Name Report For First Name DEMASON:


First name DEMASON's origin is English. DEMASON means "judge's son". You can find other first names and English words that rhymes with DEMASON below. Ryhme list involves the matching sounds according to the first letters, last letters and first&last letters of demason.(Brown names are of the same origin (English) with DEMASON and Red names are first names with English/Anglo-Saxon origin)

Rhymes with DEMASON - Names & Words

First Names Rhyming DEMASON



NAMES RHYMING WITH DEMASON (According to last letters):

Rhyming Names According to Last 6 Letters (emason) - Names That Ends with emason:

Rhyming Names According to Last 5 Letters (mason) - Names That Ends with mason:


Rhyming Names According to Last 4 Letters (ason) - Names That Ends with ason:

iason jason eason neason

Rhyming Names According to Last 3 Letters (son) - Names That Ends with son:

harrison pierson rawson aeson hanson son addyson ailison alyson crimson ellison emerson maddison madison mattison raison adalson addison aliceson alison alson anderson anson atkinson benson branson brantson brookson bryson carlson carson charleson chayson clayson colson davidson davison dawson dayson dennison dickson eallison eddison edson edwardson elson eorlson esrlson farquharson ferguson fergusson garrson garson grayson gregson greyson henderson henson jackson jakson jameson jamieson jamison jayson johnson judson kadison kaison larson macpherson masson matheson matson morrison nelson nickson nicson nikson ourson parkinson paulson pearson perkinson peterson pherson randson robertson rowson ruadson sampson sanderson saunderson simson stephenson stetson

NAMES RHYMING WITH DEMASON (According to first letters):

Rhyming Names According to First 6 Letters (demaso) - Names That Begins with demaso:

Rhyming Names According to First 5 Letters (demas) - Names That Begins with demas:


Rhyming Names According to First 4 Letters (dema) - Names That Begins with dema:

deman demarcus demario

Rhyming Names According to First 3 Letters (dem) - Names That Begins with dem:

demelza demet demeter demetri demetria demetrius demi demissie demodocus demogorgon demophon demos demothi dempsey dempster

Rhyming Names According to First 2 Letters (de) - Names That Begins with de:

dea deacon deagan deaglan deagmund deakin dealbeorht dealber dealbert dean deana deanda deandra deandrea deandria deane deann deanna deanne dearbhail dearborn dearbourne deardriu dearg deasach deasmumhan deavon debbee debbie debby debora deborah debra debrah debralee dechtere dechtire decla declan dedr dedre dedric dedrick dedrik dee deeana deeandra deeann deeanna deedra deegan deems deen deena deerwa deerward defena dehaan deheune deianira deidra deidre deiene deikun deina deiphobus deirdra deirdre deja deka deke dekel dekle del delaine delancy delane delaney delanie delano delbert


First Names which starts with 'dem' and ends with 'son':

First Names which starts with 'de' and ends with 'on':

delmon delron delton delvon denton deon deron dervon deston deucalion deveon devion devlon devon devron

First Names which starts with 'd' and ends with 'n':

dacian daegan daelan daelyn daelynn daemon dagan dagen dagian daijon dailyn daimhin daimmen dain dainan dairion dalan dalen dallan dallen dallin dallon dalon dalston dalton dalyn dalynn daman damen dameon damian damiean damien damon dan danathon daniel-sean dann dannon danon danton danylynn daran dareen daren darien darin darleen darolyn daron darrellyn darren darrin darron darryn dartagnan darton darvin darwin darwyn darylyn daryn daveen daveon davian davin davion davynn dawn daxton daylan daylen daylin daylon dayton dayveon delbin delman delsin delvin den deneen deoradhain deortun derian

English Words Rhyming DEMASON


ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DEMASON (According to last letters):

Rhyming Words According to Last 6 Letters (emason) - English Words That Ends with emason:

freemasonnoun (n.) One of an ancient and secret association or fraternity, said to have been at first composed of masons or builders in stone, but now consisting of persons who are united for social enjoyment and mutual assistance.

Rhyming Words According to Last 5 Letters (mason) - English Words That Ends with mason:

antimasonnoun (n.) One opposed to Freemasonry.

masonnoun (n.) One whose occupation is to build with stone or brick; also, one who prepares stone for building purposes.
 noun (n.) A member of the fraternity of Freemasons. See Freemason.
 verb (v. t.) To build stonework or brickwork about, under, in, over, etc.; to construct by masons; -- with a prepositional suffix; as, to mason up a well or terrace; to mason in a kettle or boiler.

Rhyming Words According to Last 4 Letters (ason) - English Words That Ends with ason:

basonnoun (n.) A basin.

cargasonnoun (n.) A cargo.

diapasonnoun (n.) The octave, or interval which includes all the tones of the diatonic scale.
 noun (n.) Concord, as of notes an octave apart; harmony.
 noun (n.) The entire compass of tones.
 noun (n.) A standard of pitch; a tuning fork; as, the French normal diapason.
 noun (n.) One of certain stops in the organ, so called because they extend through the scale of the instrument. They are of several kinds, as open diapason, stopped diapason, double diapason, and the like.

disdiapasonnoun (n.) An interval of two octaves, or a fifteenth; -- called also bisdiapason.

encheasonnoun (n.) Occasion, cause, or reason.

geasonadjective (a.) Rare; wonderful.

reasonnoun (n.) A thought or a consideration offered in support of a determination or an opinion; a just ground for a conclusion or an action; that which is offered or accepted as an explanation; the efficient cause of an occurrence or a phenomenon; a motive for an action or a determination; proof, more or less decisive, for an opinion or a conclusion; principle; efficient cause; final cause; ground of argument.
 noun (n.) The faculty or capacity of the human mind by which it is distinguished from the intelligence of the inferior animals; the higher as distinguished from the lower cognitive faculties, sense, imagination, and memory, and in contrast to the feelings and desires. Reason comprises conception, judgment, reasoning, and the intuitional faculty. Specifically, it is the intuitional faculty, or the faculty of first truths, as distinguished from the understanding, which is called the discursive or ratiocinative faculty.
 noun (n.) Due exercise of the reasoning faculty; accordance with, or that which is accordant with and ratified by, the mind rightly exercised; right intellectual judgment; clear and fair deductions from true principles; that which is dictated or supported by the common sense of mankind; right conduct; right; propriety; justice.
 noun (n.) Ratio; proportion.
 noun (n.) To exercise the rational faculty; to deduce inferences from premises; to perform the process of deduction or of induction; to ratiocinate; to reach conclusions by a systematic comparison of facts.
 noun (n.) Hence: To carry on a process of deduction or of induction, in order to convince or to confute; to formulate and set forth propositions and the inferences from them; to argue.
 noun (n.) To converse; to compare opinions.
 verb (v. t.) To arrange and present the reasons for or against; to examine or discuss by arguments; to debate or discuss; as, I reasoned the matter with my friend.
 verb (v. t.) To support with reasons, as a request.
 verb (v. t.) To persuade by reasoning or argument; as, to reason one into a belief; to reason one out of his plan.
 verb (v. t.) To overcome or conquer by adducing reasons; -- with down; as, to reason down a passion.
 verb (v. t.) To find by logical processes; to explain or justify by reason or argument; -- usually with out; as, to reason out the causes of the librations of the moon.

seasonnoun (n.) One of the divisions of the year, marked by alternations in the length of day and night, or by distinct conditions of temperature, moisture, etc., caused mainly by the relative position of the earth with respect to the sun. In the north temperate zone, four seasons, namely, spring, summer, autumn, and winter, are generally recognized. Some parts of the world have three seasons, -- the dry, the rainy, and the cold; other parts have but two, -- the dry and the rainy.
 noun (n.) Hence, a period of time, especially as regards its fitness for anything contemplated or done; a suitable or convenient time; proper conjuncture; as, the season for planting; the season for rest.
 noun (n.) A period of time not very long; a while; a time.
 noun (n.) That which gives relish; seasoning.
 verb (v. t.) To render suitable or appropriate; to prepare; to fit.
 verb (v. t.) To fit for any use by time or habit; to habituate; to accustom; to inure; to ripen; to mature; as, to season one to a climate.
 verb (v. t.) Hence, to prepare by drying or hardening, or removal of natural juices; as, to season timber.
 verb (v. t.) To fit for taste; to render palatable; to give zest or relish to; to spice; as, to season food.
 verb (v. t.) Hence, to fit for enjoyment; to render agrecable.
 verb (v. t.) To qualify by admixture; to moderate; to temper.
 verb (v. t.) To imbue; to tinge or taint.
 verb (v. t.) To copulate with; to impregnate.
 verb (v. i.) To become mature; to grow fit for use; to become adapted to a climate.
 verb (v. i.) To become dry and hard, by the escape of the natural juices, or by being penetrated with other substance; as, timber seasons in the sun.
 verb (v. i.) To give token; to savor.

semidiapasonnoun (n.) An imperfect octave.

treasonnoun (n.) The offense of attempting to overthrow the government of the state to which the offender owes allegiance, or of betraying the state into the hands of a foreign power; disloyalty; treachery.
 noun (n.) Loosely, the betrayal of any trust or confidence; treachery; perfidy.

tridiapasonnoun (n.) A triple octave, or twenty-second.

unreasonnoun (n.) Want of reason; unreasonableness; absurdity.
 verb (v. t.) To undo, disprove, or refute by reasoning.

Rhyming Words According to Last 3 Letters (son) - English Words That Ends with son:

advowsonnoun (n.) The right of presenting to a vacant benefice or living in the church. [Originally, the relation of a patron (advocatus) or protector of a benefice, and thus privileged to nominate or present to it.]

arsonnoun (n.) The malicious burning of a dwelling house or outhouse of another man, which by the common law is felony; the malicious and voluntary firing of a building or ship.

bawsonnoun (n.) A badger.
 noun (n.) A large, unwieldy person.

benisonnoun (n.) Blessing; beatitude; benediction.

bisonnoun (n.) The aurochs or European bison.
 noun (n.) The American bison buffalo (Bison Americanus), a large, gregarious bovine quadruped with shaggy mane and short black horns, which formerly roamed in herds over most of the temperate portion of North America, but is now restricted to very limited districts in the region of the Rocky Mountains, and is rapidly decreasing in numbers.

bissonadjective (a.) Purblind; blinding.

bosonnoun (n.) See Boatswain.

caissonnoun (n.) A chest to hold ammunition.
 noun (n.) A four-wheeled carriage for conveying ammunition, consisting of two parts, a body and a limber. In light field batteries there is one caisson to each piece, having two ammunition boxes on the body, and one on the limber.
 noun (n.) A chest filled with explosive materials, to be laid in the way of an enemy and exploded on his approach.
 noun (n.) A water-tight box, of timber or iron within which work is carried on in building foundations or structures below the water level.
 noun (n.) A hollow floating box, usually of iron, which serves to close the entrances of docks and basins.
 noun (n.) A structure, usually with an air chamber, placed beneath a vessel to lift or float it.
 noun (n.) A sunk panel of ceilings or soffits.

caparisonnoun (n.) An ornamental covering or housing for a horse; the harness or trappings of a horse, taken collectively, esp. when decorative.
 noun (n.) Gay or rich clothing.
 verb (v. t.) To cover with housings, as a horse; to harness or fit out with decorative trappings, as a horse.
 verb (v. t.) To aborn with rich dress; to dress.

cavessonnoun (n.) Alt. of Cavezon

chansonnoun (n.) A song.

comparisonnoun (n.) The act of comparing; an examination of two or more objects with the view of discovering the resemblances or differences; relative estimate.
 noun (n.) The state of being compared; a relative estimate; also, a state, quality, or relation, admitting of being compared; as, to bring a thing into comparison with another; there is no comparison between them.
 noun (n.) That to which, or with which, a thing is compared, as being equal or like; illustration; similitude.
 noun (n.) The modification, by inflection or otherwise, which the adjective and adverb undergo to denote degrees of quality or quantity; as, little, less, least, are examples of comparison.
 noun (n.) A figure by which one person or thing is compared to another, or the two are considered with regard to some property or quality, which is common to them both; e.g., the lake sparkled like a jewel.
 noun (n.) The faculty of the reflective group which is supposed to perceive resemblances and contrasts.
 verb (v. t.) To compare.

crimsonnoun (n.) A deep red color tinged with blue; also, red color in general.
 adjective (a.) Of a deep red color tinged with blue; deep red.
 verb (v. t.) To dye with crimson or deep red; to redden.
  (b. t.) To become crimson; to blush.

damsonnoun (n.) A small oval plum of a blue color, the fruit of a variety of the Prunus domestica; -- called also damask plum.

disherisonnoun (n.) The act of disheriting, or debarring from inheritance; disinhersion.

disputisonnoun (n.) Dispute; discussion.

dobsonnoun (n.) The aquatic larva of a large neuropterous insect (Corydalus cornutus), used as bait in angling. See Hellgamite.

dorsimesonnoun (n.) (Anat.) See Meson.

elisonnoun (n.) Division; separation.
 noun (n.) The cutting off or suppression of a vowel or syllable, for the sake of meter or euphony; esp., in poetry, the dropping of a final vowel standing before an initial vowel in the following word, when the two words are drawn together.

empoisonnoun (n.) Poison.
 verb (v. t.) To poison; to impoison.

enchesonnoun (n.) Alt. of Encheason

flotsonnoun (n.) Goods lost by shipwreck, and floating on the sea; -- in distinction from jetsam or jetson.

foisonnoun (n.) Rich harvest; plenty; abundance.

foysonnoun (n.) See Foison.

gambesonnoun (n.) Same as Gambison.

gambisonnoun (n.) A defensive garment formerly in use for the body, made of cloth stuffed and quilted.

garrisonnoun (n.) A body of troops stationed in a fort or fortified town.
 noun (n.) A fortified place, in which troops are quartered for its security.
 verb (v. t.) To place troops in, as a fortification, for its defense; to furnish with soldiers; as, to garrison a fort or town.
 verb (v. t.) To secure or defend by fortresses manned with troops; as, to garrison a conquered territory.

godsonnoun (n.) A male for whom one has stood sponsor in baptism. See Godfather.

grandsonnoun (n.) A son's or daughter's son.

grisonnoun (n.) A South American animal of the family Mustelidae (Galictis vittata). It is about two feet long, exclusive of the tail. Its under parts are black. Also called South American glutton.
 noun (n.) A South American monkey (Lagothrix infumatus), said to be gluttonous.

herissonnoun (n.) A beam or bar armed with iron spikes, and turning on a pivot; -- used to block up a passage.

hysonnoun (n.) A fragrant kind of green tea.

intercomparisonnoun (n.) Mutual comparison of corresponding parts.

jetsonnoun (n.) Goods which sink when cast into the sea, and remain under water; -- distinguished from flotsam, goods which float, and ligan, goods which are sunk attached to a buoy.
 noun (n.) Jettison. See Jettison, 1.

jettisonnoun (n.) The throwing overboard of goods from necessity, in order to lighten a vessel in danger of wreck.
 noun (n.) See Jetsam, 1.

keelsonnoun (n.) A piece of timber in a ship laid on the middle of the floor timbers over the keel, and binding the floor timbers to the keel; in iron vessels, a structure of plates, situated like the keelson of a timber ship.

kelsonnoun (n.) See Keelson.

lessonnoun (n.) Anything read or recited to a teacher by a pupil or learner; something, as a portion of a book, assigned to a pupil to be studied or learned at one time.
 noun (n.) That which is learned or taught by an express effort; instruction derived from precept, experience, observation, or deduction; a precept; a doctrine; as, to take or give a lesson in drawing.
 noun (n.) A portion of Scripture read in divine service for instruction; as, here endeth the first lesson.
 noun (n.) A severe lecture; reproof; rebuke; warning.
 noun (n.) An exercise; a composition serving an educational purpose; a study.
 verb (v. t.) To teach; to instruct.

lewissonnoun (n.) An iron dovetailed tenon, made in sections, which can be fitted into a dovetail mortise; -- used in hoisting large stones, etc.
 noun (n.) A kind of shears used in cropping woolen cloth.

liaisonnoun (n.) A union, or bond of union; an intimacy; especially, an illicit intimacy between a man and a woman.

livraisonnoun (n.) A part of a book or literary composition printed and delivered by itself; a number; a part.

malisonnoun (n.) Malediction; curse; execration.

mesonnoun (n.) The mesial plane dividing the body of an animal into similar right and left halves. The line in which it meets the dorsal surface has been called the dorsimeson, and the corresponding ventral edge the ventrimeson.

nupsonnoun (n.) A simpleton; a fool.

oraisonnoun (n.) See Orison.

orisonnoun (n.) A prayer; a supplication.

parsonnoun (n.) A person who represents a parish in its ecclesiastical and corporate capacities; hence, the rector or incumbent of a parochial church, who has full possession of all the rights thereof, with the cure of souls.
 noun (n.) Any clergyman having ecclesiastical preferment; one who is in orders, or is licensed to preach; a preacher.

personnoun (n.) A character or part, as in a play; a specific kind or manifestation of individual character, whether in real life, or in literary or dramatic representation; an assumed character.
 noun (n.) The bodily form of a human being; body; outward appearance; as, of comely person.
 noun (n.) A living, self-conscious being, as distinct from an animal or a thing; a moral agent; a human being; a man, woman, or child.
 noun (n.) A human being spoken of indefinitely; one; a man; as, any person present.
 noun (n.) A parson; the parish priest.
 noun (n.) Among Trinitarians, one of the three subdivisions of the Godhead (the Father, the Son, and the Holy Ghost); an hypostasis.
 noun (n.) One of three relations or conditions (that of speaking, that of being spoken to, and that of being spoken of) pertaining to a noun or a pronoun, and thence also to the verb of which it may be the subject.
 noun (n.) A shoot or bud of a plant; a polyp or zooid of the compound Hydrozoa Anthozoa, etc.; also, an individual, in the narrowest sense, among the higher animals.
 verb (v. t.) To represent as a person; to personify; to impersonate.

plassonnoun (n.) The albuminous material composing the body of a cytode.

pocosonnoun (n.) Low, wooded grounds or swamps in Eastern Maryland and Virginia.

ENGLISH WORDS RHYMING WITH DEMASON (According to first letters):

Rhyming Words According to First 6 Letters (demaso) - Words That Begins with demaso:

Rhyming Words According to First 5 Letters (demas) - Words That Begins with demas:

Rhyming Words According to First 4 Letters (dema) - Words That Begins with dema:

demagognoun (n.) Demagogue.

demagogicadjective (a.) Alt. of Demagogical

demagogicaladjective (a.) Relating to, or like, a demagogue; factious.

demagogismnoun (n.) The practices of a demagogue.

demagoguenoun (n.) A leader of the rabble; one who attempts to control the multitude by specious or deceitful arts; an unprincipled and factious mob orator or political leader.

demagogynoun (n.) Demagogism.

demainnoun (n.) Rule; management.
 noun (n.) See Demesne.

demandingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Demand

demandableadjective (a.) That may be demanded or claimed.

demandantnoun (n.) One who demands; the plaintiff in a real action; any plaintiff.

demandernoun (n.) One who demands.

demandressnoun (n.) A woman who demands.

demantoidnoun (n.) A yellow-green, transparent variety of garnet found in the Urals. It is valued as a gem because of its brilliancy of luster, whence the name.

demarcationnoun (n.) The act of marking, or of ascertaining and setting a limit; separation; distinction.

demarchnoun (n.) March; walk; gait.
 noun (n.) A chief or ruler of a deme or district in Greece.

demarkationnoun (n.) Same as Demarcation.

Rhyming Words According to First 3 Letters (dem) - Words That Begins with dem:

demenoun (n.) A territorial subdivision of Attica (also of modern Greece), corresponding to a township.
 noun (n.) An undifferentiated aggregate of cells or plastids.

demeaningnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Demean

demeannoun (n.) Demesne.
 noun (n.) Resources; means.
 verb (v. t.) To manage; to conduct; to treat.
 verb (v. t.) To conduct; to behave; to comport; -- followed by the reflexive pronoun.
 verb (v. t.) To debase; to lower; to degrade; -- followed by the reflexive pronoun.
 verb (v. t.) Management; treatment.
 verb (v. t.) Behavior; conduct; bearing; demeanor.

demeanancenoun (n.) Demeanor.

demeanurenoun (n.) Behavior.

demencynoun (n.) Dementia; loss of mental powers. See Insanity.

dementadjective (a.) Demented; dementate.
 verb (v. t.) To deprive of reason; to make mad.

dementationnoun (n.) The act of depriving of reason; madness.

dementedadjective (a.) Insane; mad; of unsound mind.

dementianoun (n.) Insanity; madness; esp. that form which consists in weakness or total loss of thought and reason; mental imbecility; idiocy.

demephitizingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Demephitize

demeritnoun (n.) That which one merits or deserves, either of good or ill; desert.
 noun (n.) That which deserves blame; ill desert; a fault; a vice; misconduct; -- the opposite of merit.
 noun (n.) The state of one who deserves ill.
 noun (n.) To deserve; -- said in reference to both praise and blame.
 noun (n.) To depreciate or cry down.
 verb (v. i.) To deserve praise or blame.

demersedadjective (a.) Situated or growing under water, as leaves; submersed.

demersionnoun (n.) The act of plunging into a fluid; a drowning.
 noun (n.) The state of being overwhelmed in water, or as if in water.

demesnenoun (n.) A lord's chief manor place, with that part of the lands belonging thereto which has not been granted out in tenancy; a house, and the land adjoining, kept for the proprietor's own use.

demesnialadjective (a.) Of or pertaining to a demesne; of the nature of a demesne.

deminoun (n.) See Demy, n.

demibastionnoun (n.) A half bastion, or that part of a bastion consisting of one face and one flank.

demibrigadenoun (n.) A half brigade.

demicadencenoun (n.) An imperfect or half cadence, falling on the dominant instead of on the key note.

demicannonnoun (n.) A kind of ordnance, carrying a ball weighing from thirty to thirty-six pounds.

demicirclenoun (n.) An instrument for measuring angles, in surveying, etc. It resembles a protractor, but has an alidade, sights, and a compass.

demiculverinnoun (n.) A kind of ordnance, carrying a ball weighing from nine to thirteen pounds.

demidevilnoun (n.) A half devil.

demigodnoun (n.) A half god, or an inferior deity; a fabulous hero, the offspring of a deity and a mortal.

demigoddessnoun (n.) A female demigod.

demigorgenoun (n.) Half the gorge, or entrance into a bastion, taken from the angle of the flank to the center of the bastion.

demigrationnoun (n.) Emigration.

demigroatnoun (n.) A half groat.

demijohnnoun (n.) A glass vessel or bottle with a large body and small neck, inclosed in wickerwork.

demilancenoun (n.) A light lance; a short spear; a half pike; also, a demilancer.

demilancernoun (n.) A soldier of light cavalry of the 16th century, who carried a demilance.

demilunenoun (n.) A work constructed beyond the main ditch of a fortress, and in front of the curtain between two bastions, intended to defend the curtain; a ravelin. See Ravelin.
 noun (n.) A crescentic mass of granular protoplasm present in the salivary glands.

demimannoun (n.) A half man.

demimondenoun (n.) Persons of doubtful reputation; esp., women who are kept as mistresses, though not public prostitutes; demireps.

deminaturedadjective (a.) Having half the nature of another.

demiquavernoun (n.) A note of half the length of the quaver; a semiquaver.

demireliefnoun (n.) Alt. of Demirelievo

demirelievonoun (n.) Half relief. See Demi-rilievo.

demirepnoun (n.) A woman of doubtful reputation or suspected character; an adventuress.

demisabilitynoun (n.) The state of being demisable.

demisableadjective (a.) Capable of being leased; as, a demisable estate.

demisenoun (n.) Transmission by formal act or conveyance to an heir or successor; transference; especially, the transfer or transmission of the crown or royal authority to a successor.
 noun (n.) The decease of a royal or princely person; hence, also, the death of any illustrious person.
 noun (n.) The conveyance or transfer of an estate, either in fee for life or for years, most commonly the latter.
 verb (v. t.) To transfer or transmit by succession or inheritance; to grant or bestow by will; to bequeath.
 verb (v. t.) To convey; to give.
 verb (v. t.) To convey, as an estate, by lease; to lease.

demisingnoun (p. pr. & vb. n.) of Demise

demisemiquavernoun (n.) A short note, equal in time to the half of a semiquaver, or the thirty-second part of a whole note.

demissadjective (a.) Cast down; humble; submissive.

demissionnoun (n.) The act of demitting, or the state of being demitted; a letting down; a lowering; dejection.
 noun (n.) Resignation of an office.

demissionaryadjective (a.) Pertaining to transfer or conveyance; as, a demissionary deed.
 adjective (a.) Tending to lower, depress, or degrade.

demissiveadjective (a.) Downcast; submissive; humble.

demisuitnoun (n.) A suit of light armor covering less than the whole body, as having no protection for the legs below the thighs, no vizor to the helmet, and the like.


English Words which starts with 'dem' and ends with 'son':

English Words which starts with 'de' and ends with 'on':

deaconnoun (n.) An officer in Christian churches appointed to perform certain subordinate duties varying in different communions. In the Roman Catholic and Episcopal churches, a person admitted to the lowest order in the ministry, subordinate to the bishops and priests. In Presbyterian churches, he is subordinate to the minister and elders, and has charge of certain duties connected with the communion service and the care of the poor. In Congregational churches, he is subordinate to the pastor, and has duties as in the Presbyterian church.
 noun (n.) The chairman of an incorporated company.
 verb (v. t.) To read aloud each line of (a psalm or hymn) before singing it, -- usually with off.
 verb (v. t.) With humorous reference to hypocritical posing: To pack (fruit or vegetables) with the finest specimens on top; to alter slyly the boundaries of (land); to adulterate or doctor (an article to be sold), etc.

dealbationnoun (n.) Act of bleaching; a whitening.

deambulationnoun (n.) A walking abroad; a promenading.

deaurationnoun (n.) Act of gilding.

debacchationnoun (n.) Wild raving or debauchery.

debarkationnoun (n.) Disembarkation.

debellationnoun (n.) The act of conquering or subduing.

debilitationnoun (n.) The act or process of debilitating, or the condition of one who is debilitated; weakness.

debituminizationnoun (n.) The act of depriving of bitumen.

debulitionnoun (n.) A bubbling or boiling over.

decachordonnoun (n.) An ancient Greek musical instrument of ten strings, resembling the harp.
 noun (n.) Something consisting of ten parts.

decagonnoun (n.) A plane figure having ten sides and ten angles; any figure having ten angles. A regular decagon is one that has all its sides and angles equal.

decahedronnoun (n.) A solid figure or body inclosed by ten plane surfaces.

decalcificationnoun (n.) The removal of calcareous matter.

decameronnoun (n.) A celebrated collection of tales, supposed to be related in ten days; -- written in the 14th century, by Boccaccio, an Italian.

decantationnoun (n.) The act of pouring off a clear liquor gently from its lees or sediment, or from one vessel into another.

decapitationnoun (n.) The act of beheading; beheading.

decarbonizationnoun (n.) The action or process of depriving a substance of carbon.

decarburizationnoun (n.) The act, process, or result of decarburizing.

decentralizationnoun (n.) The action of decentralizing, or the state of being decentralized.

deceptionnoun (n.) The act of deceiving or misleading.
 noun (n.) The state of being deceived or misled.
 noun (n.) That which deceives or is intended to deceive; false representation; artifice; cheat; fraud.

decerptionnoun (n.) The act of plucking off; a cropping.
 noun (n.) That which is plucked off or rent away; a fragment; a piece.

decertationnoun (n.) Contest for mastery; contention; strife.

decessionnoun (n.) Departure; decrease; -- opposed to accesion.

decillionnoun (n.) According to the English notation, a million involved to the tenth power, or a unit with sixty ciphers annexed; according to the French and American notation, a thousand involved to the eleventh power, or a unit with thirty-three ciphers annexed. [See the Note under Numeration.]

decimationnoun (n.) A tithing.
 noun (n.) A selection of every tenth person by lot, as for punishment.
 noun (n.) The destruction of any large proportion, as of people by pestilence or war.

decisionnoun (n.) Cutting off; division; detachment of a part.
 noun (n.) The act of deciding; act of settling or terminating, as a controversy, by giving judgment on the matter at issue; determination, as of a question or doubt; settlement; conclusion.
 noun (n.) An account or report of a conclusion, especially of a legal adjudication or judicial determination of a question or cause; as, a decision of arbitrators; a decision of the Supreme Court.
 noun (n.) The quality of being decided; prompt and fixed determination; unwavering firmness; as, to manifest great decision.

declamationnoun (n.) The act or art of declaiming; rhetorical delivery; haranguing; loud speaking in public; especially, the public recitation of speeches as an exercise in schools and colleges; as, the practice declamation by students.
 noun (n.) A set or harangue; declamatory discourse.
 noun (n.) Pretentious rhetorical display, with more sound than sense; as, mere declamation.

declarationnoun (n.) The act of declaring, or publicly announcing; explicit asserting; undisguised token of a ground or side taken on any subject; proclamation; exposition; as, the declaration of an opinion; a declaration of war, etc.
 noun (n.) That which is declared or proclaimed; announcement; distinct statement; formal expression; avowal.
 noun (n.) The document or instrument containing such statement or proclamation; as, the Declaration of Independence (now preserved in Washington).
 noun (n.) That part of the process in which the plaintiff sets forth in order and at large his cause of complaint; the narration of the plaintiff's case containing the count, or counts. See Count, n., 3.

declensionnoun (n.) The act or the state of declining; declination; descent; slope.
 noun (n.) A falling off towards a worse state; a downward tendency; deterioration; decay; as, the declension of virtue, of science, of a state, etc.
 noun (n.) Act of courteously refusing; act of declining; a declinature; refusal; as, the declension of a nomination.
 noun (n.) Inflection of nouns, adjectives, etc., according to the grammatical cases.
 noun (n.) The form of the inflection of a word declined by cases; as, the first or the second declension of nouns, adjectives, etc.
 noun (n.) Rehearsing a word as declined.

declinationnoun (n.) The act or state of bending downward; inclination; as, declination of the head.
 noun (n.) The act or state of falling off or declining from excellence or perfection; deterioration; decay; decline.
 noun (n.) The act of deviating or turning aside; oblique motion; obliquity; withdrawal.
 noun (n.) The act or state of declining or refusing; withdrawal; refusal; averseness.
 noun (n.) The angular distance of any object from the celestial equator, either northward or southward.
 noun (n.) The arc of the horizon, contained between the vertical plane and the prime vertical circle, if reckoned from the east or west, or between the meridian and the plane, reckoned from the north or south.
 noun (n.) The act of inflecting a word; declension. See Decline, v. t., 4.

decoctionnoun (n.) The act or process of boiling anything in a watery fluid to extract its virtues.
 noun (n.) An extract got from a body by boiling it in water.

decollationnoun (n.) The act of beheading or state of one beheaded; -- especially used of the execution of St. John the Baptist.
 noun (n.) A painting representing the beheading of a saint or martyr, esp. of St. John the Baptist.

decolorationnoun (n.) The removal or absence of color.

decompositionnoun (n.) The act or process of resolving the constituent parts of a compound body or substance into its elementary parts; separation into constituent part; analysis; the decay or dissolution consequent on the removal or alteration of some of the ingredients of a compound; disintegration; as, the decomposition of wood, rocks, etc.
 noun (n.) The state of being reduced into original elements.
 noun (n.) Repeated composition; a combination of compounds.

deconcentrationnoun (n.) Act of deconcentrating.

decorationnoun (n.) The act of adorning, embellishing, or honoring; ornamentation.
 noun (n.) That which adorns, enriches, or beautifies; something added by way of embellishment; ornament.
 noun (n.) Specifically, any mark of honor to be worn upon the person, as a medal, cross, or ribbon of an order of knighthood, bestowed for services in war, great achievements in literature, art, etc.

decorticationnoun (n.) The act of stripping off the bark, rind, hull, or outer coat.

decreationnoun (n.) Destruction; -- opposed to creation.

decrepitationnoun (n.) The act of decrepitating; a crackling noise, such as salt makes when roasting.

decretionnoun (n.) A decrease.

decrustationnoun (n.) The removal of a crust.

decubationnoun (n.) Act of lying down; decumbence.

decurionnoun (n.) A head or chief over ten; especially, an officer who commanded a division of ten soldiers.

decursionnoun (n.) A flowing; also, a hostile incursion.

decurtationnoun (n.) Act of cutting short.

decussationnoun (n.) Act of crossing at an acute angle, or state of being thus crossed; an intersection in the form of an X; as, the decussation of lines, nerves, etc.

dedecorationnoun (n.) Disgrace; dishonor.

dedentitionnoun (n.) The shedding of teeth.

dedicationnoun (n.) The act of setting apart or consecrating to a divine Being, or to a sacred use, often with religious solemnities; solemn appropriation; as, the dedication of Solomon's temple.
 noun (n.) A devoting or setting aside for any particular purpose; as, a dedication of lands to public use.
 noun (n.) An address to a patron or friend, prefixed to a book, testifying respect, and often recommending the work to his special protection and favor.

deditionnoun (n.) The act of yielding; surrender.

deductionnoun (n.) Act or process of deducing or inferring.
 noun (n.) Act of deducting or taking away; subtraction; as, the deduction of the subtrahend from the minuend.
 noun (n.) That which is deduced or drawn from premises by a process of reasoning; an inference; a conclusion.
 noun (n.) That which is deducted; the part taken away; abatement; as, a deduction from the yearly rent.

deduplicationnoun (n.) The division of that which is morphologically one organ into two or more, as the division of an organ of a plant into a pair or cluster.

defalcationnoun (n.) A lopping off; a diminution; abatement; deficit. Specifically: Reduction of a claim by deducting a counterclaim; set- off.
 noun (n.) That which is lopped off, diminished, or abated.
 noun (n.) An abstraction of money, etc., by an officer or agent having it in trust; an embezzlement.

defamationnoun (n.) Act of injuring another's reputation by any slanderous communication, written or oral; the wrong of maliciously injuring the good name of another; slander; detraction; calumny; aspersion.

defatigationnoun (n.) Weariness; fatigue.

defecationnoun (n.) The act of separating from impurities, as lees or dregs; purification.
 noun (n.) The act or process of voiding excrement.

defectionnoun (n.) Act of abandoning a person or cause to which one is bound by allegiance or duty, or to which one has attached himself; desertion; failure in duty; a falling away; apostasy; backsliding.

defedationnoun (n.) The act of making foul; pollution.

defibrinationnoun (n.) The act or process of depriving of fibrin.

defigurationnoun (n.) Disfiguration; mutilation.

defiliationnoun (n.) Abstraction of a child from its parents.

definitionnoun (n.) The act of defining; determination of the limits; as, a telescope accurate in definition.
 noun (n.) Act of ascertaining and explaining the signification; a description of a thing by its properties; an explanation of the meaning of a word or term; as, the definition of "circle;" the definition of "wit;" an exact definition; a loose definition.
 noun (n.) Description; sort.
 noun (n.) An exact enunciation of the constituents which make up the logical essence.
 noun (n.) Distinctness or clearness, as of an image formed by an optical instrument; precision in detail.

deflagrationnoun (n.) A burning up; conflagration.
 noun (n.) The act or process of deflagrating.

deflectionnoun (n.) The act of turning aside, or state of being turned aside; a turning from a right line or proper course; a bending, esp. downward; deviation.
 noun (n.) The deviation of a shot or ball from its true course.
 noun (n.) A deviation of the rays of light toward the surface of an opaque body; inflection; diffraction.
 noun (n.) The bending which a beam or girder undergoes from its own weight or by reason of a load.

deflectionizationnoun (n.) The act of freeing from inflections.

deflexionnoun (n.) See Deflection.

deflorationnoun (n.) The act of deflouring; as, the defloration of a virgin.
 noun (n.) That which is chosen as the flower or choicest part; careful culling or selection.

defluxionnoun (n.) A discharge or flowing of humors or fluid matter, as from the nose in catarrh; -- sometimes used synonymously with inflammation.

defoedationnoun (n.) Defedation.

defoliationnoun (n.) The separation of ripened leaves from a branch or stem; the falling or shedding of the leaves.

deforciationnoun (n.) Same as Deforcement, n.

deformationnoun (n.) The act of deforming, or state of anything deformed.
 noun (n.) Transformation; change of shape.

defraudationnoun (n.) The act of defrauding; a taking by fraud.

defunctionnoun (n.) Death.

degenerationnoun (n.) The act or state of growing worse, or the state of having become worse; decline; degradation; debasement; degeneracy; deterioration.
 noun (n.) That condition of a tissue or an organ in which its vitality has become either diminished or perverted; a substitution of a lower for a higher form of structure; as, fatty degeneration of the liver.
 noun (n.) A gradual deterioration, from natural causes, of any class of animals or plants or any particular organ or organs; hereditary degradation of type.
 noun (n.) The thing degenerated.

deglutinationnoun (n.) The act of ungluing.

deglutitionnoun (n.) The act or process of swallowing food; the power of swallowing.

degradationnoun (n.) The act of reducing in rank, character, or reputation, or of abasing; a lowering from one's standing or rank in office or society; diminution; as, the degradation of a peer, a knight, a general, or a bishop.
 noun (n.) The state of being reduced in rank, character, or reputation; baseness; moral, physical, or intellectual degeneracy; disgrace; abasement; debasement.
 noun (n.) Diminution or reduction of strength, efficacy, or value; degeneration; deterioration.
 noun (n.) A gradual wearing down or wasting, as of rocks and banks, by the action of water, frost etc.
 noun (n.) The state or condition of a species or group which exhibits degraded forms; degeneration.
 noun (n.) Arrest of development, or degeneration of any organ, or of the body as a whole.

degravationadjective (a.) The act of making heavy.

degustationnoun (n.) Tasting; the appreciation of sapid qualities by the taste organs.

dehonestationnoun (n.) A dishonoring; disgracing.

dehortationnoun (n.) Dissuasion; advice against something.

dehydrationnoun (n.) The act or process of freeing from water; also, the condition of a body from which the water has been removed.

dehydrogenationnoun (n.) The act or process of freeing from hydrogen; also, the condition resulting from the removal of hydrogen.

deificationnoun (n.) The act of deifying; exaltation to divine honors; apotheosis; excessive praise.

dejectionnoun (n.) A casting down; depression.
 noun (n.) The act of humbling or abasing one's self.
 noun (n.) Lowness of spirits occasioned by grief or misfortune; mental depression; melancholy.
 noun (n.) A low condition; weakness; inability.
 noun (n.) The discharge of excrement.
 noun (n.) Faeces; excrement.

dejerationnoun (n.) The act of swearing solemnly.

delacerationnoun (n.) A tearing in pieces.

delacrymationnoun (n.) An involuntary discharge of watery humors from the eyes; wateriness of the eyes.

delactationnoun (n.) The act of weaning.

delaminationnoun (n.) Formation and separation of laminae or layers; one of the methods by which the various blastodermic layers of the ovum are differentiated.

delapsationnoun (n.) See Delapsion.

delapsionnoun (n.) A falling down, or out of place; prolapsion.

delassationnoun (n.) Fatigue.

delationnoun (n.) Conveyance.
 noun (n.) Accusation by an informer.

delectationnoun (n.) Great pleasure; delight.

delegationnoun (n.) The act of delegating, or investing with authority to act for another; the appointment of a delegate or delegates.
 noun (n.) One or more persons appointed or chosen, and commissioned to represent others, as in a convention, in Congress, etc.; the collective body of delegates; as, the delegation from Massachusetts; a deputation.
 noun (n.) A kind of novation by which a debtor, to be liberated from his creditor, gives him a third person, who becomes obliged in his stead to the creditor, or to the person appointed by him.

deletionnoun (n.) Act of deleting, blotting out, or erasing; destruction.

delibationnoun (n.) Act of tasting; a slight trial.