, cross, or ribbon of an order of knighthood, bestowed for services in war, great achievements in literature, art, etc.

decorticationnoun (n.) The act of stripping off the bark, rind, hull, or outer coat.

decreationnoun (n.) Destruction; -- opposed to creation.

decrepitationnoun (n.) The act of decrepitating; a crackling noise, such as salt makes when roasting.

decretionnoun (n.) A decrease.

decrustationnoun (n.) The removal of a crust.

decubationnoun (n.) Act of lying down; decumbence.

decumanadjective (a.) Large; chief; -- applied to an extraordinary billow, supposed by some to be every tenth in order. [R.] Also used substantively.

decurionnoun (n.) A head or chief over ten; especially, an officer who commanded a division of ten soldiers.

decursionnoun (n.) A flowing; also, a hostile incursion.

decurtationnoun (n.) Act of cutting short.

decussationnoun (n.) Act of crossing at an acute angle, or state of being thus crossed; an intersection in the form of an X; as, the decussation of lines, nerves, etc.

dedalianadjective (a.) See Daedalian.

dedecorationnoun (n.) Disgrace; dishonor.

dedentitionnoun (n.) The shedding of teeth.

dedicationnoun (n.) The act of setting apart or consecrating to a divine Being, or to a sacred use, often with religious solemnities; solemn appropriation; as, the dedication of Solomon's temple.
 noun (n.) A devoting or setting aside for any particular purpose; as, a dedication of lands to public use.
 noun (n.) An address to a patron or friend, prefixed to a book, testifying respect, and often recommending the work to his special protection and favor.

deditionnoun (n.) The act of yielding; surrender.

deductionnoun (n.) Act or process of deducing or inferring.
 noun (n.) Act of deducting or taking away; subtraction; as, the deduction of the subtrahend from the minuend.
 noun (n.) That which is deduced or drawn from premises by a process of reasoning; an inference; a conclusion.
 noun (n.) That which is deducted; the part taken away; abatement; as, a deduction from the yearly rent.

deduplicationnoun (n.) The division of that which is morphologically one organ into two or more, as the division of an organ of a plant into a pair or cluster.

deerskinnoun (n.) The skin of a deer, or the leather which is made from it.